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Medium 9781538119952

Reconstructing the Lansdowne Collection of Classical Marbles, Volume II: Catalogue

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Archives and Special Collections at the University of La Verne

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Archives and Special Collections at the University of La Verne

Putting the Repository of a Small Liberal Arts College to Work Online

Benjamin Jenkins

Archivist, Wilson Library, and Assistant Professor and Director of Public History Program, Department of History and Political Science, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA; bjenkins@laverne.edu

Keren Darancette

Research and Instruction Librarian, Wilson Library, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA; kdarancette@laverne.edu

Abstract Archives and Special Collections at the Wilson Library of the University of La Verne, located in inland southern California, offers an informative case study of descriptive practices and metadata attached to digital collections at a small liberal arts college. Since recruiting a staff specifically tasked to manage the archives, the Wilson Library has increased the number of collections available to patrons online through the creation of a digital collections Web page. Digitized, hosted collections include the papers of a faculty member from the early 20th century, photographs of early La Verne, historic local newspapers, and manuscript sources regarding Japanese American internment. Metadata fields at Wilson Library have developed to encompass a greater variety of contextual information about digitized records, improving users’ ability to put the collections to use for research. Ultimately, this case study demonstrates what a library at a small university can accomplish with a dedicated staff and a clear objective, even with limited resources.

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African Art at The Kreeger Museum

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

African Art at The Kreeger Museum

Validating a Collection and Its Historic Stakeholders

Antonia Dapena-Tretter

School and Outreach Manager, The Walt Disney Family Museum, San Francisco, CA; antonia@maybeorange.com

Eloise Pelton

Archivist, The Kreeger Museum, Washington, D.C.; research@kreegermuseum.org

Abstract Written by The Kreeger Museum’s former head of education and its founding archivist, this article looks closely at provenance and makes use of primary source documents and photographs to relive the rich story of how The Kreeger Museum’s African art collection came to be. A detailed account of the negotiations, communications, transactions, and circulations of people, objects, and ideas—the following narrative offers an interesting case study into the early European and American art collectors’ circuit.

Consisting of 28 art objects from at least 17 different West African cultures, The Kreeger Museum’s African collection is small but remarkably comprehensive and mostly the result of David Lloyd Kreeger’s choice to use Warren Robbins (1923–2008)—founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art—as his primary adviser. Purchased within the relatively short time frame of seven years, this important subcollection of the larger Kreeger Museum holdings reflects more than the financial success that made it possible, roughly defined by David Kreeger’s most profitable years at the Government Employees Insurance Company (better known by its acronym, GEICO).1 It also reveals a noteworthy appreciation of non-Western art, fostered during the collector’s years at Rutgers University (1925–1929), where he majored in political science and economics. As Kreeger built his collection, questions of authenticity were answered by tracing provenance back to notable European collectors or, in some rare instances, African soil and the precise moment of the object’s appropriation into Western hands. To shine a light on the history of the museum’s African holdings is to simultaneously illuminate a network of seemingly disparate connections—Dr. Albert Barnes (1872–1951), Paul Guillaume (1891–1934), and Helena Rubinstein (1872–1965)—and the colonial past that tied them and the larger Western tradition of collecting African art together.

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Voila!

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Voila!

The Rockefeller Archive Center’s Exhibit Creation Process

Marissa Vassari

Archivist and Educator, Rockefeller Archive Center, 15 Dayton Avenue, Sleepy Hollow, NY; mvassari@rockarch.org

Abstract The Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC) in Sleepy Hollow, New York, hosts groups ranging from foundation staff to college-level classes. Over the course of a year, the RAC hosts approximately 30 visiting groups that include from as few as 10 people to as many as 45. The aim is to engage visiting groups with the RAC’s vast collections by creating hands-on, tailored exhibits. The RAC has created policies and procedures, exhibit guides, and workflow templates that allow for documentation of each exhibit and encourage inclusiveness and transparency among staff. Employing a new, standardized approach by using these tools has made all phases of the exhibit process more efficient and allows the RAC to provide a rich, immersive archival experience for visitors. This article offers a case study in standardized exhibit creation that may benefit professionals in other institutions who are seeking to develop work processes and policies without diminishing the visitor experience.

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The Money Museum of the Deutsche Bundesbank

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Medium 9781538119952

The Anatomy of a Museum

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Medium 9781538119952

Challenging the “Love of Possessions”

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Challenging the “Love of Possessions”

Repatriation of Sacred Objects in the United States and Canada

Jennifer L. Dekker

MA Candidate, St. Paul University, 65 University Private, Room 105, Ottawa, ON, Canada; jdekker@uottawa.ca

Abstract In 1990, the United States passed the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), requiring the repatriation of ancestral remains, funerary, and sacred objects from museums to source communities. Since then, hundreds of thousands of repatriations have occurred, allowing for respectful treatment of ancestors and reconnections to spiritual, communal practice, and ceremony. In Canada, repatriation has been recommended by the Assembly of First Nations, the Canadian Museum Association, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but there is no federal law. Does Canada have a functioning alternative? This examination provides a comparison of how repatriation differs in the two countries, demonstrating that case-by-case negotiations in Canada currently allow for more flexibility and customization to the needs of different Indigenous communities but that the transparency, coordination, and funding associated with NAGPRA would be a significant benefit to claimants in Canada.

