3054 Articles
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781538114001

Scriptural Completion in the Infancy Gospel of James

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Scriptural Completion in the Infancy Gospel of James

Markus Bockmuehl

Every authoritative text—perhaps any significant text—involves its hearers and readers in a process of engagement that invites or even requires the filling of gaps or breaks in what is written.1

In communities committed to canons of Holy Scripture, this engagement may at times appear to outsiders as little more than rationalization—the exposition of a static document in the service of a concern for authorized meaning. Closer observation, however, tends instead to uncover a complex, historically self-renewing process of relating text to intertext; of nuancing the tensions and suspensions of law and poetry and prophecy differentially; of continually rereading multiple senses of the text in light of each other; of the interplay of memory, retrieval, and aggiornamento within an interpreter’s living community of praxis, study, and worship.

At the same time, this process sometimes gives rise to a further stage of engagement with authoritative texts, more liminal and yet in other respects more generative than the picture just described. The very genesis of the scriptural texts themselves bears witness to a dynamic process of reception, appreciation, and transmission. In so doing, the sacred page gives rise to new, epiphenomenal text that may either become an integral part of the emerging scriptural voice or alternatively attain an independent authority of its own as a metatext that nevertheless remains associated in some sense with the generative personality of a Moses or an Ezra, a Paul or a John. This process has long been of interest to students of inter-textual and inner-biblical interpretation, of reception history and effective history, in both the Jewish and Christian scriptures.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781538114001

Transfiguring Doubt: A Retrieval from Augustine’s Meta-Apologetic in De Trinitate

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Transfiguring Doubt: A Retrieval from Augustine’s Meta-Apologetic in De Trinitate

Clifton Stringer

Part I. Apologetic Contexts

1.1. Necessary Uncertainty?

In 2011, the late journalist Christopher Hitchens (1949–2011) debated John Haldane at Oxford on questions related to God, faith, and public policy. Hitchens began his opening statement by describing a curious fact about the death of American President Abraham Lincoln, as Lincoln expired in a room in Petersen House not far from Pennsylvania Avenue. Hitchens:

We still don’t know, when his cabinet gathered around him and saw him die . . . either [his cabinet member Stanton or Herndon] said, “Now he’s with the angels” or “Now he’s with the ages.” We still don’t know [which was said]. And there’s no reason why we shouldn’t. There were eyewitnesses, literate men, practically contemporaries of ours. They were in the age of print, in the age of photography, and yet nobody knows which thing Stanton or Herndon said.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781538114001

A Spirituality of the Word: The Medieval Roots of Traditional Anglican Worship

/products/publishers/1820/list ePub

A Spirituality of the Word: The Medieval Roots of Traditional Anglican Worship

Jesse D. Billett

Jesse D. Billett, Trinity College, University of Toronto, 6 Hoskin Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1H8. Email: jesse.billett@utoronto.ca

The title of this paper1 is perhaps not one that would have been chosen by the priest and scholar in whose memory it is offered. Fr. Robert Darwin Crouse (1930–2011), Professor of Classics at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and several times Visiting Professor of Patrology at the Institutum Patristicum Augustinianum of the Pontifical Lateran University in Rome, was indeed deeply learned in the history and theology of the Middle Ages, that is, the millennium following the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West (conventionally dated ca. 500–1500). But I imagine that he would be disappointed that I was not going to show how Anglican liturgical spirituality could be traced right back to the Fathers of the early Christian centuries. No doubt that could be done. But the Middle Ages made their own distinctive contribution to Anglican worship that invites our attention. This paper addresses just one aspect of Anglican worship, the Divine Office, the daily services of Mattins and Evensong. The Divine Office has arguably been more important for Anglicans than it has been for any other Christian denomination. Until very recently, the offices of Mattins and Evensong, not the Eucharist, were for Anglicans the principal act of Sunday worship. And from the time of the Reformation the daily offices were proposed not just as a clerical or monastic discipline (as, for example, in the Roman communion), but as the joint prayer of the whole worshipping community, lay and ordained.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781538114001

The Sacramentality of the Church in Dumitru Stăniloae’s Theology

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The Sacramentality of the Church in Dumitru Stăniloae’s Theology

