3071 Articles
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781442265790

Survivor(s)! Historical Peregrinations of New Orleans’s French Superior Council and Spanish Judicial Records

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Howard Margot

Curator, The Historic New Orleans Collection, Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street, New Orleans, LA 70130; howardm@hnoc.org

Abstract The city of New Orleans is home to extensive notarial and judicial manuscript records that document, often in minute detail, economic and legal activity in the Lower Mississippi Valley during the French (1699–1768) and Spanish (1769–1803) colonial periods. The legal custodianship of New Orleans’s largest colonial period archive has changed hands quite often over the last three centuries. This article recounts the peregrinations of these documents and their insertion into the collections of the Notarial Archives Division of the Orleans Parish Clerk of Civil Court’s office (NONA) and Old U.S. Mint of the Louisiana State Museum (LSM).

In addition to the considerable parochial archives of its Catholic Archdiocese (baptisms, marriages, deaths) and a modest but very important archive held in its main Public Library (the records of the Spanish Cabildo), the city of New Orleans is home to extensive notarial and judicial1 manuscript records that document, often in minute detail, economic and legal activity in the Lower Mississippi Valley during the French (1699–17682) and Spanish (1769–1803) colonial periods. Taken together, these three sets of records bear the names and witness to the lives of virtually every colonist who was propertied, and of many or most who were not, and of virtually every enslaved person who was ever publicly bought or sold or freed in New Orleans and environs during that span of time. But whereas the ecclesiastical and Cabildo (city hall) records have been continuously curated by the respective institutions that generated them in the eighteenth century, the legal custodianship of New Orleans’s largest colonial period archive—its notarial acts and judicial records—has changed hands quite often over the last three centuries, the most recent occurrence having been in 2007. Most often, the changes in custodianship have entailed changes in physical location, with the records’ having been transported a distance of anything from a few city blocks to a hundred miles. These peregrinations have for over two centuries compromised both the coherence of this priceless archive and the public’s ability to access it, and on too many occasions they have threatened its very existence.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781442265790

Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, and Museums

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Edward M Corrado and Heather Lea Moulaison

Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014. 294 pp. ISBN: 978-0-8108-8712-1

Reviewed by Kristin Condotta, Adjunct Instructor in History, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; condotta@wustl.edu

Digital preservation is a leadership issue. This is the key and convincing argument of Edward M. Corrado and Heather Lea Moulaison’s Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, & Museums. Their book—which explores “preserving curating and preserving digital content for long-term access” in the arts and sciences—offers a reflective look at the digitization process from two scholars well experienced with web technologies (xix). Its stance is more “I wish I thought of/planned for that before starting” than “how-to,” and purposefully so. This big-picture approach allows their suggestions to be applicable across systems and institutions.

Corrado and Moulaison particularly promote a proactive approach to artifact and research digitization. They emphasize that such projects are long-term and need to be defined as clear yet flexible organizational, technological and financial commitments early in their inception. More centrally, the authors expand on the concerns of subject forerunner Michael Lesk as expressed in the book’s forward, that too much attention has gone to the IT aspects of digital preservation. They instead argue for a “triad of interrelated [and interdependent] activities,” or those relating to management, technology and content (17). They identify management, or the ability of project leaders to make transparent decisions about their digital collection’s access, composition and authenticity during its life-cycle, as the most valuable of these three commitments. As a result, Digital Preservation is geared towards a specific audience of librarians, archivists and curators—as opposed to collections specialists, cataloguers and systems technicians—who typically are charged with shaping the long-term trajectory of digital projects. It points out the ways that digital media share many issues with physical collections (i.e., fitting organizational missions, copyright and preservation), yet have their own challenges (i.e., rapidly changing formats). Above all, it provides the insight needed for these professionals and their institutes to craft forward-looking Memorandum of Understanding for their own digital preservation projects.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475827149

A Proposed Integrated STEM Framework for Contemporary Teacher Preparation

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

A Proposed Integrated STEM Framework for Contemporary Teacher Preparation

Andrea Burrows and Timothy Slater

ABSTRACT: This theoretical position paper proposes a novel and actionable framework for analyzing and enhancing future teachers’ level of complexity in integrating knowledge, skills, and attitudes across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Using a lens of pedagogical content knowledge, conventional STEM teacher preparation efforts focus on learning how to best teach isolated scientific disciplines separately. In contrast, recent calls for education reform emphasize the need for the next generation of teachers to be cross-trained across disciplines and having the ability to integrate the STEM disciplines as iSTEM. This is a challenge because most teachers have only received training in one or two disciplines and no formal training on integrating the STEM disciplines cohesively. In response, we propose a hierarchical conceptual framework to guide and assess the preparation of teachers to teach through a more contemporary lens of STEM as a fully integrated domain to advance STEM across educational systems.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475827149

