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Bibliography and Sources

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Bibliography and Sources

For Further Reading

Beviglia, Jim. 2015. “Behind the Song: The Grateful Dead, ‘Ripple.’” American Songwriter: The Craft of Music. September 29, 2015, http://americansongwriter.com/2015/09/behind-the-song-the-grateful-dead-ripple.

Browne, David. 2015. “Grateful Dead’s Robert Hunter on Jerry’s Final Days: ‘We Were Brothers,’ Part 2.” Rolling Stone. March 11, 2015, www.rollingstone.com/music/features/grateful-deads-robert-hunter-on-jerrys-final-days-we-were-brothers-20150311.

Carr, Revell. 2010. “Where All the Pages Are My Days: Metacantric Moments in Deadhead Lyrical Experience.” In The Grateful Dead in Concert: Essays on Live Improvisation, ed. Jim Tuedio and Stan Spector, 107–17. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

Dasaro, Daniel J., and Christian Crumlish. 2017. “The Dead’s Three Decades of ‘Dancin’ in the Streets’ (1966–1987).” March 24, 2018, http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2017/03/dancin-in-streets-guest-post.html.

Dodd, David. 2005. The Complete Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics. New York: Free Press.

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Online Grateful Dead Resources

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Online Grateful Dead Resources

In writing this book, we’ve been helped immensely by the work of others that is available on the internet. This page lists many of those resources. To fully inform yourself about the Grateful Dead, these are recommended places to start. Of course, you can simply google “Grateful Dead,” and you’ll find more than 12,000,000 results!

All Grateful Dead Original Song Debuts

A wonderful Archive.org list of every debut live performance of original Dead tunes with direct links to the debut performances. (Resources #1)

Allmusic.com

Although it’s not exclusively Grateful Dead, this site offers a thorough Dead discography and song list, among other items of interest. (Resources #2)

Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics by David Dodd

Dodd’s site has a terrific section on the Dead’s song lyrics as well as discographies for the band and musicians. No cover songs at this site. (Resources #3)

Archive.org

Complete set lists for most every Dead show with reviews, highlights, and streaming. (Resources #4)

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Bonus Tracks

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Bonus Tracks

There you have it—the Grateful Dead’s 100 essential songs. We had many, many discussions about what constitutes the essential Dead playlist, and now you’ve seen—and hopefully listened to—the list we agreed upon. Finishing this discussion of the Dead’s music, it’s important to remember that there’s no objective list of “best” or “essential” songs or concerts. Listening to music is a purely subjective experience. This was clear after every live Grateful Dead concert, as fans left and the discussions among them began. Although there was often agreement on the overall performance or even on specific songs, it was never unanimous—never! So having listed our “essential” songs, we know we’ll be asked why “Day Job” wasn’t included (just kidding!) or why we did include “Days Between.” We’ve given it our best shot. Now it’s time for you to join the discussion.

But before that discussion picks up speed, we’re adding a few “bonus tracks,” as the band did on many official releases after 1995. These are songs that almost made the top 100 but were left out for one reason or another. Many didn’t make the cut because of our earlier decisions about cover songs, for example, which we outlined in the introduction. Others, original songs, may have been pushed out because of the cover songs we did include or because their performances were limited.

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The 100 Essential Songs

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The 100 Essential Songs

“Alabama Getaway”

Simply put, “Alabama Getaway” (aka Alabama), composed by Jerry Garcia and Robert Hunter, is a rocker. From November 4, 1979, in Providence, Rhode Island, through June 2, 1995, in Mountain View, California, the Grateful Dead played Alabama as a rollicking, fast-paced, get-up-and-dance song. They played it 141 times in all, and eighty-eight of those occurred in its first three years between its first performance in 1979 and the end of 1981. In 1980 alone, the Dead performed Alabama fifty times in their eighty-six shows; only “Drumz” and “Althea” were performed more frequently.