Viorel Coman

The question of the Church’s sacramental nature has received significant attention in the bilateral and multilateral ecumenical dialogues over the last six decades. As Emmanuel Clapsis noted, the question itself was raised “because for some Christian churches and ecumenists (primarily Orthodox and Roman Catholic theologians) the Church is the sacrament of God’s presence in the world, while others (especially Protestant theologians) believe that while Christ is the sacrament of God’s grace in the world, the Church must not be called a sacrament. The Church is only a privileged instrument of God’s grace that leads to the unity in the Church of the whole world with Christ.”1 As was expected, the 1982 Munich document issued by the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church found therefore no difficulty in affirming the Church’s sacramental role: “The Church manifests what it is, the sacrament of the Trinitarian koinonia, the ‘dwelling of God with men’ (cf. Rev. 21:4).”2 When it comes to Protestant theologians, their reluctance to adopt the language of the sacramentality of the Church springs from their conviction that such an understanding of the ekklesia leads to triumphalism, obscures the distinction between Christ and the Church, and overlooks the sinfulness of those who make up the Church. In spite of that, a certain level of consensus on the theme of the Church’s sacramentality has been reached so far in the reports of the WCC Faith and Order Commission (Uppsala 1968; Accra 1974; Bangalore 1977; Chantilly 1985),3 as well as in the bilateral dialogues between the Roman Catholic Church and the Churches issued from the Reformation: “Towards a Common Understanding of the Church” § 94–113 (Reformed–Roman Catholic Dialogue, 1984–1990);4 “Church and Justification” § 118–134 (Lutheran–Roman Catholic Dialogue, 1993).5 The 2013 Faith and Order convergence text “The Church: Towards a Common Vision” § 25–27 constitutes another important example in this regard.6 However, the topic of the Church’s sacramental role needs further reflection, for it remains still an unresolved theological issue in the ecumenical discussions.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Watt

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

The African American Male AVID Initiative

A Study of Implementation and Impact on Student Aspirations and School Performance

Karen M. Watt

Jeffery Huerta

Jennifer Butcher

ABSTRACT: This is a study of five high schools awarded external funding to implement a project, the African American Male Initiative (AAMI). During the first year of implementation, interviews, focus groups, surveys, and student academic transcripts provided sources of data. Survey data showed that AAMI students exhibited high aspirations and anticipations for college. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the number of people students communicate with about college and financial aid requirement information and their level of college knowledge. Characteristics such as African American male mentoring and advocacy, raised expectations, and forming a “brotherhood” emerged from focus group data.

Purpose of the Study

This study examined the implementation process of the African American Male Initiative (AAMI) in five selected schools across the nation. The purpose was to identify any unique and common characteristics of AAMI implementation in each of the selected schools, as well as to explain the initiative’s impact on AAMI students’ aspirations and academic performance. The following research questions are addressed in this study:

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Thessin

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Key Features to Inform Student Outcomes

Learning from a High School Healthcare Education Program

Rebecca A. Thessin

Ellen Scully-Russ

Jeanine Hildreth

Daina S. Lieberman

ABSTRACT: At a time when U.S. policymakers are demonstrating their commitment to CTE established to address particular workforce shortage areas, this mixed methods evaluation study sought to understand the key features and outcomes of an existing healthcare education program (HEP) founded with this intent. Findings demonstrated that the HEP incorporates several unique features that should be considered by other programs including hands-on work using hospital equipment, workplace observations, and a strong emphasis on career decision-making efficacy. Evidence showed that students who continue in a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program for more than one year may exhibit somewhat higher rates of college enrollment.

KEY WORDS: career and technical education, CTE innovation, healthcare, workforce

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Maranto

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Desert Bloom?

Lessons from Two Decades of Arizona Charter Schooling

Robert Maranto

Alexandra Vasile

ABSTRACT: For decades, scholars and politicians have debated the likely impacts of school choice. Yet few have studied the nation’s largest state-level charter school market, Arizona, whose 20-year-old charter sector accounts for about 17% of Arizona public school enrollment. This article summarizes the extant literature on this market, some 23 studies, supplemented with original fieldwork to derive tentative lessons for social scientists and policymakers. While the charter sector seems to have promoted innovation, teacher and parent empowerment, and modest improvement in traditional public schools, findings regarding student learning and segregation are less clear.

