6 Articles
Medium 9781475824483

Using Technology in Schools to Enhance Student Performance

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers PDF

Using Technology in Schools to

Enhance Student Performance

Elizabeth McCallum

Ara J. Schmitt

Guest Editors

E

ducators charged with ensuring that all students meet state achievement standards are increasingly exploring avenues of scientifically supported intervention. Given the broad range of student abilities within classrooms and the limited instructional time and resources available to teachers, it is a challenge to meet the unique curricular needs of each child. Instructional practices that allow teachers to most effectively and efficiently educate all students prove to be invaluable educational resources. One manner of meeting these demands is to incorporate technology within instructional practices and interventions. Research indicates that technology can be used to help students acquire new academic competencies and to remediate existing academic skill deficits (Heward, 1994; MacArthur & Hall, 2009;

Wepner & Bowes, 2004). When effective for individual students, technology may not only assist them in increasing their achievement but can also foster self-regulated learning strategies.

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Medium 9781475824483

Adding Listening Previewing to Decrease Reading Errors During Peer Tutoring and Increase Reading Fluency and Comprehension

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers PDF

Adding Listening Previewing to Decrease Reading Errors

During Peer Tutoring and

Increase Reading Fluency and Comprehension

Renee O. Hawkins

Elizabeth McCallum

Shannon McGuire

Elizabeth Barkley

Laura Berry

Jennifer Hailley

ABSTRACT: The effects of a peer-mediated repeated-readings condition (PRR) were compared to the effects of the same peer tutoring condition with the addition of a listening-previewing component (PRR + LP) on reading fluency, comprehension, and reading errors during tutoring. An alternating-treatments design was used to compare the effects of the two interventions and a silent reading control condition for six fourth-grade students. Results indicated that both PRR conditions resulted in higher levels of oral reading fluency and comprehension than the control condition. Of the two peer tutoring conditions, the PRR + LP condition resulted in greater reading fluency and comprehension scores and fewer errors during tutoring. Discussion focuses on the benefits of using technology to incorporate LP as part of tutoring programs.

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Medium 9781475824483

Reading Pen Decoding and Vocabulary Accommodations: Impact on Student Comprehension Accuracy and Rate

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers PDF

Reading Pen Decoding and

Vocabulary Accommodations:

Impact on Student

Comprehension Accuracy and Rate

Ara J. Schmitt

Elizabeth McCallum

Danielle Rubinic

Renee O. Hawkins

ABSTRACT: This study investigated the effects of reading pen assistive technology on the comprehension accuracy and rate of students with identified reading disabilities.

An alternating-treatments design was implemented to compare the effects of (1) a decoding accommodation, (2) concurrent decoding and vocabulary accommodations, and (3) a no-accommodation control condition on the comprehension of three high school students when provided grade-level reading passages. Results indicate that student comprehension accuracy and rate were often negatively affected by use of reading pen accommodations. Of the three conditions, poorest student performance was present when both reading pen accommodations (i.e., decoding and vocabulary) were available for use. Discussion explores reasons for this unexpected finding and emphasizes the importance of evaluating the effectiveness of specific accommodations with individual students.

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Medium 9781475824483

Enhancing Sight Word Reading in Second-Grade Students Using a Computer-Based Sight Word Reading System

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Enhancing Sight Word Reading in Second-Grade Students Using a Computer-Based Sight Word

Reading System

Angela N. Hilton-Prillhart

Michael B. Hopkins

Christopher H. Skinner

Sara McCane-Bowling

ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of a computer-based sight word reading intervention was evaluated using a multiple-baseline design across three second-grade students: one English-language learner, one student with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and one general education student. All students were receiving responseto-intervention services to remedy reading skill deficits and had difficulty reading primer and first-grade Dolche words. After a computer-based intervention was applied in conjunction with a self-monitoring procedure, all three students made rapid and steady gains in sight word reading. Discussion focuses on how educators can use simple computer programs to develop procedures designed to enhance students’ sight word reading accuracy, as well as directions for future research.

THE PROBLEM

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Enhancing Math Fact Fluency via Taped Problems in Intact Second- and Fourth-Grade Classrooms

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Enhancing Math Fact Fluency via Taped Problems in

Intact Second- and

Fourth-Grade Classrooms

Daniel F. McCleary

Kathleen B. Aspiranti

Christopher H. Skinner

Lisa N. Foster

Elisa Luna

Katrina Murray

Sara J. McCane-Bowling

Amanda Woody

ABSTRACT: Researchers conducted two studies—one in an urban fourth-grade classroom and one in a rural second-grade classroom—designed to evaluate the effects of a taped-problems intervention on addition and multiplication fact fluency. Both studies were initiated by educators, and both employed across-tasks, multiple-baseline designs. Data from the second-grade class suggest that the procedure was effective, but increasing baseline-phase data hindered interpretation.

Data from the fourth-grade class provide clearer support that the intervention increased fluency; however, over time this class’s improvements ceased, and its performance became highly variable. Consequently, the taped-problems intervention was supplemented with an interdependent group-oriented reward, and the class average reached mastery criteria. Between the two studies, most students increased their fluency, and these increases were maintained; however, some students showed no gains. Discussion focuses on limitations and directions for future applied and theoretical research.

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