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Reconstructing the Lansdowne Collection of Classical Marbles, Volume I: History

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Medium 9781538119952

The Care of Prints and Drawings

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Anatomy of a Museum

By Steven Miller. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018. 277 pages. ISBN: 978-1-11923-703-7.

Reviewed by Phoebe Cos, Associate Educator, Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center, P.O. Box 37012, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.; cosp@si.edu

Steven Miller’s The Anatomy of a Museum presents an honest, humorous, and detailed introduction to the museum field, one that would be a valuable addition to the reading list of any introductory museum class or emerging museum professional. The book is a compendium of Miller’s course “The Anatomy of a Museum,” which he teaches at Seton Hall University as part of the master’s degree in museum professions. Miller breaks down the multifaceted world of the museum into 19 easily digestible chapters ranging from topics commonly featured in introductory museum texts, such as “Museum Governance” and “Curating=Connoisseurship=Collecting,” to more nuanced chapters, such as “Museums and the Media” and “Architecture.” Each of these begins with an amusing quote that draw readers into the topic and contains photographs from museums around the United States to illustrate Miller’s observations. A set of class questions follows each chapter, varying between case study–specific questions and more generalized questions related to the topic. Miller poses to his readers questions and scenarios encountered and debated by museum professionals regularly in the museum field, many of which lack one correct answer. A sample of Miller’s final exam prompt is included in the appendix, creating a full class curriculum for a potential museum studies class that could be taught at another academic institution.

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Medium 9781538114018

Scripture on the Edge of God

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Scripture on the Edge of God

Ephraim Radner

Nothing could be more gratifying and humbling to me than the discussion of Time and the Word offered by this symposium of deeply perceptive and faithful theologians. I am enormously grateful. The breadth of discussion makes my own response challenging. At the outset I will simply offer my genuine thanks for whatever praise has been offered. But for what follows, I will turn to the questions and sometimes clear critiques my colleagues have helpfully laid out. There is a common thread among these, that is, a concern about over-loading the divine nature of Scripture, such that, on the one hand Scripture may seem to take the place of God or on the other, that it may seem to swallow up the distinct singularities of historical existence—creation, events, individuals, persons. I will try to address this under several general headings.

An Experiment

I want to admit up front that many of the specifics related to the general concern just mentioned derive from my own lack of clear understanding about the matters Time and Word addressed! This is due to my own intellectual limitations, no doubt, but also to the fact that the book as a whole was an experiment, one in which I was trying to work something out, without yet knowing where it would end up, or quite seizing the implications of what I was doing. I will explain the particular experiment below, but first I want to make an apology, both in the sense of defense as well as asking for pardon.

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Remembering My Teacher Robert W. Jenson

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Remembering My Teacher Robert W. Jenson

Rev. Gregory P. Fryer

I met Robert and Blanche Jenson during my first week at seminary, back in 1980 at the Gettysburg Lutheran Theological Seminary. The Seminary hosted a supper in the refectory for faculty and new students, and I found myself seated at a table with the Jensons. I mentioned to Jenson that I had read his recent book back then, Visible Words.1 Jenson asked me whether I understood it. I answered that no, I had not. Jenson broke into a big smile and seemed to have affection for me ever since.

Theologians and clergy across the land might study and be grateful for Jenson’s theology. But unless you have worshiped with him, you might not understand the essential link for him between theology and the liturgy.

I have heard two descriptions of how bishops were selected in the early church. Both descriptions sound great to me. According to one description, the bishop was simply the best preacher and theologian around. According to the other, the bishop was the one who composed the most fitting and powerful Eucharistic prayers. On either of these descriptions, Robert W. Jenson would have been a great bishop. In fact, in my mind, he would have been a great Pope!

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Keeping Time

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Keeping Time

Human Finitude and Figural Interpretation

Daniel J. Treier

The question of how figural reading relates to human finitude arises from the nearly contemporaneous appearance of two dazzling books from Ephraim Radner—Time and the Word: Figural Reading of the Christian Scriptures and A Time to Keep: Theology, Mortality, and the Shape of a Human Life.1 The intuition explored here is that these books do not entirely cohere in their approaches to time, their common theme. Perhaps, even if this intuition is misguided, exploring it will draw further attention to neglected territory.

Radner uniquely combines existential passion, pastoral experience, and deep learning. These books cover a breathtaking amount of biblical, historical, conceptual, and cultural territory. While Radner is not afraid to speak directly about the churchly problems, he also listens carefully. So I am grateful for the chance to explore these distinctively Anglican pathways, even if I must doggedly make my way back to a Presbyterian home.