KEY WORDS: charter schools, school choice, school innovation, parent satisfaction

Introduction

Supporters argue that the market provision of education will foster innovation, improve overall academic performance, empower parents who have been disempowered by school bureaucracies and hierarchical politics, offer a better fit between educational programs and individual student needs, push traditional public schools to improve, and increase classroom-level integration (Friedman, 1962; Greene, 2005; Chubb & Moe, 1990; Thernstrom & Thernstrom, 2003; works within Fox & Buchanan, 2014). Further, some argue that increased school choice may foster better citizenship by creating school-level communities rather than large, atomistic school settings (Campbell, 2001; Wolf, 2005, 2007; Greene & Kingsbury, 2017; Mohme, 2017). Supporters also argue that choice empowers teachers, who may start their own schools or education cooperatives (Dirkswager, 2002; Maranto & Maranto, 2006), perhaps reflecting progressive ideals (works within Rofes & Stulberg, 2004).

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Morse

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Homeschooling

A Growing School Choice Option for Meeting Special Educational Needs

Mary L. Morse

Sherry Mee Bell

ABSTRACT: The unexplained, rapid growth of homeschooling over the past two decades provides the context for this quantitative study. The relation between parental involvement in education, special educational needs, and the school choice option of homeschooling is examined via completion of an online survey. Of the 309 homeschooling families that responded to the survey, more than half (50.8%) had a child who attended public or private school before they made the decision to homeschool, and 60.6% of these families indicated they were currently homeschooling a child who had special educational needs (SEN). Results suggest that when parents perceive needs of a child with SEN are not being met in a public or private school, the child’s SEN is an important factor in their decision to homeschool. Furthermore, for all participating homeschooling parents (those with and without children with special educational needs) in this sample, the desire to be more involved in their children’s education was rated as the most important factor in the decision to homeschool.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Smith

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Development of a 50-State Typology of Education Governance

Joanna Smith

Hovanes Gasparian

ABSTRACT: To better understand the complexities of state education governance systems, this study uses Brewer and Smith’s (2008) framework to examine the structures, policies, and processes in each state’s K–12 education system. We conducted a legislative review to examine three dimensions of educational governance: (1) level of control, (2) distribution of authority, and (3) degree of participation. The resulting 7 indicators and 35 sub-indicators were weighted to create a typology that sorts states into eight possible designations. This typology enables policymakers and future researchers to understand how various policies enhance or inhibit educational goals in different state settings.

KEY WORDS: education governance, typology, education systems, education policy

Development of a 50-State Typology of Education Governance

Education policymaking often receives more limelight and more controversy than other governance decisions. It is a sphere where everyone has had some personal experience (from having been a student) and parents have a second, vicarious experience through their children. As a result, education policy decision-making at the state and local levels is rife with opinions and, often, strife, which if not led by them, in turn influences policymakers. Yet, the path of an education policy from formulation (e.g., the list of approved textbooks derived at the state level) to adoption at the district level (e.g., selection of certain textbooks from the state list), down to implementation at the classroom level (e.g., a teacher basing instruction and assessment on the selected text) is rarely straightforward. The various bumps and hurdles along the way are seldom understood by those arguing for a particular policy agenda.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843057

Bernato

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Aligning the Tuning Forks

Using the Intersections of Organizational Frames and Systems Disciplines: Facilitating Effective Collaboration between Schools Needing Improvement and Regional Improvement Agencies

Richard Bernato

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to align the needs and wants of schools in need of improvement and state, federal, and regional agencies charged with assisting them in their reform efforts by using spreadsheet thinking through two lenses, Bolman and Deal’s four organizational paradigms and Peter Senge’s five disciplines of a learning organization. Taken together, in a force-fitting Tuning Forks model approach, where analysts use the intersection of each framework insofar as they act on each other, enables school improvement collaborators to align new action perspectives.

This article is divided into three sections: The first part presents the context to the issues associated with collaboration between Regional Educational Improvement Agencies (REA) and Schools in Need of Improvement (SU). The second section provides descriptions of the two analytical dimensions. These are then synthesized into cross impact charts that demonstrate potential issues either driving or obstructing their collaborative efforts. A third section provides guidelines to minimize obstructions and promotes collaborative alignment between schools in need of reform and regional agencies charged with assisting their efforts.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843033

A Regional Network of Superintendents Confronting Equity

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Sharon D. Kruse

Katherine C. Rodela

Kristin S. Huggins

A Regional Network of Superintendents Confronting Equity

Public and Private Messy Messages

ABSTRACT: Research into equity leadership has been a growing focus within educational leadership. Few studies explore the role of the superintendent in equity work. Drawing from interview data and observation of monthly regional leadership meetings, this article examines how 12 superintendents describe their equity leadership practices. Focusing on the ways their practice is evidenced across public and private domains of talk and action, we employ the term “messy messages” to communicate the complex, fluid, and uncomfortable nature of this work. Discussion illustrates the complexity of district equity advocacy, and increasing need for social justice education in superintendent leadership preparation programs.

