Medium 9781475827569

JSL Vol 26-N1

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JSL invites the submission of manuscripts that contribute to the exchange of ideas and scholarship about schools and leadership. All theoretical and methological approaches are welcome. We do not advocate or practice a bias toward any mode of inquiry (e.g., qualitative vs. quantitative; empirical vs. conceptual; discipline-based vs. interdisciplinary) and instead operate from the assumption that all careful and methodologically sound research has the potential to contribute to our understanding of school leadership. We strongly encourage authors to consider both the local and global implications of their work. The journal’s goal is to clearly communicate with a diverse audience including both school-based and university-based educators. The journal embraces a board conception of school leadership and welcomes manuscripts that reflect the diversity of ways in which this term is understood. The journal is interested not only in manuscripts that focus on administrative leadership in schools and school districts, but also in manuscripts that inquire about teacher, student, parent, and community leadership.

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6 Articles

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Principals’ Uses and Interpretations of Student Growth Percentile Data

ePub

Amanda L. CLAUSER

Lisa A. Keller

Kathryn A. McDermott

Principals’ Uses and Interpretations of Student Growth Percentile Data

Address correspondence to Amanda L. Clauser, EdD, National Board of Medical Examiners, 3750 Market Street, Philadelphia PA 19104. E-mail: aclauser@nbme.org.

ABSTRACT: Increasing numbers of states have incorporated measures of students’ academic growth into their data and accountability policies. Measuring growth is a statistically complicated task and complex growth measures can be easy to misinterpret. This paper reports on a survey of 317 Massachusetts principals’ understanding of the Student Growth Percentile (SGP), a popular growth model. The survey was designed to produce information about how Massachusetts principals use and interpret the SGP and the extent to which they have misconceptions about what SGPs mean. The survey reveals some common misconceptions, often based on confusion about the differences between the norm-referenced SGP and the state’s criterion-referenced assessments. We conclude that there is a risk that principals will make inappropriate decisions based on SGPs. Because of their central role in school improvement, principals need better opportunities to learn about how to use SGP and other growth model data.

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The Scholar–Practitioner Ideal: Toward a Socially Just Educational Administration for the 21st Century

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Charles L. Lowery

The Scholar–Practitioner Ideal

Toward a Socially Just Educational Administration for the 21st Century

Address correspondence to Charles L. Lowery, Ohio University, Lindley Hall N285, Athens, Ohio 47501, 903 539-6926. E-mail: loweryc@ohio.edu.

ABSTRACT: The scholar–practitioner leadership model as presented in this paper refers to an ideal that is delineated in a set of literature that emphasizes a unique paradigm of scholarly practice in educational administration. Specifically, this article focuses on reviewing prior and emerging theoretical perspectives as typifications, or the ideal, of the scholar–practitioner educational leader for school administration as defined in a specific regional university doctoral program. Primarily, the synthesis of these sources supporting this theoretical study focuses on the literature presented in this program and centers on, but are not limited to, Foster (1984, 1989), Capper (1998), Horn (2000, 2009), Jenlink (2001, 2006, 2010), Giroux (1992, 1994), Mullen (2003), and Starratt (2001, 2005). Synthesizing the literature, a conceptualization of the scholar–practitioner develops as a school leader who embodies an ability to face the continuously emerging concerns that are the norm in current educational settings. The conclusion is that aspiring to the ideal of the scholar–practitioner will supply school administrators with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills that the 21st century will demand.

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The Uncertainty of High Expectations: How Principals Influence Relational Trust and Teacher Turnover in No Excuses Charter Schools

ePub

A. CHRIS TORRES

The Uncertainty of High Expectations

How Principals Influence Relational Trust and Teacher Turnover in No Excuses Charter Schools

Address correspondence to A. Chris Torres, PhD, College of Education and Human Services, Department of Counseling and Educational Leadership, Montclair State University, 1 Normal Avenue: University Hall 3156, Montclair, NJ 07043, 973-655-7402. E-mail: torresch@mail.montclair.edu.

