Medium 9781475824308

JEBPS Vol 6-N1

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The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school-based professionals through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines. The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools differs from other scholarly journals in that it features articles that demonstrate empirically-based procedures for readers to apply the practice in their setting.

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Bridging the Great Divide: Linking Research to Practice in Scholarly Publications

ePub

Mark D. Shriver
T. Steuart Watson

ABSTRACT: Research to practice is a term that has received increasing attention in public policy, professional literature, and practice guidelines for educators and school psychologists. In this article, we define what constitutes a research to practice study and differentiate the terms research to practice and evidence-based practice. We argue that dissemination of research to practice studies requires a different set of guidelines for scholarly publication. We present five characteristics of research to practice studies that need to be addressed in the dissemination of research-based practice through scholarly publication. Finally, we discuss barriers to publication of research to practice articles and suggest that practitioners and researchers alike begin to advocate for greater recognition of the importance of research to practice studies and articles.

There are literally hundreds of journals in psychology and hundreds more in education. The vast preponderance of these journals are dedicated to publishing original research that contributes to the body of knowledge in the general field and/or to a highly specialized branch of that field. Other types of articles published in current journals typically include literature reviews, meta-analyses, expository/opinion pieces, and heuristic articles. As such, much that is published in scholarly journals is intended for other scholars and those conducting and publishing research. However, most individuals who work as psychologists or educators are not researchers. In both psychology and education, a vast majority of those with advanced degrees engage in the practice of their profession (i.e., practitioners) and are consumers (not producers) of research. For example, school psychologists spend an average of only 1 hour per week in research (Hosp & Reschly, 2002). Subsequently, the type of scientific information needed by practitioners differs greatly from the type of information needed by researchers.

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Collaborating With Parents to Improve Children’s Reading

ePub

Rachel J. Valleley
John C. Begeny
Mark D. Shriver

ABSTRACT: A brief oral reading assessment was conducted to determine the most effective reading fluency intervention for a third-grade boy. The results of this assessment indicated that a combined reading intervention package seemed most effective for improving reading fluency. The participant's mother was then taught how to conduct the reading interventions in the home and was taught a technique to teach basic sight-words. Reading progress was monitored and modifications to the reading program were made dependent upon the child's progress. Findings of this study suggested that the mother reliably implemented the recommended reading interventions and the participant demonstrated reading fluency improvements. Limitations and implications of this study are discussed.

Reading is an important skill that children must learn to be successful both in the school environment and in the community. However, many children struggle to become competent readers. In their most recent evaluation of students’ reading achievement at grade four, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES, 2004) reported that 37% of children read below the basic level. This percentage has been relatively consistent over the past 10 years, and 26% of these students still do not read at a basic level by the eighth grade (NCES, 2004).

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Examining the Efficacy of Performance Feedback and Goal-Setting Interventions in Children With ADHD: A Comparison of Two Methods of Goal Setting

ePub

Robin S. Codding, Lawrence Lewandowski, and Tanya Eckert

ABSTRACT: Children with attention deficient hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have demonstrated significant academic problems and are often at risk for school failure. In particular, math seems to be an area of difficulty for children with ADHD. Although academic problems are prevalent in children with ADHD, few studies have investigated the efficacy of school-based interventions to increase academic success. The intent of this study was to use performance feedback and goal setting as an intervention to increase the mathematics fluency of two children (one boy, one girl) in fourth and fifth grades who have ADHD. The specific purposes of this study included: (1) examining the efficacy of performance feedback (presented both verbally and graphically) and goal setting to increase math fluency for children who have ADHD; (2) determining whether the method of goal setting, that is either self-selection or experimenter assignment of goals, has a differential effect on math fluency; and (3) assessing student acceptability of the performance feedback interventions. An alternating treatments (single-case) design was used to explore the efficacy of two performance feedback and goal-setting interventions. Differentiation among treatment methods was obtained for both students, with students performing better under the performance feedback intervention in which students selected their performance goals. Results suggested that performance feedback with student-selected goal setting is an acceptable and possibly an effective school-based intervention for children with ADHD.