KEY WORDS: Superintendents, Equity Leadership, Social Justice

INTRODUCTION AND RATIONALE

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843040

Instruction to Author

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS

Submitting Papers to the Journal:

1. Manuscripts submitted for publication consideration should be sent electronically, via e-mail attachment, to Dr. Elizabeth Murakami and Dr. Natalie Tran, Editors, Journal of School Leadership, at jsl@unt.edu. Two (2) copies of the manuscript should be attached: a master copy, including a title page (see instructions below) and all citations and references, and a masked copy of the manuscript, with the title page and all other author identifying information removed (including citations and references pertaining to any of the contributing authors’ works). Attachments should be in Microsoft Word format. Authors will receive e-mail acknowledgment of receipt of their manuscript within two weeks of submission. If confirmation is not received within this period, contact the editor.

2. All manuscripts should be typed, double-spaced, and follow the style outlined in the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843040

Teacher Collaborative Action Research

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Katherine A. Curry

Jackie Mania-Singer

Ed Harris

Shawna Richardson

Teacher Collaborative Action Research

The Complexity of Professional Development in Rural and Alternative School Environments

ABSTRACT: This qualitative case study utilized distributed leadership theory and Capobianco and Feldman’s (2006) conceptualization of conditions for collaborative action research (CAR) to describe the implementation of CAR as professional development (PD) and school improvement strategy in two educational contexts, one alternative school and one rural, in a Midwestern state. Findings indicate that distributed leadership facilitates CAR as a powerful PD tool and results in development of action plans for school improvement; however, conditions are necessary for CAR to effect professional practice.

KEY WORDS: Action Research, Professional Development, Distributed Leadership, Rural Schools, Alternative Schools

Research is replete with evidence that continuing, practical PD is vital to school success (Darling-Hammond, Wei, Andree, Richardson, & Orphanos, 2009; Yoon, Duncan, Wen-Yu Lee, & Shapley, 2007; Zichner & Noffke, 2001). However, current financial situations and other barriers in states across the United States may limit the ability of districts to provide PD as effectively as they have in the past (Leachman, Albares, Masterson, & Wallace, 2016).

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843033

Principal Competencies That Make a Difference

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Dallas Hambrick Hitt

Dennis Woodruff

Coby V. Meyers

Guorong Zhu

Principal Competencies That Make a Difference

Identifying a Model for Leaders of School Turnaround

ABSTRACT: Literature in the field of school leadership substantiates principals’ influence on student achievement. Less clarity is available concerning principals’ influence on school turnaround or the competencies needed for principals to effectively engage in and sustain the turnaround of low-performing schools. This study seeks to illuminate principal competencies that support an individual’s ability to influence turnaround as evidenced by increased student achievement. We analyzed behavioral event interviews conducted with 19 principals whose schools experienced a rapid increase in student achievement. This sample is the successful 10% of a population of 200 principals who each attempted to lead a turnaround. From the interview data, we derived seven competencies that capture the specific characteristics and actions of principals leading turnaround. Our research provides an initial framework for the actions, behaviors, and dispositions of successful turnaround principals. Results of this study suggest ways to improve the selection and development of turnaround principals.

See All Chapters
Medium 9781475843040

Aerobic Physical Activity and the Leadership of Principals

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Kari Kiser

Jennifer Clayton

Aerobic Physical Activity and the Leadership of Principals

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to explore if there was a connection between regular aerobic physical activity and the stress and energy levels of principals as they reported it. The current aerobic physical activity level of principals was discovered. Energy and stress levels of principals who engage in aerobic physical activity, and those who do not, were determined. A survey administered via e-mail was distributed to a national sample of those in Center for Educational Improvement (CEI). The data were analyzed using frequencies and percentages, as well as chi square and t-tests. Findings revealed the majority of principals (65.7%, n = 73) did not engage in the recommended amount of aerobic physical activity and most principals (56.7%, n = 63) engage two days or less per week.

KEY WORDS: Aerobic Physical Activity, Principal Leadership, Stress, Energy

INTRODUCTION

See All Chapters

Load more