Medium 9781475824391

JEBPS Vol 7-N2

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The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school-based professionals through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines. The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools differs from other scholarly journals in that it features articles that demonstrate empirically-based procedures for readers to apply the practice in their setting.

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4 Articles

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The Effect of Performance Contingencies on Correct Responding on Measures of Early Literacy

ePub

Carmen Broussard

Amanda VanDerHeyden

Melanie Fabre

Jessica Stanley

Shannah Ordoynne

ABSTRACT: This study attempted to extend the work related to functional academic assessment of young children enrolled in public preschool. The effect of access to preferred items and the escape from the task on a rhyming assessment were evaluated relative to baseline performance within an alternating-treatments design with 25 children. Item access and task breaks were delivered on a variable-ratio schedule of reinforcement contingent on correct responding on a 2-minute rhyming probe. Baseline probe administration consisted of massed trials with no programmed breaks or reinforcement. Roughly half of the participants performed at differentially higher rates to earn rewards and/or breaks during the task. Six children who performed similarly under each of the assessment conditions (i.e., un-differentiated patterns of responding) were exposed to subsequent instruction. Four of these children showed improved performance following instruction relative to performance during the assessment phase. This research provides an example of the use of reinforcement to increase performance in skills related to academic readiness and the use of structured practice for those who do not show improved performance with reinforcement alone.

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Peer Tutoring for Reading Fluency: Student Implementation and Effects on Reading Fluency

ePub

Brad A. Dufrene

Carlen Henington

A. Elizabeth Townsend

ABSTRACT: A substantial body of literature is available regarding effective procedures for increasing reading fluency, but education professionals continue to seek resource-efficient means of delivering these interventions. Peer tutoring can potentially provide an efficient means for wide-scale implementation of reading fluency interventions. The current study examined the effectiveness of a peer-tutoring procedure that included passage previewing, repeated readings, contingent reward, and progress monitoring. Additionally, data were collected regarding tutor implementation of the peer-tutoring procedure. Eight elementary-age children participated in the study. Results indicate that tutees’ reading fluency increased following intervention. Additionally, tutors were able to implement the procedure with moderate-to-high integrity. Results are discussed in terms of educational practice.

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Collaborating With Kindergarten Teachers to Increase Student Compliance With Classroom Rules

ePub

Laura Staples

Kara E. McGoey

Richard J. Cowan

Nicole Crist

Melody Tankersley

ABSTRACT: This study measured the effects of 2 classwide interventions developed to increase kindergarten students’ compliance with classroom rules in a school district in northeast Ohio. Behavioral consultation was used to achieve entry into the classroom system, analyze the classroom environment, develop and implement the interventions, and conduct treatment evaluation. Based on a review of baseline data and teacher objectives for each classroom, a response cost system was implemented in both classrooms. Participants included all children enrolled in two kindergarten classrooms. This study used an A–B design with one partial replication (2 classrooms total). Direct observation methods were used to assess treatment integrity. Results indicated an increase in following classroom rules during intervention. Both teachers reported satisfaction with the intervention and implemented it daily with fidelity during intervention and follow-up. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

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Compliance Training and Positive Peer Reporting With a 4-Year-Old in a Preschool Classroom

ePub

Kristin N. Johnson-Gros and Mark D. Shriver

ABSTRACT: Compliance training packages initially developed for parent training to reduce noncompliant and aggressive behavior in young children have demonstrated some promising outcomes when used in classrooms. It is not uncommon, however, for children with a history of noncompliance and aggressive behavior to exhibit social skill deficits and poor peer relationships. Improved compliance following implementation of compliance training may not have an effect on a child’s social skills and positive peer relationships. The study utilized an A–B–B+C design to evaluate the effects of compliance training and positive peer reporting on compliance and social behaviors. A teacher was taught to implement a compliance training package with a 4-year-old preschool male who was exhibiting noncompliant and aggressive behaviors. Immediate improvements in compliance and negative social behaviors were noted. However, improvements in positive social behaviors and positive peer interactions were not observed. An intervention based on positive peer reporting was then implemented. Results of the positive peer reporting on social behaviors are presented. Implications when consulting with teachers to improve children’s compliance and social behaviors are offered.

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