Medium 9781475823905

Jspr Vol 28-N4

Views: 1308
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Public Relations is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies and descriptions of best practices in six critical areas of school administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management. Practitioners, policymakers, consultants and professors rely on the Journal for cutting-edge ideas and current knowledge. Articles are a blend of research and practice addressing contemporary issues ranging from passing bond referenda to building support for school programs to integrating modern information.

List price: $20.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Notes From the Editor

ePub

THEODORE J. KOWALSKI

The Journal of School Public Relations publishes a combination of research and best practice articles. This issue includes four articles that detail effective applications of public relations.

The first is by Marsha Chappelow and Kathleen Reznikov, both administrators in the Ladue School District, in suburban St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. Chappelow, a member of the journal’s editorial board, became president of the National School Public Relations Association on October 1, 2007. She is a frequent contributor and a leading expert on school public relations.

The second article is by James L. Gentilucci, an assistant professor at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. His article describes successful communication management during a crisis.

Civic engagement is the primary topic of the third article, and it is authored by three district administrators: Patricia Brenneman (superintendent), Ronda Johnson (treasurer), and Tracy Pirkle (director of instruction), from the Oak Hills Local School District located in suburban Cincinnati, Ohio. They share insights about conducting democratic discourse and managing conflict that inevitably ensues from political conversations.

See All Chapters

Rebuilding Trust and Relationships Between Your Community and School District

ePub

MARSHA CHAPPELOW

KATHLEEN REZNIKOV

ABSTRACT: After a failed tax levy in 2004, the Ladue School District in Missouri realized that it had to significantly change its communication methods. A new superintendent was hired in July 2004 to work with the Board of Education to reestablish relationships and increase effective communications with parents and community members. As such, we are the communication professionals who led the district leadership through the development and implementation of a strategic communications plan. We used the RACE planning model, promoted by the National School Public Relations Association. Although community trust has been reestablished, we continue the journey of constantly reevaluating and refining our plan.

The Ladue School District—for years, those four words brought up visions of success, affluence, and high-achieving students to most parents and educators throughout the state of Missouri. In the summer of 2004, however, the district had suffered a crushing tax levy election defeat and was 2 years away from being “financially distressed,” according to state guidelines, if it did not make significant cuts to its budget. When a tax levy fails, it is rarely for just one reason. There are typically several reasons that lead to the defeat. This was true for the Ladue School District, among them a lack of consistent leadership between the board and the superintendent, increasing expenses leading to financial concerns, and a lack of communication and relationships with the community.

See All Chapters

Managing Communication During a School Crisis: A Case Study

ePub

JAMES L. GENTILUCCI

ABSTRACT: Crisis communication training of school principals is problematic because it overemphasizes media relations and underemphasizes the critical importance of immediate and personal communication with students, staff, and parents—those most affected by school crises. A case study involving the death of a student in a small rural school explains why insider-first communication should be principals’ first priority during an emergency. It describes how the approach was successfully used and how it increased public confidence in the crisis management abilities of a principal and his staff. Analysis of the case provides several important lessons for principals who face similar circumstances: Be proactive and take charge of communication; communicate first and personally with those most affected by a crisis; speak through the media with one voice; seek the advice and expertise of others; adapt communication plans as necessary; manage public perception from the inside out; and learn from mistakes.

See All Chapters

Authentic Political Conversation: What It Does and Does Not Do

ePub

PATRICIA BRENNEMAN

RONDA JOHNSON

TRACY PIRKLE

ABSTRACT: Authentic political conversation entails identifying the work, bringing together stakeholders, providing information, framing questions, giving individuals a voice, being transparent, and acting on the values of the group’s collective good. Through this process, we identify common core values and respond to the basic human need to be connected—to become part of important work and set the course of our collective future. Oak Hills Local School District used this process to educate its community about Ohio school funding and engage community members in making funding decisions. The community was given an active role in setting the school board’s fiscal course. Organizational leaders enjoyed the benefit of understanding the community, and the public made a decision in the best interest of the greater good.

Through authentic political conversation, we bring people to the table, provide information, and ask them what they think. Collective hopes, dreams, and aspirations are explored. Through shared decision making, participants become engaged owners through a well-thought-out process. Organizational leaders then enjoy the benefit of understanding the pulse of the community and the support of those who help craft the future of the work.

See All Chapters

Unmasking Subtle and Concealed Aspects of Parent Involvement: Perspectives From African American Parents in the Urban South

ePub

TONDRA L. LODER-JACKSON

ANDREW N. MCKNIGHT

MICHAEL BROOKS

KENNETH MCGREW

DEBORAH VOLTZ

ABSTRACT: Focus group findings from 34 African American parents in an urban southern school district unmask subtle and concealed aspects of involvement. In contrast to formalized school-sponsored parent activities, involvement is described by participants as their encompassing a physical presence at the school to monitor their children’s behavior, receiving timely communication from teachers, helping with homework, and being an advocate for their children.

The inescapable mandate of the No Child Left Behind Act has placed the national spotlight on the critical importance of family involvement in urban education. One of the four pillars of the act is to create choices for parents in the education of their children. Two major premises of the law are that parents are their children’s first and most important teachers and that student success hinges on parents’ active involvement in their children’s learning. Yet urban schools are lacking viable strategies and support to meet this challenge. We believe that urban schools have fallen short in this area because of a perceived lack of respect, fairness, and cultural understanding, particularly about the meanings and conceptions of what constitutes appropriate types and acceptable levels of parent involvement between low-income and working-class African American parents and middle-class-oriented school personnel. These alienating perceptions are deeply rooted in race, class, and status divisions that exist in American society, coupled with inherent role conflicts between parents (namely, mothers) and teachers (primarily, female teachers).

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061730
Isbn
9781475823905
File size
844 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata