Medium 9781475823943

Jspr Vol 29-N4

Views: 931
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Public Relations is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies and descriptions of best practices in six critical areas of school administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management. Practitioners, policymakers, consultants and professors rely on the Journal for cutting-edge ideas and current knowledge. Articles are a blend of research and practice addressing contemporary issues ranging from passing bond referenda to building support for school programs to integrating modern information.

List price: $20.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Notes From the Editor

ePub

THEODORE J. KOWALSKI

Excluding students from school is a difficult decision because of legal and social constraints and because of the need to address individual and social rights. Finding ways to make expulsion or suspension a formative experience for students is professionally challenging. In the first article in this edition, Brenda S. Hall and Tova Rubin, from North Dakota State University, describe their research that focuses on a pilot project carried out in nine North Carolina school districts from 2003 to 2005. The project is an innovative program that places students who are suspended for an extended period, with community nonprofit organizations. The intent of the program is to increase the probability that the students will be more successful when they return to school—namely, as a result of having acquired skills and having personally developed.

In the second article, Ann Allen, from Ohio State University, presents research on school elections in Michigan. Using interview data, she explores the possible association between the political structure in which elections occur and the leadership perspectives on developing and maintaining positive connections with stakeholders. Study outcomes indicate that stronger relationships between schools and communities exist in districts where the politics of the election process has not been minimized.

See All Chapters

Community Service Programs: A Model for At-Risk Long-Term-Suspended Students

ePub

BRENDA S. HALL

TOVA RUBIN

ABSTRACT: Each year in the United States, millions of students experience suspension from public schools (Mendez & Knoff, 2003). Community service programs provide one means to address the school suspension problem. These initiatives are characterized by volunteer service placements within community nonprofit organizations for skill and personal development. During 2003–2005, a pilot community service program was implemented in nine school districts throughout the state of North Carolina. This article provides a comprehensive review of that project. Promising results from this initiative emphasize the significance of community service and public school collaborations in assisting youth to stay in school and become productive citizens.

Out-of-school suspension has been nationally identified as a common and widely used method of discipline with problem students (Dupper, 1994). According to Mendez and Knoff (2003), millions of students in the United States experience a suspension in any given year. Excluding students from attending school is a frequently mandated consequence based on zero-tolerance policies and associated with a variety of negative behaviors. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (2003), school administrators use suspension and expulsion in an effort to prevent violence and criminal acts on school grounds, as well as deal with the less dangerous and more common acts, such as truancy. Long-term suspension is a widespread form of disciplinary action, often implemented with any behaviors deemed unacceptable or potentially problematic. Unfortunately, this means that in states with large numbers of students considered “at risk,” exhibiting behavioral problems such as disobedience and disrespect frequently results in suspensions. Note that African American males are suspended at a statistically disproportionate rate and that southern states tend to have high rates of suspension, in comparison to the rest of the country (Fuentes, 2003). Suspension data from North Carolina provide an example of a disturbing and growing concern regarding suspension. For the 2001–2002 academic year, there were 3,459 statewide long-term suspensions consisting of 11 or more days. These involved 3,318 students with a total of 236,527 instructional days lost from school (North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2003). During 2002–2003, long-term suspensions increased by 15%.

See All Chapters

School, Community Leadership, and Election Structure

ePub

ANN ALLEN

ABSTRACT: This article examines how the political structure of school elections contributes to leadership perspectives related to school– community engagement. Interview data from school superintendents, school board presidents, and city mayors across four cities and two election types were analyzed to determine if differences in school election structure are reflected in leadership perspectives. A leadership typology of professional, political, and engagement decision making was used in the analysis. Data indicate that stronger school–community relationships exist where the politics of the election process has not been minimized. Findings have implications for educational policy relating to public school governance.

The school–community relationship is vital to the success of public schooling. Some argue that the political mobilization of entire communities is necessary to bridge gaps that prevent all students from achieving high-quality education (C. N. Stone, Henig, Jones, & Pierannunzi, 2001). Others argue for strong community–school relationships to preserve the democratic nature of public school governance—in part for protection against sudden political upheavals that derail school leaders and their policies (Lutz & Merz, 1992). Still others note that the link between the school and the public needs to be strong to ensure that the common-good aims of public schooling remain a vital part of the public school agenda (Gutmann, 1987; Plank & Boyd, 1994; Tyack, 2003) and that the perspective and needs of minority groups are not overlooked (Katz, 1975).

See All Chapters

Change Orientations: The Effects of Organizational Climate on Principal, Teacher, and Community Transformation

ePub

PAGE A. SMITH

SEAN A. MAIKA

ABSTRACT: This research investigates the openness that teachers and principals have to change—specifically, the openness of the faculty to community pressure for change. Three dimensions of change are examined (teacher, principal, and community), as well as four aspects of organizational climate (institutional vulnerability, collegial leadership, professional teacher behavior, and achievement press). In general, the better the school’s organizational climate, the more receptive stakeholders are to change. However, different dimensions of climate are more or less important in affecting the aspects of change. Two simple and parsimonious research instruments were designed to measure salient organizational characteristics and are detailed here. Finally, implications for further research and practical implications are discussed.

School leaders face an ever-changing landscape of educational reforms at local, state, and national levels (Bruno, 2000; Bulach, 2001). To remain relevant, schools must change to accommodate a myriad of environmental forces (Fullan, 1994, 1995, 2002). In spite of the fact that our current educational system is ailing, educators often balk at change (Valenzuela, 2005). Indeed, principals and teachers are not exceptions; they often view any change to the status quo as a threat to their security (Goodson, 2001; Hargreaves, 2005).

See All Chapters

Organizational Codes of Ethics: Why So Difficult to Enforce?

ePub

MICHAEL JINKS

JAMES BOWMAN

ABSTRACT: Many professional organizations exist within the broad field of education. Membership in these organizations is not particularly selective, with qualifications being tied primarily to job status and title; as such, membership is often taken for granted. Yet members and the general public expect these organizations to have formally adopted codes of ethics that describe desirable and unacceptable standards of behavior. Violations of the codes are often ignored. Given the intense media coverage and public image issues, why is enforcement of the codes so problematic? Organizations ultimately control membership rolls—thus, does membership status have any substantive value?

Many professional organizations exist within the broad field of education. Both the membership and the general public expect each organization to have a formally adopted code of ethics. These codes are commonly the result of many hours of sincere work by an advisory committee, and they are typically about one page in length. The codes are often given to new members in a format suitable for framing, and they can be found on the walls of countless offices across the country. As organizations prepare their respective codes of ethics, they generally focus their attention on the litany of statements describing desirable, expected, and prohibited behaviors.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061737
Isbn
9781475823943
File size
574 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata