843 Articles
Medium 9781475832143

The Dynamic Roots of School Leaders’ Twitter Use: A Structurational Perspective on Technology Use

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

VINCENT CHO

VIRGINIA SNODGRASS RANGEL

The Dynamic Roots of School Leaders’ Twitter Use

A Structurational Perspective on Technology Use

ABSTRACT: Some postulate that social media tools, such as Twitter, might be used to support educator professional learning. Drawing upon interviews and tweets from 17 school administrators, this study examined the factors and consequences of administrators’ Twitter use. It finds that administrators’ understandings and uses of Twitter changed over time, subject to influences such as interactions with colleagues, one’s sense of online visibility, and abilities to develop workarounds for Twitter’s limitations. The discussion explores issues relating to the future of educators’ social media use, as well as how to theorize about the implementation and adoption of technologies in education.

KEY WORDS: Principals, Social Media, Structuration Theory, Technology

Much of the charm associated with Web 2.0 (e.g., blogs, wikis, social media) derive from hopes around its capacity to distribute information. Today, people can consume, create, and share online content, from almost anywhere and with almost anyone. For instance, arguments that Web 2.0 might be used to support professional learning have become increasingly commonplace (Gunawardena et al., 2009; Hung, 2002; Johnson, 2001). Among such claims, there has been strong enthusiasm for how Twitter may serve as a tool for connecting educators (Burden, 2010; Carpenter & Krutka, 2014; Richardson & Mancabelli, 2011). Such connections could especially benefit school administrators, since they may struggle with professional isolation (Barkley & Becker, 2013; Dussault & Thibodeau, 1997; Cho, 2016) .

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Medium 9781475832143

Principals’ Technology Leadership: How a Conceptual Framework Shaped a Mixed Methods Study

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

BARBARA BROWN

MICHELE JACOBSEN

Principals’ Technology Leadership

How a Conceptual Framework Shaped a Mixed Methods Study

ABSTRACT: A multifaceted conceptual framework of principals’ technology leadership informed the design of a mixed methods case study exploring leadership practices across three school jurisdictions in Alberta, Canada. Leadership practices of K-12 school principals involved in making school-wide improvements integrating technology were examined. The intent of this article is to discuss how the conceptual framework influenced the research process as an interconnection of learning theory based on the learning sciences, transformative knowledge-building pedagogies, and the complexities for school leaders as they cultivate a growth-oriented culture. Findings are related to three key areas: (1) leadership preparation is needed in instructional leadership and technological fluency; (2) online networks can support professional learning; and (3) practitioner–researcher partnerships can support innovation in schools.

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Medium 9781475832143

“Obviously, That Worked”: Examining Links between Data Use and Classroom Instruction

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

MICHELLE D. VAN LARE

“Obviously, That Worked”

Examining Links between Data Use and Classroom Instruction

ABSTRACT: Ever-growing expectations exist for educators to use assessments to collect, analyze, and interpret data, but how, if at all, are these processes affecting instruction? This descriptive case study of one team of second grade teachers offers an analysis of the links between teachers’ use of data within their collaborative team meetings and instructional decisions in the classroom. Findings illustrate three activities that linked teacher discussions and instruction in classrooms: troubleshooting and normalizing expectations, targeting instruction, and identifying what worked. While these links tightly coupled teachers’ collaborative use of data and assessments with their classroom instruction, they did so by prioritizing isolated instructional responses focused on discrete skills and specific instructional strategies. Implications include building structures that reframe what teachers mean by “worked” when inquiring into student learning.

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Medium 9781475832143

Education Policy in Leadership Practice: “Accountability Talk” in Schools

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

REBECCA LOWENHAUPT

JAMES P. SPILLANE

TIM HALLETT

Education Policy in Leadership Practice

“Accountability Talk” in Schools

ABSTRACT: Over the last few decades, high-stakes accountability has become commonplace in education policy both in the United States and internationally. In this paper, we consider the role of school leaders and “accountability talk” in implementing this shift through a case study of one urban school principal’s talk during a period of reform. Consistent with broader policy discourses, the 650 instances of principal rhetoric in 14 elementary school meetings reflected issues of standardization and assessment through rational appeals to logic (logos). However, the principal’s “accountability talk” also relied on rhetorical sequences that wove these rational appeals together with moral (ethos) and emotional (pathos) claims, thereby connecting the accountability paradigm to more established discourses associated with the educational profession. We argue that school principal’s talk is a primary means through which broader institutional changes and local work practices become coupled together, often in ways that blend apparently competing models of organization. As such, accountability talk should be of both empirical and theoretical interest for scholars studying school leadership and education reform.

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Medium 9781475832143

Development and Validation of an Instrument to Assess Teacher Leadership Behaviors in a Math–Science Partnership Program

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

NITHYA DORAISWAMY

KRISTEN M. PORTER

GRANT WILSON

PETER PAPRZYCKI

CHARLENE M. CZERNIAK

NICOLE TUTTLE

KEVIN CZAJKOWSKI

Development and Validation of an Instrument to Assess Teacher Leadership Behaviors in a Math–Science Partnership Program

ABSTRACT: This paper describes the development and validation of a science teacher leadership instrument modeled on the seven domains of the Teacher Leader Model (TLM) Standards (The Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium, 2011). Instrument development was part of National Science Foundation–funded Mathematics and Science Partnership (MSP) program that aimed to develop science teacher leaders through the use of Project-Based Science (PBS) in the context of renewable energy. Ratings of professional development sessions presented by teacher leaders to their peers were analyzed to assess whether the instrument could be used to measure teacher leadership in this context. The resulting TLM Standards Instrument is presented as a valid instrument to observe the development and assessment of teacher leadership.

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