2 Articles
Medium 9781475824476

General Article

Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Holly Victor
Steven G. Little
Angeleque Akin-Little

ABSTRACT: Self-modeling is a cognitive–behavioral procedure that uses the individual as a model. Self-modeling is used to teach and strengthen desired behaviors while reducing or eliminating problematic ones. In video self-modeling, the participant is shown video footage of himself or herself engaging in appropriate behaviors in settings that tend to trigger problematic ones. The ultimate goal is to have the participant imitate the self he or she sees on tape. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of video self-modeling for increasing the social engaged time of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders in a school setting. A multiple-baseline design across participants (n = 2) was used to evaluate response to the intervention. Results indicated that both participants responded positively to the self-modeling intervention. Furthermore, responses were relatively quick, and gains were maintained after the intervention was withdrawn. These findings suggest that video self-modeling is an effective means for improving social engaged time in children with autism spectrum disorders.

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Medium 9781475824476

SPECIAL ISSUE: Response to Intervention

Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Kristin N. Johnson
Guest Editor

There have been many articles addressing aspects of response to intervention (RtI), such as specific interventions, curriculum-based measurement, and universal screening, but few have addressed RtI as a holistic, comprehensive system whose purpose is to not only address a specific skill or behavioral deficit but also promote changes in the overall system (e.g., leadership, teams, data-based decision making). The editor and authors of the issue hope that their examinations of these issues will stimulate dialogue and encourage research on these dimensions of RtI in a holistic fashion. The first article draws attention to implementation of RtI as a comprehensive and interdependent set of practices. The authors (Johnson et al.) suggest that if any element of the RtI system is missing, the likelihood for the process to fail is enhanced. The authors describe a measure developed to communicate to leaders how the essential elements of RtI work together to support student achievement and continuous improvement at each tier. Implementation guidelines on using the measure are provided.

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