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On Radner’s Time and the Word

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

On Radner’s Time and the Word

Paul J. Griffiths

I’m grateful to have been asked to contribute to this symposium on Ephraim Radner’s book, Time and the Word: Figural Reading of the Christian Scriptures. It’s a real book, by which I mean that it’s the written deposit of concentrated thought about a set of questions as if it were important to approach and answer them rightly. It’s something more than journeyman academic work, and something more, too, than the work of someone who cares for the church and wishes to serve her. It has the unusual virtue of combining wide learning, intellectual passion, and devotion to Christ and his church. In reading it, it seemed to me that I was faced with a mind at work on something that matters. That is rare, and good; I’m grateful to Radner for it.

So, what is the book about? It offers an elucidation and defense of figural reading, exegesis, and preaching of Christian Scripture, together with examples of these activities being performed, and some instruction in how to perform them better. Radner acknowledges that the last forty years or so has seen a massive recovery of interest in figural reading and interpretation of Scripture in the anglophone Christian world; but he also writes that this kind of reading is still under-theorized or badly theorized, and therefore in need of further elucidation and defense. What does he mean by “figural reading”? Here are two instances, among many, of brief attempts on his part to say: “Scripture in particular is . . . the gift of an omnipotent God who has so construed the world and ordered the words of the Bible, that the latter may function broadly in an inter-signifying role to navigate through the former in the direction of salvation’s grasp” (157–58). And: “[F]igural reading is the temporal explication, through the juxtaposition of her multiple texts, of Scripture’s divine ‘allness’” (210). The idea is that the text of Scripture is intended by God to be a text capable of signifying, and being read to signify, everything: all that there is, and everything that has happened and will happen. So reading it is figural reading, and it is reading that assumes a deep and serious claim about the text, the Lord, and what is neither the text nor the Lord.

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You Shall Love the Lord with All Your Mind

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

You Shall Love the Lord with All Your Mind

Blanche Jenson

1953

We sat in Solomon, his 1939 Packard, engaged in serious debate. Should the Lutherans join the World Council of Churches? I chose the affirmative. He firmly argued the negative. He became an ecumenical theologian.

We sat eating lunch in Dinky Town talking theology. He said, “You know only the froth on the beer.” How right he was.

1954

We sat on the bank of the Mississippi River eating pizza. A decision was made. We would spend the rest of our lives doing theology together. And so we have.

2017

It is Advent. I sit at my grandparents’ table opposite an empty chair. Our conversation has been interrupted. But I am blessed with his words: books, essays, lectures, sermons, verses, and all the memories attached to them.

Above the mantel in his study hangs an embroidered command (a gift from a student): YOU SHALL THE LOVE THE LORD YOUR GOD WITH ALL YOUR MIND. Although Jens chose to follow his father into the ministry, he knew his gift was not his father’s: the common touch. His gift was thinking and, he soon learned, also teaching. The seminary assigned him not to a parish but to campus ministry at the University of Minnesota for internship. That is where our life together began.

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The Christomorphic Shaping of Time in Radner’s Time and the Word

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Christomorphic Shaping of Time in Radner’s Time and the Word

Don Collett

Like many of his other books, Radner’s Time and the Word offers the reader a wide-ranging theological and historical analysis of a set of related issues. For this reason alone, a comprehensive interaction with the book’s content presents a daunting task for any reviewer. Taking a cue from the early church, it may be more helpful to focus on the basic hypothesis of the work. When the fathers spoke of Scripture’s hypothesis, they had in view the question of Scripture’s unifying reality, the question of that which ties together the entire fabric of Scripture. To ask about Scripture’s hypothesis, then, is to ask what Scripture is all about. To ask about the hypothesis of Time and the Word, then, is to ask what it is all about.

The book’s interaction with different ways of understanding what we mean by “time,” especially the view of time at work in what Radner styles “historicist metaphysics,” might lead one to conclude that its hypothesis consists in making the case for a biblical view of time. As an abbreviated judgment regarding the book’s hypothesis, that conclusion would not be wholly mistaken. It is just here, however, that the book’s subtitle—Figural Reading of the Christian Scriptures—helps refine that judgment. In brief, what the book is all about is the case for a figural reading of the two-testament Christian Bible. But as it turns out, the case for such a reading rests upon our understanding of time, and that in turn rests upon our understanding of creation and its relation to God. The way in which this case is made, as well as some of the questions it raises, will be addressed at a later point. For the time being, a more descriptive approach to the book’s understanding of time is called for, which I have tried to capture in the title of this essay: “The Christomorphic Shaping of Time in Radner’s Time and the Word.” Such a title implies the basic issue at stake in Christian figural reading, namely, given time’s prior origin in creation, how can we conceive of time as something shaped by the historical form (morphē) of Christ’s life? Put differently, if time is given with creation, and creation precedes Christ’s incarnation in time, then how can one properly speak of the Christomorphic shaping of time? The very idea smacks of anachronism, that “sin of sins” it is the calling of every good and responsible historian to avoid.

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