ABSTRACT: Teacher turnover continues to be a chronic problem for low-income schools and is especially high in urban charter schools. New evidence shows that teachers’ perceptions of school leadership and trust are two of the most powerful predictors of turnover. Using interviews with former No Excuses charter school (NECS) teachers, this study seeks to better explain the mechanisms influencing teacher turnover by analyzing teachers’ perceptions of what principals do to influence relational trust and describing how this influences teachers’ decisions to leave. Findings show how high and often-implicit expectations principals have for teachers affect teacher–principal trust relationships in ways that lead to turnover.

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Predictors of New Teacher Satisfaction in Urban Schools: Effects of Personal Characteristics, General Job Facets, and Teacher-Specific Job Facets

ePub

AIMEE M. GREEN

MARCO A. MUÑOZ

Predictors of New Teacher Satisfaction in Urban Schools

Effects of Personal Characteristics, General Job Facets, and Teacher-Specific Job Facets

Address correspondence to Aimee M. Green, PhD, Jefferson County Public Schools, Human Resources, 3332 Newburg Road, Louisville, KY 40218. E-mail: aimee.green@jefferson.kyschools.us

ABSTRACT: This study addressed the problem of job satisfaction of new teachers in large urban school districts. Understanding what contributes to job satisfaction of new teachers has implications for retention strategies supporting cost-effective human capital management as well as for improving working conditions and performance in the educational accountability era. The study used personal characteristics, general job facets, and specific job facets as predictors. The full set of predictor variables explained 71% of the variance in new teacher job satisfaction. The study found that overall new teacher job satisfaction correlates with (a) preparedness, (b) leadership, (c) independence, (d) time, and (e) benefits. Addressing each correlate could likely increase new teacher job satisfaction and retention in the teaching profession particularly in the high-need, hard-to-staff schools. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

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Resisting Social Justice: Rural School Principals’ Perceptions of LGBTQ Students

ePub

HOLLY N. BISHOP

RHONDA L. MCCLELLAN

Resisting Social Justice

Rural School Principals’ Perceptions of LGBTQ Students 1

Address correspondence to Holly N. Bishop, PhD, 2417 Westridge Dr., Plano, TX 75075. E-mail: hnb73@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT: This qualitative study explores how rural high school principals perceive and support LGBTQ students. Through semistructured interviews of these principals, we examine how the context of the schools, specifically rural communities with conservative values, affects principals’ perceptions and implementation of a positive climate for all students. The study’s findings suggest that these leaders upheld community normative values by exhibiting their own bias against LGBTQ students. Insights drawn here indicate that the school leader’s position within and affinity toward rural school communities provide a unique context for examining equity constraints. Theoharis’ (2007) framework of resistance for social justice leaders is used as a reference for viewing these rural principals, and the study offers an extension to his three-prong model.

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Increasing Latina/o Student Success: Examining Culturally Responsive College Readiness in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas

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Taryn Gallego Ozuna

VICTOR B. SAENZ

Tracy Arámbula Ballysingh

ERICA K. YAMAMURA

Increasing Latina/o Student Success

Examining Culturally Responsive College Readiness in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas

Address correspondence to Taryn G. Ozuna, PhD, Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies, The University of Texas at Arlington, Box #19575, 701 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019-0575. E-mail: tozuna@uta.edu

ABSTRACT: Drawing upon Franquiz & Salazar’s (2004) humanizing pedagogy, this qualitative case study explored the perspectives of 22 school and community leaders in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. Focus group narratives revealed that school teachers, administrators, and community leaders emphasized a culturally responsive approach to overcoming obstacles and promoting college readiness in this region. In addition, these stakeholders highlighted the importance of collaborative and asset-based strategies in promoting college readiness. To them, college readiness should include strong relationships among schools, families, and community leaders, and it should extend beyond traditional academic preparation in the classroom.

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