76 Articles
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Medium 9781538104118

Editor’s Note

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Editor’s Note

Welcome to another year of Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals. This is the beginning of my tenth year of editing this journal—from my initial foray at guest editing two issues that considered public art as a collection (04:02 and 04:03) and the following issue that I edited as the journal transitioned from outgoing editor, Pamela J. White, to me. That was 2008. The journal was then in its fifth year.

Since that time, my own teaching, exhibition and collections-related work, and scholarship, have been influenced by the submissions that have come my way or by the suggestions from readers, authors, and Editorial Board members as to important work being done by scholars, practitioners, and paraprofessionals throughout the world. (Though our readership is primarily in North America and Europe, we do reach five continents regularly.) My work has also influenced what appears in the journal, of course. It is with sheer gratitude, as well as awe and wonder, that I prepare each issue for publication.

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Uncertain Images: Museums and the Work of Photographs edited by Elizabeth Edwards and Sigrid Lien

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Introduction to Metadata

Edited by Murtha Baca. 3rd edition. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2016. 96 pages. ISBN: 978-1-60606-479-5. Read online for free: http://www.getty.edu/publications/intrometadata/

Reviewed by Jessica Williams, Associate Collection Information Manager, Digital Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028; jessica.williams@metmuseum.org

Introduction to Metadata provides an overview of metadata and examines the methods, tools, and standards for presenting digital resources on the web. The guide focuses on the function of metadata in expanding access and use of digital collections in museums, libraries, and archives. The third edition has been updated to explore the changes in metadata standards and technologies in the information field, and includes an expanded glossary of terms. The guide is available as an online resource with updates posted on the project repository site GitHub.

In the initial chapter “Setting the Stage,” Anne Gilliland provides an overview of metadata for museums, libraries, and archives. Gilliland explains the types of metadata standards, including structure, value, content, and format/technical exchange, and the purpose of standards to maintain the quality, consistency, and interoperability of metadata. She examines the types and functions of metadata, including administrative, descriptive, preservation, technical, and use. She also focuses on the role of metadata in improving access, maintaining context, and expanding use of digital resources.

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Call for Papers and Proposals

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Diane Bruxvoort

University of Aberdeen

Diane Bruxvoort joined the University of Aberdeen’s Library, Special Collections and Museums as university librarian and director in the spring of 2014. Before this, she was the senior associate dean serving as deputy to the dean of Libraries at the University of Florida with responsibility for collections, acquisitions, cataloguing, public services, digital services, and special collections. Previously, Bruxvoort worked at the University of Houston Libraries for 10 years starting as the head of Access Services and ending her time there as the associate dean for Collections. While at Houston, she provided leadership for a major building program, led the transition to electronic access to journals, and affected a major redesign of the library website.

Before moving into academic libraries, she spent 17 years working in public libraries in and around Houston, Texas. Bruxvoort is president of the Library Leadership, Administration, and Management Division of the American Library Association.

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Museums, Ethics and Cultural Heritage edited by Bernice L. Murphy

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Introduction to Metadata

Edited by Murtha Baca. 3rd edition. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2016. 96 pages. ISBN: 978-1-60606-479-5. Read online for free: http://www.getty.edu/publications/intrometadata/

Reviewed by Jessica Williams, Associate Collection Information Manager, Digital Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028; jessica.williams@metmuseum.org

Introduction to Metadata provides an overview of metadata and examines the methods, tools, and standards for presenting digital resources on the web. The guide focuses on the function of metadata in expanding access and use of digital collections in museums, libraries, and archives. The third edition has been updated to explore the changes in metadata standards and technologies in the information field, and includes an expanded glossary of terms. The guide is available as an online resource with updates posted on the project repository site GitHub.

In the initial chapter “Setting the Stage,” Anne Gilliland provides an overview of metadata for museums, libraries, and archives. Gilliland explains the types of metadata standards, including structure, value, content, and format/technical exchange, and the purpose of standards to maintain the quality, consistency, and interoperability of metadata. She examines the types and functions of metadata, including administrative, descriptive, preservation, technical, and use. She also focuses on the role of metadata in improving access, maintaining context, and expanding use of digital resources.