Alabama was often the opening song in the first set: between March 13, 1982, and March 27, 1987, forty-seven consecutive performances of Alabama were show openers. After 1987, Alabama performances tapered off in frequency, and it was not played at all for 416 shows between 1989 and early 1995. In 1995, the Dead played Alabama four times, twice as the show’s opening number, including at its final performance on June 2, 1995. In short, “Alabama Getaway” had a relatively short but intense life in the Dead’s repertoire.

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Quick Start Guide

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Quick Start Guide

The Grateful Dead were known for the variety of musical genres they incorporated into their musical style. For readers who might like to experience some of this variety before exploring the list of 100 essential songs, this Quick Start Guide is the place to begin. If you are unfamiliar with the Dead’s musical eclecticism, first read the lyrics to these songs at dead.net. All of the links in this table are to live performances, and all appear later in the book with additional details.

Genre

Song and Date

Link

Folk

“Peggy-O” (May 7, 1977)

Q.S. #1

Rock and Roll

“One More Saturday Night” (April 8, 1972)

Q.S. #2

Bluegrass

“Cumberland Blues” (March 28, 1973)

Q.S. #3

Country Rock

“Mexicali Blues” (April 2, 1973)

Q.S. #4

Jazz

“Eyes of the World” (March 29, 1990)

Q.S. #5

Classic Dead

“Sugaree” (August 13, 1975)

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Reconstructing the Lansdowne Collection of Classical Marbles, Volume II: Catalogue

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Archives and Special Collections at the University of La Verne

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Archives and Special Collections at the University of La Verne

Putting the Repository of a Small Liberal Arts College to Work Online

Benjamin Jenkins

Archivist, Wilson Library, and Assistant Professor and Director of Public History Program, Department of History and Political Science, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA; bjenkins@laverne.edu

Keren Darancette

Research and Instruction Librarian, Wilson Library, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA; kdarancette@laverne.edu

Abstract Archives and Special Collections at the Wilson Library of the University of La Verne, located in inland southern California, offers an informative case study of descriptive practices and metadata attached to digital collections at a small liberal arts college. Since recruiting a staff specifically tasked to manage the archives, the Wilson Library has increased the number of collections available to patrons online through the creation of a digital collections Web page. Digitized, hosted collections include the papers of a faculty member from the early 20th century, photographs of early La Verne, historic local newspapers, and manuscript sources regarding Japanese American internment. Metadata fields at Wilson Library have developed to encompass a greater variety of contextual information about digitized records, improving users’ ability to put the collections to use for research. Ultimately, this case study demonstrates what a library at a small university can accomplish with a dedicated staff and a clear objective, even with limited resources.

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African Art at The Kreeger Museum

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

African Art at The Kreeger Museum

Validating a Collection and Its Historic Stakeholders

Antonia Dapena-Tretter

School and Outreach Manager, The Walt Disney Family Museum, San Francisco, CA; antonia@maybeorange.com

Eloise Pelton

Archivist, The Kreeger Museum, Washington, D.C.; research@kreegermuseum.org

Abstract Written by The Kreeger Museum’s former head of education and its founding archivist, this article looks closely at provenance and makes use of primary source documents and photographs to relive the rich story of how The Kreeger Museum’s African art collection came to be. A detailed account of the negotiations, communications, transactions, and circulations of people, objects, and ideas—the following narrative offers an interesting case study into the early European and American art collectors’ circuit.

Consisting of 28 art objects from at least 17 different West African cultures, The Kreeger Museum’s African collection is small but remarkably comprehensive and mostly the result of David Lloyd Kreeger’s choice to use Warren Robbins (1923–2008)—founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art—as his primary adviser. Purchased within the relatively short time frame of seven years, this important subcollection of the larger Kreeger Museum holdings reflects more than the financial success that made it possible, roughly defined by David Kreeger’s most profitable years at the Government Employees Insurance Company (better known by its acronym, GEICO).1 It also reveals a noteworthy appreciation of non-Western art, fostered during the collector’s years at Rutgers University (1925–1929), where he majored in political science and economics. As Kreeger built his collection, questions of authenticity were answered by tracing provenance back to notable European collectors or, in some rare instances, African soil and the precise moment of the object’s appropriation into Western hands. To shine a light on the history of the museum’s African holdings is to simultaneously illuminate a network of seemingly disparate connections—Dr. Albert Barnes (1872–1951), Paul Guillaume (1891–1934), and Helena Rubinstein (1872–1965)—and the colonial past that tied them and the larger Western tradition of collecting African art together.

