2400 Articles
Medium 9781475844849

Looking Behind the Curtain

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Eleanor Drago-Severson

Patricia Maslin-Ostrowski
Jessica Blum-DeStefano

Looking Behind the Curtain

Principals’ Internal Experiences of Managing Pressing Challenges

ABSTRACT: This article extends mixed-methods longitudinal research with school and district leaders (2008–present) about their most pressing leadership challenges. Here—through in-depth, qualitative interviews—we explore how a subsample of 30 principals described and understood their internal experiences of addressing pressing challenges. More specifically, using an adaptive/technical lens, social-emotional frameworks, and constructive-developmental theory, we illuminate how principals’ social-emotional and developmental capacities influenced their leadership, and highlight findings with in-depth mini-cases. By focusing on the inner workings of principals’ leadership for managing change, this article offers implications for professional practice and school-wide change locally and globally, leadership preparation, policy, and future research.

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Medium 9781475844849

Embedding Performance Assessments for Leaders into Preparation

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Margaret Terry Orr

Liz Hollingworth

Janice Cook

Embedding Performance Assessments for Leaders into Preparation

A Comparison of Approaches, Candidates, and Assessment Evidence

ABSTRACT: This article presents pilot study results of two leadership performance assessments, designed for a California principal preparation program and embedded in preparation using two learning approaches. The pilot study had two purposes: to evaluate the assessments’ content validity and to evaluate the candidates’ leadership skills as demonstrated through their assessment products and an independent self-assessment tool. The evidence showed the tasks to be valid and useful tools for formative leadership development for different candidates and school settings. Participant feedback on the assessments’ benefits and independent self-assessment ratings provided construct validation. We concluded that these are promising assessment tools for programs’ use in candidate assessment.

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Medium 9781475844849

Urban Principal Narratives on Including Black Boys with Emotional Disabilities

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

David E. DeMatthews

Urban Principal Narratives on Including Black Boys with Emotional Disabilities

ABSTRACT: Black boys in racially segregated urban schools are vulnerable to the trappings of the school-to-prison-pipeline. In this article, I use narrative inquiry and critical race theory (CRT) to examine the stories of two elementary school principals struggling to create more inclusive schools for Black boys with emotional disabilities (ED) in a racially segregated and low-performing district. Each principal narrative describes efforts to transition a student with ED from a district-created self-contained program to a full-time or near-full-time placement in an inclusive general education classroom. Despite the principals’ overall success in creating more inclusive schools for most students with disabilities in a challenging district context, each principal narrative ends with a student being unsuccessful in an inclusive setting and returned to a segregated program. The findings highlight how principals who recognize the vulnerability of Black boys in special education are compelled to create more inclusive schools, but can confront significant institutional, organizational, and social and emotional challenges. Applying CRT to these cases provides additional insights into how principals can develop inclusive schools and challenge segregated programs. While some inclusive leadership practices aimed at improving the educational outcomes of Black boys are identified throughout these narratives, the significance of the study lies in documenting and understanding how principals experience the barriers and challenges to creating more socially just and inclusive schools.

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Medium 9781475845914

Perceptions of Elementary Principals on Compass Evaluation System

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Eboni Brown

Krishna Bista

Perceptions of Elementary Principals on Compass Evaluation System

A Case of Louisiana Schools

ABSTRACT: This study explores the perceptions of elementary school principals on the Compass teacher evaluation system in a Southern Louisiana school district in the United States. There were seven themes that emerged from the qualitative data analysis: compliance, subjectivity, accountability, expectation, confinement, inconsistency, and helpfulness. Data analysis led to the following major findings: (a) all principals comply with the functions of Compass; (b) principals experience subjectivity when using the Compass teacher evaluation system; (c) principals believe that Compass holds teachers accountable for their performances; (d) principals would like Compass to be consistent, unambiguous, and not place limitations on teacher practices; and (e) principals experience a lack of involvement and support from the central office.

KEY WORDS: Elementary Principals, Compass, Teacher Evaluation, Accountability, Professional Development, Central Office

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Medium 9781475845914

The Evaluation Process, Administrator Feedback, and Teacher Self-Efficacy

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Rebeca Mireles-Rios

John A. Becchio

The Evaluation Process, Administrator Feedback, and Teacher Self-Efficacy

ABSTRACT: The teacher evaluation process provides opportunity for instructional feedback and teacher improvement, but also may influence the beliefs teachers have about the quality of their own work and their confidence levels as a teacher. Self-efficacy plays a vital role in determining teacher effectiveness and the students’ academic experience, but little is known about the impact the teacher evaluation process has on teacher self-efficacy. Interview data from 28 high school teachers indicated that the pre-observation meeting has potential to significantly benefit teachers. In addition, feedback from administrators that included both strengths and weaknesses during the post-observation phase seemed to have the most influence on teachers’ self-confidence. Implications of this study’s findings were provided and may be useful for administrators to conduct teacher evaluations in a manner that serves to enhance teacher self-efficacy.

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