217 Articles
Medium 9781538101391

Crossroads and Intersections in the Post-Physical Archival Landscape: A Case Study at Middle Tennessee State University

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Crossroads and Intersections in the Post-Physical Archival Landscape

A Case Study at Middle Tennessee State University

Susan W. Knowles

Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) Center for Historic Preservation, Murfreesboro, TN, susan.knowles@mtsu.edu

AbstractThis article traces the development of Southern Places, an online digital collection developed by Middle Tennessee State University’s Center for Historic Preservation (CHP) and the James E. Walker Library for the purpose of creating a digital presence for the Center’s work over the past thirty years. After outlining previous digitization projects undertaken by the CHP in partnership with the Walker Library and other institutions, attention is paid to the technical decisions made in terms of the selection of a content management system and Web hosting, metadata protocols, and the place of shared authority in the contemporary, post-physical archival landscape. The article also describes recent digitization and access efforts at Middle Tennessee State University and partnerships with other universities, libraries, and archives across the state.

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Examining Local History Through Postcards: A Model for Interactive, Inquiry-Based Pedagogy

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Examining Local History Through Postcards

A Model for Interactive, Inquiry-Based Pedagogy

Brian J. Failing

Executive Director, Aurora Regional Fire Museum, Aurora, IL, brian.failing92@gmail.com

AbstractPostcards offer a wealth of information for researchers, teachers and students, and the public. This article documents how postcards can serve as an important form of historical evidence. Further, the article argues that digitizing postcards and making them accessible to wider audiences may yield an opportunity for community engagement with local history and local institutions that may, in turn, help to make local history relevant to teachers’ needs in the 21st-century classroom. In addition to discussing broad information about postcards and their use, the article introduces a digital project, Using Postcards as Historical Evidence, that seeks to highlight the importance and viability of postcards as documentary evidence and appropriate sources for interactive, inquiry-based pedagogy.

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Rediscovering Physical Collections Through the Digital Archive: The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Rediscovering Physical Collections Through the Digital Archive

The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project

Kyle B. Roberts

Assistant Professor of Public History and New Media and Director, Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, kroberts2@luc.edu

AbstractHistoric library collections offer a rich and underexplored resource for teaching undergraduate and graduate students about new digital approaches, methodologies, and platforms. Their scope and scale can make them difficult to analyze in their physical form, but remediated onto a digital platform, they offer valuable insights into the process of archive creation and the importance of making their content available to audiences that cannot normally access it. The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project (JLPP) was launched by students, faculty, and library professionals in 2014 to create an online archive of marks of ownership—bookplates, stamps, inscriptions—contained within books from the original library collection of St. Ignatius College, precursor to Loyola University Chicago. The project grew out of student work for a university museum exhibition commemorating the bi-centennial of the restoration of the Society of Jesus (more commonly known as the Jesuits). Utilizing the popular social media image-sharing site Flickr, the JLPP seeks to foster a participatory community of students, scholars, collectors, and the broader public interested in the history of early and modern Catholic print and the intellectual framework and approach of 19th-century Jesuit education. Initially intended to provide students with the chance to learn how to conceptualize, plan, and build a digital archive, the JLPP has proven equally effective for teaching about digital scholarship, shared authority, and, rather unexpectedly, about the materiality of collections in the digital age

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Introduction to Focus Issue: Collections in a Digital Age

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Introduction to Focus Issue

Collections in a Digital Age
Lauren TiltonVisiting Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA, LTilton@richmond.edu
Brent M. Rogers
Historian and Documentary Editor, The Joseph Smith Papers, brentrogers2121@gmail.comIn Spring 2015, a working group engaged in questions at the intersection of digital and public history at the annual National Council on Public History (NCPH) meeting held in Nashville, Tennessee. The vibrant discussion focused on the exciting and important ways by which public historians make digital, public history. Because a significant amount of work has centered on digitizing and augmenting historical archives, this special issue explores digital approaches to physical collections. Inflected by the contributors’ positioning in public history, the issue highlights how digital approaches are shaped by questions of access, audience, collaboration, interpretation, and materiality. From that discussion in Nashville arose another conversation to convey some of the practical challenges, decisions, applications, and opportunities as experienced by working group discussants. It seemed then, and with the collection of articles in this issue it is even more apparent that the lessons learned by working group discussants are widely applicable to practitioners of public history and digital history, and public, digital history.

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From Bookshelves to the City Streets: Church Histories and the Mapping of Chicago’s Religious Diversity

Collections; Juilee Decker Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

From Bookshelves to the City Streets

Church Histories and the Mapping of Chicago’s Religious Diversity

Christopher D. Cantwell

Assistant Professor of Public History and Religious Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, cantwellcd@umkc.edu

AbstractIn 2013 the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture at the Newberry Library in Chicago undertook an initiative to expand the use of its collection of church and synagogue records through a new digital project titled Faith in the City: Chicago’s Religious Diversity in the Era of the World’s Fair. Though recent scholarship in the study of religion has highlighted the importance of such documents in understanding the contours of American religious life, the collection’s origins as a genealogical resource have long shaped its use. By locating curated portions of the library’s church histories on a digital map of the city alongside nearly two dozen essays on Chicago’s religious history, Faith in the City aims to publicize the collection to new communities of users while also enhancing how local and family historians engage with the material. The following case study provides an overview of Faith in the City’s development, the interventions it hopes to make, as well as challenges the platform faced. It concludes by briefly considering the potential of map-based presentations of cultural heritage collections.

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