Research Experiences for Teachers as a Capstone for Content Knowledge

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Research Experiences for Teachers as a Capstone for Content Knowledge

Carole G. Basile, Doris Kimbrough, and Laura Sample McMeeking

ABSTRACT: Research experiences for teachers have been shown to change teacher beliefs and transfer learning about the nature of science, experimental design, process skills, and the ability to communicate complex science research to the classroom. In addition, collaboration with scientists has been shown to improve teachers’ science teaching and learning. This article examines the outcomes of 22 teachers who participated in summer research experiences in both science and mathematics. In this study, teachers’ content knowledge; beliefs about the nature and discovery of math and science; tools, processes, and technology use; pedagogical content knowledge; and pedagogical knowledge changed as a result of their participation. Transfer of the experiences to the classroom varied, and many barriers to transfer were identified.

cOver the years, experts have written about the “best practices” of professional development (PD) for teachers. Guskey (2000) defines PD as “those processes and activities designed to enhance the professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes of educators so that they might, in turn, improve the learning of students” (p. 16). The teacher professional development literature provides several lists of good research-based characteristics, many that overlap (Garet, Porter, Desimone, Birman, & Yoon, 2001; Guskey, 2000, 2003; Hawley & Valli, 2001; Loucks-Horsley & Matsumoto, 1999). From this larger list, the National Research Council (2000) created a simplified list of four principles of learning to consider in the design of PD: (1) learner centered, (2) knowledge centered, (3) assessment centered, and (4) community based.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475827149

Building a Learning Environment, Supporting a Learning Community

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Building a Learning Environment, Supporting a Learning Community

Facilitating STEM Teachers’ Planned and Integrative Skill and Strategy Transfer

Patricia L. Hardré, Janis Slater, Mark Nanny, Hazem Refai, Randa Shehab, and Chen Ling

abstract: Teacher professional development in the United States is prioritized to respond to the country’s eroding role in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). University partnership programs in the interdisciplinary, applied field of engineering strive to blend disciplinary skills in authentic contexts, to mend the STEM pipeline. The present study followed 16 math and science teachers through a yearlong professional development immersion-to-transfer experience. Multimethod, multisource data included 181 data points for each participant, gathered in more than 30 different (synchronous and asynchronous) contact events. Findings provide insight into characteristics of teachers and mentors, along with designed and emergent characteristics of the activity and environments that influenced teachers’ success in learning and transfer. They also underscore innovative change efforts that teachers took back to their schools and how those efforts were received.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475824469

IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES: CLASSWIDE SELF-MANAGEMENT OF RULE FOLLOWING

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Classwide Self-Management of Rule Following

Christina M. Terenzi
Ruth A. Ervin
Kathryn E. Hoff

The study accompanying these implementation guidelines included students in a special education resource room during a language arts instructional block. The target students were three sixth-grade boys who were diagnosed with learning disabilities and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. According to an anecdotal report from the special education teacher as well as additional data sources, the three target students were the most disruptive and off-task students in the class, for which the behavioral management strategies in place did not seem to be effective. The schoolwide positive behavior support program included three rules: Be safe, Be respectful, and Be responsible. As part of the schoolwide initiative, students could earn gold slips in all settings, which consisted of positive written feedback for appropriate rule-following behaviors that could be used as entries in a weekly drawing to win prizes.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475824469

FOURTH ANNUAL WING SUMMIT ON EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN EDUCATION: FEATURE ARTICLES

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Frank M. Gresham

ABSTRACT: Continuous progress-monitoring tools and data-based decisions are not as well established for social behavior as they are for academic behavior using curriculum-based measurement strategies. Progress monitoring for social behavior is important because educators need to know whether a student’s rate of progress in a social–behavioral intervention is adequate to reach an acceptable criterion of proficiency within a specific period. Progress monitoring is required to establish students’ rates of improvement, to identify students who are not responding to intervention, and to make valid decisions about continuing, altering, or terminating intervention. Several progress-monitoring tools have been recommended, including systematic direct observations, direct behavior reports, and behavior-rating scales. Each tool has its advantages and disadvantages. This article examines why none of these tools are sufficient, in and of themselves, for continuous progress monitoring. An alternative—namely, brief behavior-rating scales—is described as being potentially viable. The article concludes with a discussion of various ways of evaluating educationally significant change in interventions.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475824254

