Medium 9781475827552

JEBPS Vol 15-N1

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The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school psychologists and educators through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines.

The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools differs from other scholarly journals in that it features articles that demonstrate empirically-based procedures for readers to apply the practice in their setting. The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school psychologists and educators through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines.

The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools differs from other scholarly journals in that it features articles that demonstrate empirically-based procedures for readers to apply the practice in their setting.

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Introduction to the Issue

ePub

JOURNAL OF

EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES
FOR SCHOOLS

 

EDITORIAL POLICY

The mission of the Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is to positively influence the daily practice of school psychologists and educators through dissemination of studies demonstrating the successful application of an evidence-based practice for an educational setting. We invite the submission of manuscripts that advance this mission by using nontechnical language that (1) outlines an evidence-based practice; (2) describes the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice; (3) describes the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting; and (4) provides readers with the information they need to implement the practice in their own schools.

Single subject, small N, and case studies are welcomed. Program evaluation and large-group studies are also encouraged if specific guidelines for practitioners are provided for application in an educational setting. All data-based articles will be expected to include a separate 1–3-page section titled Implementation Guidelines that summarizes the evidence-based practice and can be used as a pullout handout in educational settings for guiding implementation of the practice. Because the mission of the journal is to extend and improve upon practice, not necessarily research, prior publication of the research supporting a particular practice's effectiveness will not exclude manuscripts for consideration for publication in the journal. It may be that an author publishes a research article describing methodology and results of an applied-research project for another journal and then writes a different manuscript for this journal that describes and provides demonstration of successful application of that research-based practice for school psychologists and educators.

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Implementing Modeling and Self-Monitoring With a Daily Behavior Report Card in a Tier-2 Reading Group: A Pilot Study of Feasibility

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Implementing Modeling and Self-Monitoring With a Daily Behavior Report Card in a Tier-2 Reading Group: A Pilot Study of Feasibility

Lisa M. Hagermoser Sanetti
Sandra M. Chafouleas
Melissa L. Berggren
Michael Faggella-Luby
Justin R. Byron

ABSTRACT: There has been little research evaluating feasible, evidence-based pedagogical and behavioral strategies to increase academic engagement during Tier-2 instruction. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of a teacher implementing (a) modeling, (b) self-monitoring with Daily Behavior Report Card (DBRC), or (c) both during a Tier-2 reading group after viewing a DVD training module. In addition, students’ academic engagement was evaluated across all phases. Results indicate that it is feasible for a teacher to implement modeling and/or self-monitoring with DBRC during Tier-2 literacy with a high level of treatment integrity after viewing a DVD training module. In addition, student outcomes suggest that high-quality self-monitoring implementation can result in increasing trends in academic engagement and that high-quality implementation of both strategies may result in slightly higher levels of academic engagement than either strategy alone. Implementation guidelines and implications for practice and applied research are presented.

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Peer-Mediated Social Skills Intervention for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Peer-Mediated Social Skills Intervention for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Elizabeth L. W. McKenney

Ashley Dorton Tate

Stephen D. A. Hupp

Gregory E. Everett

ABSTRACT: A social skills intervention (Tsao & Odom, 2006) was adapted for use in schools to increase initiations and responses demonstrated by upper elementary students with ASD and their typically developing peers. Unlike previous studies, students with ASD participated in all intervention sessions alongside peers. Students with ASD and a typically developing peer were introduced to the intervention in a multiple baseline across participant dyads design. Results indicate that this type of brief, school-based intervention can improve the frequency of social contact between students with ASD and their peers. Limitations, including some due to multiple-baseline carryover effects, are discussed.

Address correspondence to: Elizabeth McKenney, Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Campus Box 1121, Edwardsville, IL, 62025. Tel: (618) 650-2265. Fax: (618) 650-5087. E-mail: elmcken@siue.edu

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Effects of Numbered Heads Together on the Science Quiz Performance of 9th Grade Students

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Effects of Numbered Heads Together on the Science Quiz Performance of 9th Grade Students

Cindy McMillen

Barbara Mallette

Cynthia Smith

Janeil Rey

Michael Jabot

Jean Michielli-Pendl

Larry Maheady

ABSTRACT: Getting all students to participate actively during large and small group instruction is a significant instructional challenge. Unfortunately, most teachers rely on voluntary individual recitation (e.g., hand-raising in large groups) which limits active engagement to responding students. Moreover, high performing students respond more often to teacher questions while others remain passive. This study examined the effects of Numbered Heads Together (NHT), a cooperative learning structure, on the weekly science quiz scores of a 9th grade, culturally diverse class. Researchers used an A-B-A-B design and found that NHT produced immediate improvements in students’ science quiz scores which were replicated in subsequent phases. Students and the teacher rated the intervention favorably.

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Effects of Direct Instruction Flashcards and Racetrack on Basic Multiplication Facts Mastery

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Effects of Direct Instruction Flashcards and Racetrack on Basic Multiplication Facts Mastery

Bethany Norris

Phillip J. Belfiore

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of direct instruction flashcards and mathematics racetrack on multiplication fact accuracy, maintenance, and generalization. Training data were also collected to monitor rate of correct fact fluency. Using a multiple baseline across similar instructional sets, the results of this study add to the existing applied research base on the effectiveness of direct instruction on basic mathematic skills, as well as extend the existing research base by (a) increasing the number of unknown facts to nine per set, (b) assessing generalization from written fact mastery to written word problems, (c) including training fluency measures, and (d) employing typical classroom personnel to conduct all phases of the study. Results are discussed in relation to the database extensions observed, and the need for educational research and classroom teachers to work closely to connect research-validated practices with day-to-day classroom implementation of that instructional evidence.

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Implementing the Reread-Adapt and Answer-Comprehend Intervention and Reinforcement Contingency for Learners With Intellectual Disability

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Implementing the Reread-Adapt and Answer-Comprehend Intervention and Reinforcement Contingency for Learners With Intellectual Disability

Youjia Hua

Jeremy W. Ford

Chengan Yuan

Kristin Monroe

William J. Therrien

ABSTRACT: Reread-Adapt and Answer-Comprehend (RAAC) is a research-based reading intervention that teaches both oral reading fluency (ORF) and reading comprehension for learners who struggle with reading. We delivered the RAAC intervention to three students with intellectual disability (ID) in a postsecondary education setting. Initially, two of the students did not make satisfactory progress during the intervention. Based on their ORF data, we hypothesized that the two learners had a performance deficit and needed additional motivation to maintain their engagement. In order to identify and remediate the performance deficit, we incorporated a reward contingency in the RAAC intervention. In the context of a single-subject research design, we verified our hypothesis and demonstrated a functional relation between the intervention and student ORF and reading comprehension.

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