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Medium 9781538104118

Introduction to Metadataedited by Murtha Baca

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Introduction to Metadata

Edited by Murtha Baca. 3rd edition. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2016. 96 pages. ISBN: 978-1-60606-479-5. Read online for free: http://www.getty.edu/publications/intrometadata/

Reviewed by Jessica Williams, Associate Collection Information Manager, Digital Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028; jessica.williams@metmuseum.org

Introduction to Metadata provides an overview of metadata and examines the methods, tools, and standards for presenting digital resources on the web. The guide focuses on the function of metadata in expanding access and use of digital collections in museums, libraries, and archives. The third edition has been updated to explore the changes in metadata standards and technologies in the information field, and includes an expanded glossary of terms. The guide is available as an online resource with updates posted on the project repository site GitHub.

In the initial chapter “Setting the Stage,” Anne Gilliland provides an overview of metadata for museums, libraries, and archives. Gilliland explains the types of metadata standards, including structure, value, content, and format/technical exchange, and the purpose of standards to maintain the quality, consistency, and interoperability of metadata. She examines the types and functions of metadata, including administrative, descriptive, preservation, technical, and use. She also focuses on the role of metadata in improving access, maintaining context, and expanding use of digital resources.

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Medium 9781538104118

Exploring the Concept of a “Legacy” Collection: A Study on German World War I Paper Textiles at the National Museum of American History

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Exploring the Concept of a “Legacy” Collection

A Study on German World War I Paper Textiles at the National Museum of American History

Kathleen King

Assistant Registrar, The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, 701 21st NW, Washington, DC 20052; kking15@gwu.edu

Abstract  Using a collection of surplus German military objects composed of woven paper from World War I in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History as a case study, this article questions the value of keeping objects that no longer support the current mission statement of a museum, or if they ever did. It does not aim to answer definitively such a tough question, as a multitude of factors and stakeholders are involved with such a decision, but rather it seeks to bring this subject matter to the fore of collections and curatorial management, to explore best practices, and to examine if such best practices are being readily followed. The objects’ history, manufacturing processes, materiality, conservation concerns, and significance are explored in an effort to build context around the objects and to determine the appropriateness of their occupancy within the museum.

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Silent Legacy: The Story of Vasily Konovalenko’s Gem-Carving Sculptures

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Silent Legacy

The Story of Vasily Konovalenko’s Gem-Carving Sculptures

Stephen E. Nash

Curator of Archaeology and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO; Stephen.nash@dmns.org

Frances Alley Kruger

Senior Exhibit Developer, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO, Frances.kruger@dmns.org

Abstract  During a career that spanned four decades, Russian artist Vasily Konovalenko (1929–1989) produced more than 70 sculptures carved from gems, minerals, and other raw materials. As unorthodox, compelling, and masterful as Konovalenko’s sculptures are, they had been poorly published and poorly known. They are on permanent display at only two museums in the world: the small and obscure State Gems Museum (Samotsvety) in Moscow, Russia, and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS), a major natural history museum in Colorado, the United States. This article examines Konovalenko’s life and work, as well as the unusual circumstances that led to the two exhibitions, their role in Konovalenko’s relative obscurity, and a recent resurgence of interest.

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Journal Welcomes New Board Members!

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Journal Welcomes New Editorial Board Members!

If you enjoy the journal, thank an Editorial Board member. You see, members of the Editorial Board fulfill key roles in the success of Collections. Working closely with the Editor, the Editorial Board helps to achieve the journal’s mission and, moreover, contributes to the journal in a variety of ways.

Key roles of the Editorial Board include:

•reviewing or arranging for peer review of a reasonable number of manuscripts per year and

•serving as guest editor(s), when appropriate, based on specialized expertise.

