2996 Articles
Medium 9781475836752

Supportive Principals and Black Teacher Turnover

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Ayana Kee Campoli

Supportive Principals and Black Teacher Turnover

ESSA as an Opportunity to Improve Retention

Abstract : In U.S. public schools, the shortage of teachers of African descent specifically, and teachers of color more generally, is a worsening problem that has severe, detrimental effects on students. This shortage of Black teachers is driven in part by high turnover, much of which is precipitated by the poor working conditions in their schools. In this study, I analyze data from a sample of approximately 1,600 Black teachers who participated in the Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS, 2007–2008). My findings about the role of supportive principals have implications for how state departments of education should use Every Student Succeeds Act funds.

Key Words: Teacher Turnover, Principals, Black Teachers, Education Policy, Structural Equation Modeling

The shortage of teachers of color is particularly acute, especially given the rising racial diversity of the student population in U.S. public schools. Half of the nation’s public–school students are White (50%), a quarter are Latina/o (25%), approximately 16% are Black, and another 9% are either Asian American, American Indian, or bi-/multiracial. However, the demographics of the teaching force do not reflect this same diversity, as the vast majority—82%—of public school teachers are White (Snyder, de Brey, & Dillow, 2016).

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Medium 9781475836752

ESSA and School Improvement

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Sheneka M. Williams

Richard O. Welsh

ESSA and School Improvement

Principal1 Preparation and Professional Development in a New Era of Education Policy

Abstract: School leadership, next to teacher quality, plays the largest role in improving the educational outcomes of students. As such, federal and state policies have sought to hold principals accountable for the academic success of their students. Given the renewed attention paid to school leaders and overall school improvement with the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this article examines how district and school capacity to apply for and allocate additional professional development funds provided by ESSA might vary according to school context. We utilize qualitative interview data and the literature pertaining to ESSA to interpret how the new federal education policy might affect the preparation and development of principals and how ESSA might expand the social and economic divide that exists between and within districts. We find that while flexibility and autonomy might be key components of ESSA, under-resourced districts and schools might not experience such flexibility and autonomy due to a lack of resources—both human and fiscal—and a lack of capacity. Thus, we find that vulnerable schools might continue to struggle to improve in the era of ESSA.

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Medium 9781475836752

Putting the Public Back in Public Education

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Carrie Sampson

Sonya Douglass Horsford

Putting the Public Back in Public Education

Community Advocacy and Education Leadership under the Every Student Succeeds Act

A bstract: In this article, we argue that ESSA provides a unique policy window for district-level leaders to advance an equity agenda by working closely with local community advocates. Drawing from a larger qualitative, multiple case study on the role of school boards in three U.S. Mountain West school districts, we focus on community advocacy committed to expanding educational equity and opportunity for underserved Black, Latinx, and English learner students. Guided by community equity literacy as an organizing framework grounded in the literature on school–community relations, partnerships, and collaboration, we find that community advocates, who in some cases became school board members, identified educational inequities through various forms of knowledge, and then took deliberate actions to dismantle inequities in their respective school districts. We conclude with recommendations for how district-level leaders might leverage community advocacy and education leadership at the local level under ESSA.

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Medium 9781475836752

Sense-making of Federal Education Policy

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

F. Chris Curran

Ann T. Kellogg

Sense-making of Federal Education Policy

Social Network Analysis of Social Media Discourse around the Every Student Succeeds Act

ABSTRACT: Grounded in the sense-making literature, this study explores the discourse around and sentiment toward the newly passed Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) as discussed on the social media platform Twitter. The study explores the characteristics of and connections between users, the content of posts, and the sentiment toward ESSA. Data consisted of 12,544 tweets posted by 8,063 users analyzed through discourse analysis and social network analysis. Findings suggest that the discourse appears generally nonnegative with a clear pattern of clustering around sentiment. This suggests that users are in discourse with other users who share their view of the law. Discussion of policy issues such as local implementation and equity were common as were discussions of teacher preparation and comparisons to NCLB. Implications for the ongoing implementation of ESSA are discussed.

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Medium 9781475836752

Instruction to AU

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS

Submitting Papers to the Journal:

1. Manuscripts submitted for publication consideration should be sent electronically, via e-mail attachment, to Dr. Gaetane Jean-Marie, Editor, Journal of School Leadership , at jsl@louisville.edu . Two (2) copies of the manuscript should be attached: a master copy, including a title page (see instructions below) and all citations and references, and a masked copy of the manuscript, with the title page and all other author identifying information removed (including citations and references pertaining to any of the contributing authors’ works). Attachments should be in Microsoft Word format. Authors will receive e-mail acknowledgment of receipt of their manuscript within two weeks of submission. If confirmation is not received within this period, contact the editor.

2. All manuscripts should be typed, double-spaced, and follow the style outlined in the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association .

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