The Impact of Poverty, School Enrollment, and Ninth-Grade Transition Programs on Promotion

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Impact of Poverty, School Enrollment, and Ninth-Grade Transition Programs on Promotion

Edward Cox

Mark Hopkins

David G. Buckman

ABSTRACT: This study investigated the impact of poverty, enrollment, and the presence of a 9th-grade transition program on students’ promotion to 10th grade. Promotion to 10th grade is the essential first step toward graduation and is an immediate measure among strategies used to support 9th-grade students. Thirty South Carolina high schools were selected on the basis of their poverty indices. Schools were analyzed in terms of their poverty levels, enrollments, and 10th-grade promotion rate. None of the independent variables were shown to be statistically significant in terms of their impact on promotion to 10th grade, but when poverty was excluded, the results were found to be significant.

An important piece of educational legislation was passed in 2002 by President George Bush: the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, also known as No Child Left Behind. This legislation required a level of accountability. For example, new federal guidelines were adopted to ensure that at-risk populations were progressing. Adequate yearly progress was introduced to track subgroups of students based on race, ethnicity, poverty, and special needs. No Child Left Behind also required each state to set graduation rate targets, with 100% by the year 2014 (Patterson, Beltyukova, Berman, & Francis, 2007). Each state subsequently designed and implemented a system of accountability, through which schools and educators are measured against the achievement of their students. These achievement data are used to rate schools through annual school report cards. The annual school report card information—select items such as graduation rates—have become common conversation topics for parents as well as other community stakeholders. Public schools, while slowly improving, still fall short in the primary measures of success and the goals set forth by No Child Left Behind. A primary goal set by the legislation was a 100% graduation rate by 2014. With only 74.1% of high school students graduating with a diploma within 4 years (National Center for Education Statistics, 2010), additional research has been conducted to further address the reasons why students are not graduating from high school.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475823813

A Step Beyond No Child Left Behind: Is Florida the Future?

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

GEORGE E. PAWLAS

ABSTRACT: Schools face major challenges today that have been created by reform initiatives and expectations from Florida and federal legislation. This article focuses on the impact of accountability mandates on student achievement through the responses of central Florida school administrators at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. They were asked: How has increased accountability impacted your daily work? How has student achievement changed over the past 3 years in your schools? What has been done to improve student achievement? The findings have implications for principals and school public relations.

Educational reform initiatives since 2001 have focused on accountability for student performance. This was a dramatic shift in the focus of federal, state, and local policy away from the distribution of money and toward improved student test scores. No Child Left Behind (NCLB) requires that all states have in place accountability systems that provide for annual testing of all students in grades 3 through 8, the disaggregation of student test scores by groups sorted for demographics, continuous oversight, sanctions for poorly performing schools, and the option for parents of children in chronically low-performing schools to move their children to other schools (Elmore, 2004). Florida’s accountability system precedes NCLB and surpasses it in rigor.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781442271340

Curating Biocultural Collections: A Handbook

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub
by Jan Salick, Katie Konchar, and Mark Nesbitt, editors. Kew: Royal Botanic Gardens. 2014. 250 pp. ISBN 978-1-84246-498-4 Reviewed by Rose Kubiatowicz, Museum Consultant & Owner of Have Gloves Will Travel, LLC; rosekubi@earthlink.net In the past I worked with seed collections, ethnographic collections and ethnobio-logical products at the Science Museum of Minnesota where I developed Oh No! Ethnobotany, a program for the safe handling and storage of potentially hazardous ethnobotanical materials. Today, I work with a number of small history museums and private collections that contain ethnographic, ethnobiological products and ethnozoological collections. Thus, with great interest, I read Curating Biocultural Collections: A Handbook. Based upon my experiences, I have concluded that this book would be a valuable addition to any professional’s shelf of resource books. This volume illuminates a world of work, tradition, insight and foresight. It is a “go-to” book for both young professionals, who can turn to Curating Biocultural Collections: A Handbook for lucid, practical advice on the essentials of effective biocultural curation, and for experienced colleagues who will find it a rich compendium to enhance and refresh their knowledge, and rethink their assumptions. See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Watt