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Using MathFacts in a Flash to Enhance Computational Fluency

ePub

Jim Ysseldyke
Teri Thill
Jennifer Pohl
Dan Bolt

ABSTRACT: MathFacts in a Flash is a computer-assisted drill and practice program designed to assist students in attaining automaticity with facts and to assist teachers in monitoring the progress of all of the students in their class. We investigated the effectiveness of the program with 4,224 elementary and middle school students. When the program is implemented according to publisher recommendations, and when it is appropriately matched to student skill level, MathFacts in a Flash is effective. Unfortunately, implementation integrity during the study was neither uniformly high nor consistent. A highlight of this study was illustration of the very significant effect of intervention integrity on programs such as MathFacts in a Flash.

It is estimated that about 5% to 10% of students enrolled in general education classrooms have difficulty learning mathematics (Rivera, 1997). The numbers are higher for students with disabilities and in most large cities (Geary, 1994; Mercer, 1997). One cause of math learning difficulties is poor fit between the learning characteristics of individual students and the math instruction they receive (Carnine, 1997). Other causes include specific student difficulties in memorizing basic knowledge, application of cognitive and metacognitive strategies, and generalization of knowledge and strategies to new situations (Kroesbergen & Van Luit, 2003). At the heart of the difficulties many students experience is a failure to develop computational fluency and automaticity with basic math facts.

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FEATURE ARTICLE

ePub

Suzanne L. Nichols
Stephen D. A. Hupp
Jeremy D. Jewell
Colleen S. Zeigler

ABSTRACT: Despite the fact that there are very few well-controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of social stories, the intervention is frequently used as a treatment option for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This review includes 10 published studies with experimental research designs. The review also includes discussion of case studies, quasiexperimental design studies, and unpublished doctoral dissertations. Overall, the majority of the studies reported favorable results; however, many of the studies included one or more methodological problems that hindered their interpretation. An appendix includes several examples of the social stories used in the published experimental studies.

Recent legislation in the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 reflects a growing movement that emphasizes accountability in the public schools (Public Law 107-110). Schools are held accountable by setting standards of performance and assessing progress toward goals. Essential to this process is the need for schools to utilize evidence-based interventions that are evaluated through scientifically rigorous research (Stoiber & Kratochwill, 2001). In fact, Sclafani (2002), counselor to the secretary of education, emphasized that one of the four principles of the current national education agenda is to “research what works” (p. 44). Social stories, a current intervention intended to positively impact the behavior of youth diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), exemplifies a relatively new intervention whose empirical support is currently being investigated.

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Review of Social Story Interventions for Children Diagnosed With Autism Spectrum Disorders

ePub

Suzanne L. Nichols
Stephen D. A. Hupp
Jeremy D. Jewell
Colleen S. Zeigler

ABSTRACT: Despite the fact that there are very few well-controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of social stories, the intervention is frequently used as a treatment option for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This review includes 10 published studies with experimental research designs. The review also includes discussion of case studies, quasiexperimental design studies, and unpublished doctoral dissertations. Overall, the majority of the studies reported favorable results; however, many of the studies included one or more methodological problems that hindered their interpretation. An appendix includes several examples of the social stories used in the published experimental studies.

Recent legislation in the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 reflects a growing movement that emphasizes accountability in the public schools (Public Law 107-110). Schools are held accountable by setting standards of performance and assessing progress toward goals. Essential to this process is the need for schools to utilize evidence-based interventions that are evaluated through scientifically rigorous research (Stoiber & Kratochwill, 2001). In fact, Sclafani (2002), counselor to the secretary of education, emphasized that one of the four principles of the current national education agenda is to “research what works” (p. 44). Social stories, a current intervention intended to positively impact the behavior of youth diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), exemplifies a relatively new intervention whose empirical support is currently being investigated.

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