In addition, the Editorial Board:

•encourages appropriate submissions from a range of museum and archive professionals;

•provides contributor contacts for the Editor to solicit manuscripts;

•identifies books, symposia, conferences, and projects for review;

•locates reviewers for books, symposia, events, and the like;

•assists the Editor in keeping abreast of trends and issues in the field;

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House of Lost Worlds: Dinosaurs, Dynasties, and the Story of Life on Earthby Richard Conniff

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Introduction to Metadata

Edited by Murtha Baca. 3rd edition. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2016. 96 pages. ISBN: 978-1-60606-479-5. Read online for free: http://www.getty.edu/publications/intrometadata/

Reviewed by Jessica Williams, Associate Collection Information Manager, Digital Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028; jessica.williams@metmuseum.org

Introduction to Metadata provides an overview of metadata and examines the methods, tools, and standards for presenting digital resources on the web. The guide focuses on the function of metadata in expanding access and use of digital collections in museums, libraries, and archives. The third edition has been updated to explore the changes in metadata standards and technologies in the information field, and includes an expanded glossary of terms. The guide is available as an online resource with updates posted on the project repository site GitHub.

In the initial chapter “Setting the Stage,” Anne Gilliland provides an overview of metadata for museums, libraries, and archives. Gilliland explains the types of metadata standards, including structure, value, content, and format/technical exchange, and the purpose of standards to maintain the quality, consistency, and interoperability of metadata. She examines the types and functions of metadata, including administrative, descriptive, preservation, technical, and use. She also focuses on the role of metadata in improving access, maintaining context, and expanding use of digital resources.

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Medium 9781538101391

Crossroads and Intersections in the Post-Physical Archival Landscape: A Case Study at Middle Tennessee State University

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Crossroads and Intersections in the Post-Physical Archival Landscape

A Case Study at Middle Tennessee State University

Susan W. Knowles

Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) Center for Historic Preservation, Murfreesboro, TN, susan.knowles@mtsu.edu

AbstractThis article traces the development of Southern Places, an online digital collection developed by Middle Tennessee State University’s Center for Historic Preservation (CHP) and the James E. Walker Library for the purpose of creating a digital presence for the Center’s work over the past thirty years. After outlining previous digitization projects undertaken by the CHP in partnership with the Walker Library and other institutions, attention is paid to the technical decisions made in terms of the selection of a content management system and Web hosting, metadata protocols, and the place of shared authority in the contemporary, post-physical archival landscape. The article also describes recent digitization and access efforts at Middle Tennessee State University and partnerships with other universities, libraries, and archives across the state.

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Examining Local History Through Postcards: A Model for Interactive, Inquiry-Based Pedagogy

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Examining Local History Through Postcards

A Model for Interactive, Inquiry-Based Pedagogy

Brian J. Failing

Executive Director, Aurora Regional Fire Museum, Aurora, IL, brian.failing92@gmail.com

AbstractPostcards offer a wealth of information for researchers, teachers and students, and the public. This article documents how postcards can serve as an important form of historical evidence. Further, the article argues that digitizing postcards and making them accessible to wider audiences may yield an opportunity for community engagement with local history and local institutions that may, in turn, help to make local history relevant to teachers’ needs in the 21st-century classroom. In addition to discussing broad information about postcards and their use, the article introduces a digital project, Using Postcards as Historical Evidence, that seeks to highlight the importance and viability of postcards as documentary evidence and appropriate sources for interactive, inquiry-based pedagogy.

