Medium 9781475824407

JEBPS Vol 8-N1

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The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school-based professionals through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines. The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools differs from other scholarly journals in that it features articles that demonstrate empirically-based procedures for readers to apply the practice in their setting.

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Introduction to the Special Issue, From the Wing Institute Summit

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T. Steuart Watson

This issue of JEBPS is special in many regards. First, it represents the first time that the journal has published three issues in one year. Second, it reflects the proceedings of the first Wing Institute Summit, in 2006. The Wing Institute is an independent, nonprofit organization whose primary purpose is to promote evidence-based education policies and practices. Given its purpose, it is only fitting that a journal that includes in its title evidence-based practices in schools would be an outlet to publicize the proceedings. Through its website, the Wing Institute has designed an interactive knowledge network; an information clearinghouse; and professional forums for those interested in obtaining information, sharing ideas, collaborating, and promoting evidence-based policies and practices within their educational system. The Wing Institute also disseminates a variety of publications to assist educators with implementing evidence-based practices, and it funds graduate student research on evidence-based education.

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Roles and Responsibilities of Researchers and Practitioners for Translating Research to Practice

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Mark D. Shriver

ABSTRACT: An important, if not defining, characteristic of evidence-based education is that of translating research to practice. Translating research to practice requires purposeful action on the part of researchers and practitioners alike. Researchers and practitioners involved in translating research to practice include teachers and other frontline educators, administrators, trainers, and policymakers. This article reviews and discusses the roles and responsibilities of practitioners and researchers who are translating research to practice as part of a culture of evidence-based education. Analyses of professional roles and responsibilities of researchers and practitioners are presented. In addition, some of the difficulties with changing roles and responsibilities are highlighted. Suggested are initial steps that researchers and practitioners may take in establishing an evidence-based education culture that facilitates translating research to practice.

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A Roadmap to Evidence-Based Education: Building an Evidence-Based Culture

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Ronnie Detrich
Randy Keyworth
Jack States

ABSTRACT: The emphasis on evidence-based interventions in No Child Left Behind and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act has created an unprecedented opportunity to ensure that all students receive the positive benefits of research-based interventions. Despite this legal impetus, the implementation of evidence-based interventions is not an entirely straightforward process. It is often mistakenly assumed that once an evidence-based intervention is developed, it will automatically be implemented in school settings. The purpose of this article is to propose a roadmap of evidence-based education that highlights some of the complexities of moving from research to practice. This roadmap illustrates the necessary and reciprocal nature of influence between research and practice if an evidence-based decision-making approach is to be widely implemented.

No Child Left Behind (2002) emphasizes the use of evidence-based interventions to improve educational outcomes for public school students. The stated goal of No Child Left Behind is that every student in America will be performing at the proficient level in reading and math by 2014. The emphasis on evidence-based interventions is clear throughout the legislation. References to scientific, research-based instruction occur more than 100 times. Similarly, the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (2005) encourages evidence-based interventions for students in special education. Specifically, it calls for preservice and professional development to ensure that teachers are able to use scientifically based instructional practices—such as early reading programs, positive behavior interventions and supports, and early intervention services—to reduce the need to identify students as being disabled in order to address their learning and behavioral needs. The individualized education program should include statement of special education and related services, and it should be based on peer-reviewed research. Clearly, the intent of the federal education agencies is to use evidence-based practices to address the academic and behavioral concerns of America’s school-age children.

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Establishing and Sustaining Statewide Positive Behavior Supports Implementation: A Description of Maryland’s Model

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Teri Lewis-Palmer
Susan Barrett

ABSTRACT: Supporting students with problem behavior continues to challenge public schools. Additionally, federal legislation and mandates such as Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act and No Child Left Behind have simultaneously increased schools’ requirements to support all students and decreased or strained limited existing resources. Faced with decreasing resources, schools require strategies and systems that are effective and efficient. Schoolwide positive behavior supports1 combine primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention interventions in a systematic way so that the school climate is positive and so that children who are at risk for, or already involved in, antisocial behavior receive specialized interventions. The key elements of schoolwide positive behavior supports include practices-supporting student behavior, systems-supporting staff behavior, and data-supporting decision making that result in outcomes of social competence and academic achievement. Systems approaches require designed and sustained implementation in schools. To achieve this goal, critical features that support large-scale adoption and systems are necessary to facilitate sustained use and so must be identified through research and evaluation efforts. The focus of this article is on describing the critical features of schoolwide positive behavior supports using Maryland as a working example of large-scale implementation.

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No Child Left Behind, Contingencies, and Utah’s Alternate Assessment

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Karen D. Hager
Timothy A. Slocum
Ronnie Detrich

ABSTRACT: The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) can be understood as a set of contingencies designed to change the behavior of educators and thereby produce higher academic performance. NCLB makes a range of negative consequences contingent on failure to produce adequate yearly progress (AYP); thus, the measurement of AYP is extremely important. AYP is typically determined through annual accountability testing, and students with significant cognitive disabilities contribute to AYP through alternate assessment procedures. The nature and validity of alternate assessments may have a substantial impact on the effects of the contingencies of NCLB on programs for these students. Utah’s alternate assessment was designed to direct the power of these contingencies toward improving important educational outcomes for students with significant cognitive disabilities. This alternate assessment is based on direct observation of students performing functional language arts and mathematics tasks in natural settings, and it explicitly requires evidence of generalization. This functional orientation is crucial for ensuring that the power of NCLB contingencies acts to motivate effective teaching of important skills. This approach can be adopted by other states and school districts.

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