257 Articles
Medium 9781538119969

Overcoming Legacy Processing in Photographic Collections through Collaboration and Digital Technologies

Decker, Juilee Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Overcoming Legacy Processing in Photographic Collections through Collaboration and Digital Technologies

Terri Holtze

Head of Web Services, University of Louisville, Ekstrom Library, Louisville, KY; terri.holtze@louisville.edu

Rachel Howard

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Louisville, Archives and Special Collections, Louisville, KY; rachel.howard@louisville.edu

Randy Kuehn

Digital Technologies Systems Librarian, University of Louisville, Ekstrom Library, Louisville, KY; randy.kuehn@louisville.edu

Rebecca Pattillo

Metadata Librarian, University of Louisville, Archives and Special Collections, Louisville, KY; rebecca.pattillo@louisville.edu

Elizabeth Reilly

Curator, Photographic Archives, University of Louisville, Archives and Special Collections, Louisville, KY; elizabeth.reilly@louisville.edu

Abstract In the 1960s, a Louisville photography studio began donating its negatives, prints, and invoices to the University of Louisville Photographic Archives. The Caufield & Shook collection remains a significant primary source for local history and a prime candidate for digitization. Unfortunately, on its receipt, nonarchivists processed the collection with little documentation of original order or organizational decision making. Additionally, workflow choices were determined largely by the desire to maximize student labor. In 2017, the digital initiatives librarian worked with in-house application developers and archives staff to create a workflow that has significantly sped up the process of making this valuable photographic collection accessible online. This article describes how archivists recovered from the poor processing decisions, used technology to enhance the digitization workflow, and developed a list of best practices for future processing and digitization of large photographic collections.

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Medium 9781538119952

Archives and Special Collections at the University of La Verne

Decker, Juilee Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Archives and Special Collections at the University of La Verne

Putting the Repository of a Small Liberal Arts College to Work Online

Benjamin Jenkins

Archivist, Wilson Library, and Assistant Professor and Director of Public History Program, Department of History and Political Science, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA; bjenkins@laverne.edu

Keren Darancette

Research and Instruction Librarian, Wilson Library, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA; kdarancette@laverne.edu

Abstract Archives and Special Collections at the Wilson Library of the University of La Verne, located in inland southern California, offers an informative case study of descriptive practices and metadata attached to digital collections at a small liberal arts college. Since recruiting a staff specifically tasked to manage the archives, the Wilson Library has increased the number of collections available to patrons online through the creation of a digital collections Web page. Digitized, hosted collections include the papers of a faculty member from the early 20th century, photographs of early La Verne, historic local newspapers, and manuscript sources regarding Japanese American internment. Metadata fields at Wilson Library have developed to encompass a greater variety of contextual information about digitized records, improving users’ ability to put the collections to use for research. Ultimately, this case study demonstrates what a library at a small university can accomplish with a dedicated staff and a clear objective, even with limited resources.

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Medium 9781538106235

The Special Collections Handbook, Second Edition

Decker, Juilee Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Review

Museums and Innovations

Edited by Zvjezdana Antos, Annette B. Fromm, and Viv Golding. New Castle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017. 249 pages. ISBN: 9781443812689.

Reviewed by Kirsten Belisle, Collections Manager, Dubois Museum & Wind River Historical Center, 909 W. Rams Horn St., Dubois, WY; kirsten.belisle.a@gmail.com

An aptly titled book, Museums and Innovations brings together 16 essays that unite theories with practical applications for exhibition construction as related to increasing meaning making in a globalized world. These essays discuss how demands placed on the museum field by ever-evolving societies have created the need for a new museology focused on moral activism and deeper community engagement. Each essay stresses the idea that museums must address each group of people in their communities—be they part of the majority, minority, resident, or migrant populations—through exhibitions. In addition, the constant theme of innovation and the critical approach to current museology make up for the occasional paragraph in this book overburdened by colloquial terms and jargon. Still, this book’s strength lies in the extremely detailed case studies included in each essay that provide extensive overviews of problems faced by these institutions and the ultimate solutions they created in their quest to serve their communities.

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Medium 9781538106235

Collections Care Informed by Native American Perspectives

Decker, Juilee Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Collections Care Informed by Native American Perspectives

Teaching the Next Generation

Jennifer Shannon

Curator and Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Boulder, CO; jshannon@colorado.edu

Abstract Through repatriation consultations, collaborative exhibitions, and research projects with Native peoples, anthropology curators and collections managers are learning different interpretations of best practice in the care of Native American collections. In this case study of the Museum and Field Studies (MFS) program at the University of Colorado, Boulder, we review the practice and potential of bringing those perspectives to bear on the next generation of anthropology collections managers. Through examples of traditional care, exhibits, course work, and student projects, we show how Native peoples are influencing how we think about and care for museum collections. We illustrate future collections managers’ increasing sense of purpose and excitement toward working with Native peoples and reimagining the museum to be a resource for increasing Native community well-being and a welcoming place for alternative ways of seeing and relating to the collections in their care.

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Medium 9781538106235

Collections of Historical Markers and Signage and Public Programming Online at Public History Institutions Such as Museums and Archives

Decker, Juilee Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Collections of Historical Markers and Signage and Public Programming Online at Public History Institutions Such as Museums and Archives

Yun Shun Susie Chung

Ph.D., History (Public History) Department, Southern New Hampshire University; y.chung1@snhu.edu

Abstract Historical designations are communicated to audiences through interpretive signage. Historic markers as signage for outdoor interpretation constitute a body of managed outdoor collections. Implications for museum and archive professionals to represent and manage these collections, in addition to applying practices for acclimatized collections, are incorporated in this article. Beyond its location at a particular geographic location, a marker’s information may be disseminated through websites of public history institutions that aim to share information about the historical markers through digitizing records and mapping these through geospatial information systems. This article examines the historical marker applications and databases of public history institutions, many of which are associated with museums and archives, in the United States as a place-based collection, where suggestions by museums and archives professionals can also take part in the committees and applications. Attention is also paid to meeting the needs of diverse audiences through reinterpretation by museums and archives professionals.

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