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Bibliography and Sources

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Bibliography and Sources

For Further Reading

Beviglia, Jim. 2015. “Behind the Song: The Grateful Dead, ‘Ripple.’” American Songwriter: The Craft of Music. September 29, 2015, http://americansongwriter.com/2015/09/behind-the-song-the-grateful-dead-ripple.

Browne, David. 2015. “Grateful Dead’s Robert Hunter on Jerry’s Final Days: ‘We Were Brothers,’ Part 2.” Rolling Stone. March 11, 2015, www.rollingstone.com/music/features/grateful-deads-robert-hunter-on-jerrys-final-days-we-were-brothers-20150311.

Carr, Revell. 2010. “Where All the Pages Are My Days: Metacantric Moments in Deadhead Lyrical Experience.” In The Grateful Dead in Concert: Essays on Live Improvisation, ed. Jim Tuedio and Stan Spector, 107–17. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

Dasaro, Daniel J., and Christian Crumlish. 2017. “The Dead’s Three Decades of ‘Dancin’ in the Streets’ (1966–1987).” March 24, 2018, http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2017/03/dancin-in-streets-guest-post.html.

Dodd, David. 2005. The Complete Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics. New York: Free Press.

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Online Grateful Dead Resources

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Online Grateful Dead Resources

In writing this book, we’ve been helped immensely by the work of others that is available on the internet. This page lists many of those resources. To fully inform yourself about the Grateful Dead, these are recommended places to start. Of course, you can simply google “Grateful Dead,” and you’ll find more than 12,000,000 results!

All Grateful Dead Original Song Debuts

A wonderful Archive.org list of every debut live performance of original Dead tunes with direct links to the debut performances. (Resources #1)

Allmusic.com

Although it’s not exclusively Grateful Dead, this site offers a thorough Dead discography and song list, among other items of interest. (Resources #2)

Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics by David Dodd

Dodd’s site has a terrific section on the Dead’s song lyrics as well as discographies for the band and musicians. No cover songs at this site. (Resources #3)

Archive.org

Complete set lists for most every Dead show with reviews, highlights, and streaming. (Resources #4)

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Bonus Tracks

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Bonus Tracks

There you have it—the Grateful Dead’s 100 essential songs. We had many, many discussions about what constitutes the essential Dead playlist, and now you’ve seen—and hopefully listened to—the list we agreed upon. Finishing this discussion of the Dead’s music, it’s important to remember that there’s no objective list of “best” or “essential” songs or concerts. Listening to music is a purely subjective experience. This was clear after every live Grateful Dead concert, as fans left and the discussions among them began. Although there was often agreement on the overall performance or even on specific songs, it was never unanimous—never! So having listed our “essential” songs, we know we’ll be asked why “Day Job” wasn’t included (just kidding!) or why we did include “Days Between.” We’ve given it our best shot. Now it’s time for you to join the discussion.

But before that discussion picks up speed, we’re adding a few “bonus tracks,” as the band did on many official releases after 1995. These are songs that almost made the top 100 but were left out for one reason or another. Many didn’t make the cut because of our earlier decisions about cover songs, for example, which we outlined in the introduction. Others, original songs, may have been pushed out because of the cover songs we did include or because their performances were limited.

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The 100 Essential Songs

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The 100 Essential Songs

“Alabama Getaway”

Simply put, “Alabama Getaway” (aka Alabama), composed by Jerry Garcia and Robert Hunter, is a rocker. From November 4, 1979, in Providence, Rhode Island, through June 2, 1995, in Mountain View, California, the Grateful Dead played Alabama as a rollicking, fast-paced, get-up-and-dance song. They played it 141 times in all, and eighty-eight of those occurred in its first three years between its first performance in 1979 and the end of 1981. In 1980 alone, the Dead performed Alabama fifty times in their eighty-six shows; only “Drumz” and “Althea” were performed more frequently.

Alabama was often the opening song in the first set: between March 13, 1982, and March 27, 1987, forty-seven consecutive performances of Alabama were show openers. After 1987, Alabama performances tapered off in frequency, and it was not played at all for 416 shows between 1989 and early 1995. In 1995, the Dead played Alabama four times, twice as the show’s opening number, including at its final performance on June 2, 1995. In short, “Alabama Getaway” had a relatively short but intense life in the Dead’s repertoire.

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Quick Start Guide

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Quick Start Guide

The Grateful Dead were known for the variety of musical genres they incorporated into their musical style. For readers who might like to experience some of this variety before exploring the list of 100 essential songs, this Quick Start Guide is the place to begin. If you are unfamiliar with the Dead’s musical eclecticism, first read the lyrics to these songs at dead.net. All of the links in this table are to live performances, and all appear later in the book with additional details.

Genre

Song and Date

Link

Folk

“Peggy-O” (May 7, 1977)

Q.S. #1

Rock and Roll

“One More Saturday Night” (April 8, 1972)

Q.S. #2

Bluegrass

“Cumberland Blues” (March 28, 1973)

Q.S. #3

Country Rock

“Mexicali Blues” (April 2, 1973)

Q.S. #4

Jazz

“Eyes of the World” (March 29, 1990)

Q.S. #5

Classic Dead

“Sugaree” (August 13, 1975)

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