1334 Articles
Medium 9781475848533

Black Masculine Caring and the Dilemma faced by Black Male Leaders

Murakami, Elizabeth; Tran, Natalie Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Lisa Bass

Kendrick Alston

Black Masculine Caring and the Dilemma faced by Black Male Leaders

Abstract: The status of Black males in schools and society continues to be concerning, as Black males appear to fall behind other groups in almost every arena, particularly educationally, socially, and professionally. Yet despite their social standing, Black male administrators are often placed in, and have taken on, the charge to serve in high need schools where they oversee the education of Black males and other disadvantaged students. Therefore, there are many Black male students who have Black male administrators. This places them in a position to make a difference in lives of the Black male students and the other students they serve from less privileged backgrounds. This conceptual article discusses the professional challenges faced by Black male leaders and how they choose to lead schools despite these challenges. Tenants of the Black Masculine Caring (BMC) framework are introduced which illuminate ways in which Black male administrators practice interpersonal and institutional care, and how the way they care for students impacts school culture and climate. This article contributes to the literature on school leadership, as all school leaders, regardless of their race, or the race of their students, are expected to maintain positive school cultures and climates in which students are emotionally supported (Blankstein, 2004; Murphy and Torre, 2014). Implications for educational administrators are discussed.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475848533

Knowing Leadership: Students of Color (Re)considering Togetherness with Leaders and Authority Figures

Murakami, Elizabeth; Tran, Natalie Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Ty-Ron M. O. Douglas

Jennifer M. Beasley

Emily R. Crawford

Juan A. Ríos Vega

Cayce McCamish

Knowing Leadership:

Students of Color (Re)considering Togetherness with Leaders and Authority Figures

Abstract: Drawing on Bauman’s (1995) conceptualization of various forms of togetherness and Giroux (2005) and Anzaldúa (2007) explication of border theory, this paper presents findings of a research study that investigates how students of color come to know leaders and authority figures. Findings suggest that students identified “leaders” in part based on their relationships and connections with them and the perceived benefit of such connection. Family members and teachers were considered leaders when students’ relationships with them reflected Bauman’s (1995) “being-for” perspective, as characterized by positive role modeling and empathy. In schools, teachers—rather than school administrators—were most often described as leaders. These relationships were commonly associated with disciplinary issues and the enforcement of rules, and a colorblind system. Implications suggest that relationship characteristics in the borderlands of schools influence the perception of effective school leadership and school authority for students of color.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475848533

Toward a theory of Engaged School Leadership: Positive psychology and principal candidates’ sense of engagement and their preparedness to lead engagement

Murakami, Elizabeth; Tran, Natalie Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Karen Stansberry Beard

Toward a theory of Engaged School Leadership

Positive psychology and principal candidates’ sense of engagement and their preparedness to lead engagement

Abstract: This study explored principle licensure students’ sense of engagement, program effectiveness, and preparedness to lead engagement focused on academic achievement. Data analysis using attributes of effective preparation programs, and positive psychology constructs (e.g., flow) found Goal Achievement, Commitment, and Accomplishment significantly related to flow. Flow was significantly related to Engagement, while Care was significantly related to Commitment and Coping. Perhaps more significantly, the findings yielded seven characteristics of Engaged School Leadership Theory (ESTL) development. Adding to both principal preparation and positive psychology literature, this study offers conceptual understandings toward an emerging theory of Engaged School Leadership.

Key Words: Engaged School Leadership Theory, Principal Preparation, Positive Psychology, Flow, Engagement, Program Effectiveness, Mixed Method Research, Mixed-Method Sequential Explanatory Design

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475848533

The Role of Trauma in Leadership Socialization

Murakami, Elizabeth; Tran, Natalie Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Noelle W. Arnold

Azadeh F. Osanloo

René O. Guillaume

Christa Boske

Wendi Miller-Tomlinson

The Role of Trauma in
Leadership Socialization

Abstract: There is fertile ground to expand the ideas of resilience and growth as two important skills in leadership (Bell, 2009). Little research has examined how trauma and violence are reappropriated in post-trauma contexts. In fact, resiliency and adaptive strategies often influence life and career choices (Wolin & Wolin, 1993). Although this literature base has grown, little attention has been paid to the long-term impact of IPV on battered women’s career development and stages. This article examines the influence of life trauma on the socialization and practice of two Black female principals. Their responses to pain, suffering, trauma, and violence highlight women’s agency and their ability to create their own good from pain (Mitchem, 2002).

Key Words: Trauma, Violence, Social Cognitive Career Theory, Educational Leadership, Leadership Socialization

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475848533

Special Issue Introduction: The Psychology of Educational Leadership

Murakami, Elizabeth; Tran, Natalie Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Karen Stansberry Beard

Noelle Witherspoon Arnold

Ty-Ron M. O. Douglas

Special Issue Introduction

The Psychology of Educational Leadership

While there are many definitions of leadership, one implicit theme across all is the importance of psychological phenomena and processes in leading and following (Bell, 2003). Considerable research has been devoted to explicating the traits and characteristics of individual leaders; however, less has been devoted to leadership in context and as existing in an ecology of its own (Witherspoon Arnold, forthcoming). For example, this leadership ecology is influenced by how leaders make meaning of their leadership and the effectiveness of their leadership in and across contexts (Beard, 2015; 2016). The complex and demanding role of leadership requires examination of the employment of psychological levers, buffers, and mediators that impact leadership understandings, behaviors, and practices.

Personality models represent a standardization of leadership and have largely failed (Haslam, Reicher, & Platow, 2011) to inform or predict leadership effectiveness. Stodgill’s (1948) predictive indicators of leadership were found to be unpredictable when testing could not control for context. Moreover, Strodbeck and Mann’s (1956) subsequent research revealed that the meanings associated with standardized leadership concepts was highly variable. While psychology has expanded beyond the “great man” ideas of leadership, field educational leadership has moved more slowly than other fields in exploring the psychology of leadership and practice in context. While educational leadership has explored leadership as a negotiation of epistemologies, ontologies, and axiologies, and not a static end result (Witherspoon & Taylor, 2010), it has not systematically assessed the variations in leadership across educational ecologies.

See All Chapters

See All Articles