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Rediscovering Physical Collections Through the Digital Archive: The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Rediscovering Physical Collections Through the Digital Archive

The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project

Kyle B. Roberts

Assistant Professor of Public History and New Media and Director, Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, kroberts2@luc.edu

AbstractHistoric library collections offer a rich and underexplored resource for teaching undergraduate and graduate students about new digital approaches, methodologies, and platforms. Their scope and scale can make them difficult to analyze in their physical form, but remediated onto a digital platform, they offer valuable insights into the process of archive creation and the importance of making their content available to audiences that cannot normally access it. The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project (JLPP) was launched by students, faculty, and library professionals in 2014 to create an online archive of marks of ownership—bookplates, stamps, inscriptions—contained within books from the original library collection of St. Ignatius College, precursor to Loyola University Chicago. The project grew out of student work for a university museum exhibition commemorating the bi-centennial of the restoration of the Society of Jesus (more commonly known as the Jesuits). Utilizing the popular social media image-sharing site Flickr, the JLPP seeks to foster a participatory community of students, scholars, collectors, and the broader public interested in the history of early and modern Catholic print and the intellectual framework and approach of 19th-century Jesuit education. Initially intended to provide students with the chance to learn how to conceptualize, plan, and build a digital archive, the JLPP has proven equally effective for teaching about digital scholarship, shared authority, and, rather unexpectedly, about the materiality of collections in the digital age

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Introduction to Focus Issue: Collections in a Digital Age

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Introduction to Focus Issue

Collections in a Digital Age
Lauren TiltonVisiting Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA, LTilton@richmond.edu
Brent M. Rogers
Historian and Documentary Editor, The Joseph Smith Papers, brentrogers2121@gmail.comIn Spring 2015, a working group engaged in questions at the intersection of digital and public history at the annual National Council on Public History (NCPH) meeting held in Nashville, Tennessee. The vibrant discussion focused on the exciting and important ways by which public historians make digital, public history. Because a significant amount of work has centered on digitizing and augmenting historical archives, this special issue explores digital approaches to physical collections. Inflected by the contributors’ positioning in public history, the issue highlights how digital approaches are shaped by questions of access, audience, collaboration, interpretation, and materiality. From that discussion in Nashville arose another conversation to convey some of the practical challenges, decisions, applications, and opportunities as experienced by working group discussants. It seemed then, and with the collection of articles in this issue it is even more apparent that the lessons learned by working group discussants are widely applicable to practitioners of public history and digital history, and public, digital history.

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From Bookshelves to the City Streets: Church Histories and the Mapping of Chicago’s Religious Diversity

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

From Bookshelves to the City Streets

Church Histories and the Mapping of Chicago’s Religious Diversity

Christopher D. Cantwell

Assistant Professor of Public History and Religious Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, cantwellcd@umkc.edu

AbstractIn 2013 the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture at the Newberry Library in Chicago undertook an initiative to expand the use of its collection of church and synagogue records through a new digital project titled Faith in the City: Chicago’s Religious Diversity in the Era of the World’s Fair. Though recent scholarship in the study of religion has highlighted the importance of such documents in understanding the contours of American religious life, the collection’s origins as a genealogical resource have long shaped its use. By locating curated portions of the library’s church histories on a digital map of the city alongside nearly two dozen essays on Chicago’s religious history, Faith in the City aims to publicize the collection to new communities of users while also enhancing how local and family historians engage with the material. The following case study provides an overview of Faith in the City’s development, the interventions it hopes to make, as well as challenges the platform faced. It concludes by briefly considering the potential of map-based presentations of cultural heritage collections.

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Sparking Rural Community Dialogues with Digital Oral Histories

Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Sparking Rural Community Dialogues with Digital Oral Histories

William S. Walker

Cooperstown Graduate Program, SUNY Oneonta, Cooperstown, NY, william.walker@oneonta.edu

AbstractIn the past, oral history recordings often lay inert and ignored on archival or library shelves. The digital revolution has transformed accessibility to oral histories, primarily by opening digital archives to a variety of users. Nevertheless, many audiences, particularly in rural areas, still do not engage with these digital archives. By incorporating digital oral history content into public programs, however, public historians can involve their audiences in community dialogues that connect past and present and open new avenues for engaging with challenging contemporary issues. This approach employs the dialogue methodology of the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience and has been successfully implemented in rural central New York State. Collecting with the intention of incorporating oral histories into community dialogue programs shifts the focus from static preservation and exhibition to a dynamic model of sharing authority, which directly engages one’s local community.

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