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Voila!

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Voila!

The Rockefeller Archive Center’s Exhibit Creation Process

Marissa Vassari

Archivist and Educator, Rockefeller Archive Center, 15 Dayton Avenue, Sleepy Hollow, NY; mvassari@rockarch.org

Abstract The Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC) in Sleepy Hollow, New York, hosts groups ranging from foundation staff to college-level classes. Over the course of a year, the RAC hosts approximately 30 visiting groups that include from as few as 10 people to as many as 45. The aim is to engage visiting groups with the RAC’s vast collections by creating hands-on, tailored exhibits. The RAC has created policies and procedures, exhibit guides, and workflow templates that allow for documentation of each exhibit and encourage inclusiveness and transparency among staff. Employing a new, standardized approach by using these tools has made all phases of the exhibit process more efficient and allows the RAC to provide a rich, immersive archival experience for visitors. This article offers a case study in standardized exhibit creation that may benefit professionals in other institutions who are seeking to develop work processes and policies without diminishing the visitor experience.

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The Money Museum of the Deutsche Bundesbank

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Medium 9781538119952

The Anatomy of a Museum

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Challenging the “Love of Possessions”

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Challenging the “Love of Possessions”

Repatriation of Sacred Objects in the United States and Canada

Jennifer L. Dekker

MA Candidate, St. Paul University, 65 University Private, Room 105, Ottawa, ON, Canada; jdekker@uottawa.ca

Abstract In 1990, the United States passed the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), requiring the repatriation of ancestral remains, funerary, and sacred objects from museums to source communities. Since then, hundreds of thousands of repatriations have occurred, allowing for respectful treatment of ancestors and reconnections to spiritual, communal practice, and ceremony. In Canada, repatriation has been recommended by the Assembly of First Nations, the Canadian Museum Association, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but there is no federal law. Does Canada have a functioning alternative? This examination provides a comparison of how repatriation differs in the two countries, demonstrating that case-by-case negotiations in Canada currently allow for more flexibility and customization to the needs of different Indigenous communities but that the transparency, coordination, and funding associated with NAGPRA would be a significant benefit to claimants in Canada.

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Reconstructing the Lansdowne Collection of Classical Marbles, Volume I: History

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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The Care of Prints and Drawings

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Medium 9781538106235

Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, and Museums

Decker, Juilee; Collections Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Review

Museums and Innovations

Edited by Zvjezdana Antos, Annette B. Fromm, and Viv Golding. New Castle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017. 249 pages. ISBN: 9781443812689.

Reviewed by Kirsten Belisle, Collections Manager, Dubois Museum & Wind River Historical Center, 909 W. Rams Horn St., Dubois, WY; kirsten.belisle.a@gmail.com

An aptly titled book, Museums and Innovations brings together 16 essays that unite theories with practical applications for exhibition construction as related to increasing meaning making in a globalized world. These essays discuss how demands placed on the museum field by ever-evolving societies have created the need for a new museology focused on moral activism and deeper community engagement. Each essay stresses the idea that museums must address each group of people in their communities—be they part of the majority, minority, resident, or migrant populations—through exhibitions. In addition, the constant theme of innovation and the critical approach to current museology make up for the occasional paragraph in this book overburdened by colloquial terms and jargon. Still, this book’s strength lies in the extremely detailed case studies included in each essay that provide extensive overviews of problems faced by these institutions and the ultimate solutions they created in their quest to serve their communities.

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