2763 Articles
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The Rise of Urban AlternativeTeacher Certification

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Rise of Urban AlternativeTeacher Certification

Scott Hohnstein

ABSTRACT: This study sheds light on where teachers with alternative certification are teaching in the United States. Using hierarchical multiple regression, the numbers of alternative certificates granted in 33 U.S. states during the 2008–2009 school year are regressed on the proportions of students in poverty and on the proportions of ethnic minority students in each state. In two additional regression models, the numbers of alternative certificates are regressed on the numbers of rural and urban public schools. Results show that the numbers of rural and urban schools exhibit the strongest statistical relationships with the numbers of alternative teacher certificates. These findings are discussed, as are implications for practice and research.

The National Center for Education Information (NCEI, 2010) indicates that approximately 59,000 individuals were issued an alternative teacher certificate during the 2008–2009 public school year. This is an increase of more than 200% from 1998 to 1999. Due to its quick rise, it is difficult to formulate a concise definition for today’s version of alternative teacher certification (ATC). Its spread has spurred a variety of programs across the United States.

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Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of Working with Learners Who Struggle

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of Working with Learners Who Struggle

Heidi Legg Burross, Amy M. Olson, and Elizabeth Pope

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to use survey vignettes to begin exploring how preservice teachers believe they will respond to students who struggle academically. Thirty-one preservice and first-year teachers responded to three vignettes with their perceptions of (a) the cause of the difficulty and (b) their strategies for working with this and similar students. Participants were drawn from three university preservice teaching programs. Past experiences with academic struggle related to how the participants attributed the causes and solutions in their responses to vignettes. The interaction of perceived past self-struggle with types of struggle within the vignettes revealed experience with struggle as a student affects how preservice teachers consider working with students. Implications of this study include greater understanding of how teacher perceptions of struggle and effort can impact the help they offer students and highlight the need to teach adaptive ways of reconstructing success and failure in preservice programs.

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Perceptions of Teaching Practicums from Thai Students in 4-Year and 5-Year Teacher Education Programs

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Perceptions of Teaching Practicums from Thai Students in 4-Year and 5-Year Teacher Education Programs

Samuel J. Grubbs

ABSTRACT: In 2004, most Thai universities with teacher education programs replaced the existing 4-year program and its semester-long practicum with an extended 5-year program that offers the students a yearlong teaching practicum in local schools. This research surveyed students in both types of programs at the beginning and at the end of teaching practicums to see if those students in the extended program had greater confidence, interest, and dedication to their teaching practice. The results indicate that students in both programs increased their confidence during their practicums. On the posttest, students in the 5-year program had significantly less positive feelings about their teaching practicums. Further support structure is needed to help students in longer practicums deal with the longer commitment to practice teaching.

“In most contemporary societies, the profession of teaching employs more adults than any other occupation requiring a similar level of educational preparation” (Cummings, 1990, p. 3). The requirements to teach in a school can vary drastically by country. In some less developed countries, teachers can finish their training before they are 16 years old (Ghani, 1990). Cobb (1999) notes a list of three common forms of teacher education programs around the world: certificate/diploma programs, bachelor’s degree programs, and master’s/5-year programs. More recently, program standards have increased in many countries recently as a result of political and institutional reforms (Moon, 2007; Steiner-Khamsi, 2004).

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Communities That Engage Multidisciplinary Faculty withService-Learning

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Communities That Engage Multidisciplinary Faculty withService-Learning

Vera L Stenhouse, Caitlin M. Dooley, Rachel Gurvitch, Joseph R. Feinberg, Lydia C. Mays, Janet Z. Burns, and Olga S. Jarrett

ABSTRACT: Although research demonstrates positive outcomes for service-learning in higher education, more research is warranted to fully understand what shapes faculty engagement and implementation of service-learning. A group of 16 multidisciplinary faculty members integrating service-learning in their preparation of educators share their predominant influence: Community engagement. Findings indicate the importance of various community affiliations, including personal, classroom, professional learning, and service communities. The COMPELS faculty aligned with several established trends indicative of supporting enhanced service-learning, such as previous personal experience, participation in a professional community, and allocation of funds. Unique to COMPELS was acknowledging the multiple communities that informed faculty members’ efforts. Theoretical, pedagogical, and institutional implications for teacher education, service-learning, and practice are offered.

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Starting at the Beginning

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Starting at the Beginning

An Intuitive Choice for Classroom Management

Justin D. Garwood, Alene H. Harris, and Jonathan K. Tomick

ABSTRACT: Teachers’ actions in the first 3 days of school set the stage for student success throughout the academic year. Classroom management continues to be one of the more pressing concerns for both preservice and in-service teachers. Recent research in classroom management has identified evidence-based practices, but the research-to-practice gap remains. This study reports on the implementation of a research-based classroom management professional development program focused on the beginning of the school year. To increase teacher buy-in and fidelity of implementation, 22 teachers were trained to deliver the program in their respective schools within a southeastern school district. Results of survey data from 347 teachers suggest that teachers made changes in their approach to starting the school year and that these changes were associated with increased teacher efficacy and fewer off-task and disruptive student behaviors. Implications for professional development and teacher education are discussed.

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