470 Articles
Medium 9781475837537

RL_002 - Brown et al. FINAL

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Challenges of Differentiating Instruction for ELLs

An Analysis of Content-Area Lesson Plans Produced by Pre-service Language Arts and Social Studies Teachers

Clara Lee Brown and Rachel Endo

Abstract: This study addressed the challenges of differentiating instruction for ELLs at the pre-service level through an analysis of non-ESL teacher candidates’ work samples. Randomly selected lesson plans in K-12 Language Arts/English and Social Studies were content-analyzed to investigate the types and characteristics of accommodation, differentiation, and provisions provided for ELLs. The findings revealed the following trends: (1) the candidates often conflated ELL characteristics with learning disabilities, (2) stated differentiation strategies were generic without carefully scaffolded and sequenced strategies; and (3) when provided, differentiations for ELLs only provided surface-level accommodations that did not address building academic language or connecting content with prior knowledge. Implications are offered for practice and theory.

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Medium 9781475837537

RL_008 - Hill FINAL

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

A Pre-service Teacher’s Use of a Culturally Relevant Text with Interracial Themes

K. Dara Hill

Abstract: This study examined a pre-service teacher’s use of a culturally relevant text with interracial themes for a first grade student. This exploration occurred in an urban primary school that did not otherwise recognize the student’s dual heritage. Journal documentation and field notes reveal the pre-service teacher’s selection of the text, her use of reading strategies and comprehension questions to engage the student and support her racial identity. Results suggest a need for pre- and in-service teacher development to understand and support the identity development of biracial children.

Introduction

Biracial children are among the fastest growing population in the United States (Baxley, 2008). As schools are enrolling a precipitous influx of biracial children, most teachers have had little or no training for teaching them (Morrison & Bordere, 2001). Biracial children traditionally have not fit into established societal race classifications (Boyd, 2011) and are slowly acknowledged among monoracial groups and in academia (Baxley, 2008, Root, 1996, Wardle, 2007). As a response to growing concerns about effectively teaching biracial children, many scholars have provided background that necessitates teacher preparation and conceptualized classroom strategies that promote racial and ethnic development. While preparing teachers for diversity and multiracial schools is very well documented (Sleeter, 2001), little is reported about revising teacher preparation to incorporate biracial children.

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Medium 9781475837537

RL_007 - Lowery FINAL

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Common Sense and Scientific Interpretation of Cultural Relevance

Charles L. Lowery

Abstract: This article endeavors to view culturally relevant pedagogies from a fundamental view of the relationship between such practices and a model of scholar–practitioner educational leadership. Specifically, this work, framed as an extension of a larger phenomenological study, attempts to address the understanding of cultural relevance from two finite provinces of meaning and distinct ways of knowing a given phenomenon. These ways of knowing—drawn from the phenomenological and social work of Alfred Schutz (1967)—are the scientific interpretations of human interactions and the commonsense understanding of an object as it occurs in the everyday experiences of the life-world. Specifically, this article attempts to consider both the scientific understanding of cultural relevance and the ways in which that understanding informs or fails to inform culturally relevant practices in American schools.

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Medium 9781475837537

RL_003 - Plata et al. FINAL

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Prospective Teachers’ Beliefs in Factors Negatively Influencing African American, Low-Income Anglo, and Hispanic Students’ Academic Achievement

Maximino Plata, Alaric A. Williams, and Tracy B. Henley

Abstract: Four hundred and five preservice teachers enrolled at two Southwestern universities identified three factors that were believed to negatively influence the academic achievement of African American, Hispanic, and low-income Anglo elementary students. Chi-square Test for k Independent Samples indicated no significant differences in frequency of factor selection by prospective teachers for students grouped across college classification. However, analyses of factor selection by classification status showed that some factors were selected at a significantly higher frequency for one group over the others. Overall, data suggest that teachers in training are holding to preconceptions and not always evolving on matters of diversity. Implications for teacher preparation programs are extensively discussed.

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Medium 9781475837537

RL_011 - Zhang FINAl

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Book Review

Preparing Classroom Teachers to Succeed with Second Language Learners: Lessons from A Faculty Learning Community

Thomas H. Levine, Elizabeth R. Howard,
and David M. Moss

(New York, NY: Routledge, 2014)

252 pages, $160.00 (Hardback). ISBN13: 978-0-415-84116-0.

Wenli Zhang

cContemporary studies in teacher education draw upon the tendency to focus more on the development of highly qualified pre-service teachers, with assumptions held by many teacher education programs that knowledge can be transferred to practitioners’ minds and subsequently enacted to practice. Problematizing traditional and commonly adopted professional development approaches, Webster-Wright (2009) notes that recent research on professional development calls for continuous professional learning (CPL, Webster-Wright, 2009, p. 704). The edited volume, Preparing Classroom Teachers to Succeed with Second Language Learners: Lessons from a Faculty Learning Community, specifically focuses on faculty learning and development, arguing for the equal importance of developing faculty capacity and raising awareness of the urgency to put efforts on faculty learning as well. Realizing and responding to the call for CPL (Webster-Wright, 2009), the faculty learning community described in this journal sets up to provide sustained and collaborative support for faculty members’ professional development, with a particular focus on the education of emergent bilinguals. This volume emphasizes the mutual benefits that both faculty members and pre-service teachers can garner from such experiences, indicating that faculty learning and pre-service teacher learning can occur concurrently.

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