1564 Articles
Medium 9781442267916

Archival and Genealogical Cultures: French and Spanish Colonial Records Across Three Centuries in New Orleans

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Susan Tucker

Newcomb Archives, Newcomb College Institute, Tulane University, 62 Newcomb Place, #203, New Orleans, LA 70118; email: susannah@tulane.edu

Abstract    This article looks at the French and Spanish colonial judicial records of Louisiana and uses these records as a prism into the history of genealogy. The trajectory of the records’ creation and care over three centuries takes readers on a journey of varying archival cultures, ephemera, philosophies, and economies of care and neglect. This is also an essay about the city as a main character—as a symbol for the foundation of an archival and genealogical culture. Records are at the center of the practice of family history for many people, and thus their stories tell us about a significance beyond a specificity of place. Nevertheless, specific cultures represent varying archival and genealogical practices, and New Orleans especially has a distinctive recordkeeping past worthy of study.

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Medium 9781442267916

The Next Level: Automating the Collection Records at the Peabody Museum

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

David K. DeBono Schafer and Steven A. LeBlanc

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; email: dschafer@fas.harvard.edu and leblanc@fas.harvard.edu

Abstract    The first truly successful efforts to automate museum collection records took place in the late 1980s. The goal then was to get the basic paper records (the catalogue cards) into electronic form. This was soon followed by very primitive efforts to have an associated image of the object linked to the computer record. Today, about 25 years later, we can initially feel that “we have done that.” Most museums have some form of automated records. These are extremely useful and it is hard to imagine how we ever functioned with just paper. Yet, technological advances have been so rapid that most museums are still far behind what is potentially well within our grasp. Our goal in this article is to show what can be accomplished, how easily it can be realized, and the benefits of reaching the Next Level. We focus on the Peabody Museum both because we know it well, but also because the Peabody is one of the oldest museums in the country, so we probably have all the problems and issues one is likely to ever encounter (we have records written with quill pens!). Moreover, the collections are large. We have 600,000 catalog records representing six million items and over 400,000 historic photographs, along with vast quantities of archival material. Thus, we have had to find solutions that scale up, and can be done quickly and cheaply enough to make meaningful headway on our collections.

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Breaking Through Borders: Living in Extreme

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Thorid Zierold

Curator of Natural Sciences; Natural History Museum Chemnitz, Moritzstraβe 20, 09111 Chemnitz, Germany email: zierold@naturkunde-chemnitz. de

Abstract    Keeping a museum attractive and alive requires public awareness and community engagement. Engagement programs from Museums of Ethnology, History, or Art are well documented, whereas comparable activities of Natural History Museums are rare in recent times. This paper highlights a unique cooperation project between the Natural History Museum Chemnitz and a secondary school in which a group of students assumed the role of Young Curators to create a special exhibition. They decided the exhibition’s theme; set up the layout; and created displays, hands-on and established panels, and graphics. Presented in 2011, “Living in Extreme” was a journey through distinct habitats, including the rainforest, the desert, the deep sea, and the polar region. For this project, the Young Curators delivered high quality and amazing results. The feedback of the visitors and media was very positive and overall the project enhanced the public awareness on both the museum as well as the school side.

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Medium 9781442267916

Collecting a Spacesuit in the 21st Century

Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Cathleen S. Lewis

Smithsonian Institution Air and Space Museum, Independence Avenue at Sixth Street, sw, MRC 311 PO Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012; email: LewisCS@si.edu

Abstract    In 1972, the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum arranged to take possession of the remnants of the spacesuits that Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins had worn during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission that landed the first humans on the moon. NASA had put aside these spacesuits and the components that the astronauts had returned to Earth for the express purpose of display to re-create the iconic images of the mission. For many years, the Air and Space Museum had complied with these intentions, but over the years, the deterioration of the suits and their materials led to a reconsideration of the rationale for collecting and displaying the suits. The new approach led to a revised collecting strategy that placed greater emphasis on the suits’ point of creation and the negotiations that had occurred among those who built, designed, and wore the suits.

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Medium 9781475825831

Experiential Learning in Public Relations Through Student-Conducted Research Assignments

Journal of School Public Relations Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Experiential Learning in Public Relations Through Student-Conducted Research Assignments

Ron Prindle

ABSTRACT: As the responsibilities of public relations practitioners continue to expand to include institutional research, it is essential for universities to develop programs that prepare practitioners for these new expectations. This article describes the development of an experiential learning course focused on research for future public relations practitioners who were enrolled in an innovative undergraduate-level public relations research methods course. As part of the course, the third- and fourth-year public relations students conducted action research for an actual client. Details are provided about the course, along with guidelines on how instructors should create, implement, and assess a similar course.

KEYWORDS: experiential learning, research, focus groups, public relations, educational methods, practice-centered curricula, public relations

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