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The African American Male AVID Initiative

A Study of Implementation and Impact on Student Aspirations and School Performance

Karen M. Watt

Jeffery Huerta

Jennifer Butcher

ABSTRACT: This is a study of five high schools awarded external funding to implement a project, the African American Male Initiative (AAMI). During the first year of implementation, interviews, focus groups, surveys, and student academic transcripts provided sources of data. Survey data showed that AAMI students exhibited high aspirations and anticipations for college. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the number of people students communicate with about college and financial aid requirement information and their level of college knowledge. Characteristics such as African American male mentoring and advocacy, raised expectations, and forming a “brotherhood” emerged from focus group data.

Purpose of the Study

This study examined the implementation process of the African American Male Initiative (AAMI) in five selected schools across the nation. The purpose was to identify any unique and common characteristics of AAMI implementation in each of the selected schools, as well as to explain the initiative’s impact on AAMI students’ aspirations and academic performance. The following research questions are addressed in this study:

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Thessin

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Key Features to Inform Student Outcomes

Learning from a High School Healthcare Education Program

Rebecca A. Thessin

Ellen Scully-Russ

Jeanine Hildreth

Daina S. Lieberman

ABSTRACT: At a time when U.S. policymakers are demonstrating their commitment to CTE established to address particular workforce shortage areas, this mixed methods evaluation study sought to understand the key features and outcomes of an existing healthcare education program (HEP) founded with this intent. Findings demonstrated that the HEP incorporates several unique features that should be considered by other programs including hands-on work using hospital equipment, workplace observations, and a strong emphasis on career decision-making efficacy. Evidence showed that students who continue in a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program for more than one year may exhibit somewhat higher rates of college enrollment.

KEY WORDS: career and technical education, CTE innovation, healthcare, workforce

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475836769

Instruction to AU

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub
Medium 9781475836752

Supportive Principals and Black Teacher Turnover

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Ayana Kee Campoli

Supportive Principals and Black Teacher Turnover

ESSA as an Opportunity to Improve Retention

Abstract : In U.S. public schools, the shortage of teachers of African descent specifically, and teachers of color more generally, is a worsening problem that has severe, detrimental effects on students. This shortage of Black teachers is driven in part by high turnover, much of which is precipitated by the poor working conditions in their schools. In this study, I analyze data from a sample of approximately 1,600 Black teachers who participated in the Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS, 2007–2008). My findings about the role of supportive principals have implications for how state departments of education should use Every Student Succeeds Act funds.

Key Words: Teacher Turnover, Principals, Black Teachers, Education Policy, Structural Equation Modeling

The shortage of teachers of color is particularly acute, especially given the rising racial diversity of the student population in U.S. public schools. Half of the nation’s public–school students are White (50%), a quarter are Latina/o (25%), approximately 16% are Black, and another 9% are either Asian American, American Indian, or bi-/multiracial. However, the demographics of the teaching force do not reflect this same diversity, as the vast majority—82%—of public school teachers are White (Snyder, de Brey, & Dillow, 2016).

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475842425

Mediavilla

Russo, Charles J. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Is There Real Freedom of School Choice?

An Analysis from a Study in Chile1

Mauro Mediavilla

Adrián Zancajo

Abstract: Between 1981 and 1990, Chile began to implement an education reform based on school choice and a financing system through vouchers. In theory, the system ensures complete freedom of choice of school by families. This article attempts to identify the existence of factors that conditioned the enrollment process in different types of schools existing nowadays in the Chilean educational system, the largest quasi-market of Latin America. Results show a social stratification and separation by schools and indicate how geographical distance and social composition are the most critical factors for families when choosing a school.

KeyWords: (JEL Codes: I21, I28), school choice, social class, quasi-markets, voucher, chile

Introduction

Between 1981 and 1990, during the military dictatorship, Chile implemented an ambitious education reform based on school choice and a financing system through vouchers (Delannoy, 2000). This reform of the educational system and subsequent reforms were aimed at improving the quality of education through the interaction between free choice for families and competition between schools for students. Parallel to this process, there was a significant increase in the presence of the private sector in education, especially subsidized private schools (Joiko, 2012).

See All Chapters

Load more