Medium 9781475824223

Jspr Vol 32-N4

Views: 490
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Public Relations is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies and descriptions of best practices in six critical areas of school administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management. Practitioners, policymakers, consultants and professors rely on the Journal for cutting-edge ideas and current knowledge. Articles are a blend of research and practice addressing contemporary issues ranging from passing bond referenda to building support for school programs to integrating modern information.

List price: $19.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Notes From the Editors. Introduction to Special Issue: International Perspectives on School–Parent Relations

ePub

LARS G. BJÖRK
TRICIA BROWNE-FERRIGNO

This special issue is devoted to the work of international scholars who have studied the dynamics of centralization and decentralization of education policymaking as well as parent involvement in school governance. These international comparative studies provide insight into the deep sense of responsibility that parents have for their children’s education and the political structures ostensibly created to enhance their decision-making processes and school engagement activities. Taken as a whole, these articles are highly relevant to our understanding of national educational reform movements in the United States and other countries. As guest editors of this special issue, we are indebted to Ted Kowalski and the editorial team of the Journal of School Public Relations for supporting this international endeavor. They joined us and the external reviewers in ensuring that the articles were subjected to multiple blind peer reviews and held to the rigorous criteria set by the journal. Due to space limitations, the editorial team decided to release seven articles in two sequential issues. The present issue contains the first four articles accepted for publication; the subsequent issue will contain the remaining three.

See All Chapters

Educational Reform in South Africa: Decentralization and Parent Engagement

ePub

RIKA JOUBERT
JEAN W. VAN ROOYEN

ABSTRACT: The promulgation of the South African Schools Act in 1996 was a critical moment in the process of making a compromise between a centralized and a decentralized system. The act describes the establishment, membership, and responsibilities of school governing bodies as the vehicle for parental engagement and decision making. The article touches on five crucial assumptions that underpin the efficacy of the worldwide movement toward decentralized cooperative governance for schools, before proceeding to discuss two mandatory functions of South African school governing bodies—namely, those relating to policy matters and financial matters.

C onstitutional imperatives and transformational demands have placed huge responsibilities on the South African government and education departments to transform education and establish a democratic education system based on the recognition and fulfillment of human rights, particularly education rights, and the provisioning of quality education to all learners. Transformation on this scale is slow, pervasive, and ongoing: It happens at all levels of society, in all institutions, and among people—and it affects the lives of all people, influencing their mind-sets and attitudes. Thus, to give effect to transformation demands in education, public schools in postapartheid South Africa have been transformed into democratic institutions where principles of representation, participation, openness, and accountability are paramount in the quest for the realization of the best interests of the school and all its learners. It is against this background—and the demands and obligations placed on public schools to practice democratic school management and governance—that this article has been written.

See All Chapters

Parent Involvement in Public School Governance: The United States and South Africa

ePub

WAYNE D. LEWIS
PAUL COLDITZ
TRICIA BROWNE-FERRIGNO

ABSTRACT: This article explores parent involvement in decision making in the United States and in postapartheid South Africa and highlights similarities and differences in how parents in these two countries participate in public school governance and decision making. Parents’ role in public school governance in South Africa is significant and entrenched in the country’s South African Schools Act of 1996. In contrast, parent participation in U.S. school governance and meaningful school-level decision making is more limited. The article concludes with a discussion of challenges, progress, and lessons learned in both countries.

Few individuals disagree that parental involvement is beneficial to student learning. As an example, partnerships between schools and families have the potential to improve children’s educational outcomes (Sheldon & Epstein, 2002, 2005). Furthermore, educational research findings from the United States and other countries support the notion that parents’ involvement in schools and with their children’s education generally has a positive effect on student learning, eliminates gaps in student achievement, and contributes to the overall social, emotional, and educational well-being of children (Barnard, 2004; Dearing, McCartney, Weiss, Kreider, & Simpkins, 2004; Lopez, Scribner, & Mahitivanichcha, 2001).

See All Chapters

Parent Participation in School Governance: A Legal Analysis of Experiences in South Africa and Kentucky

ePub

JUSTIN BATHON
JOHAN BECKMANN
LARS G. BJÖRK

ABSTRACT: This comparative study on the educational governance systems of South Africa and the Commonwealth of Kentucky examines legal evidence from judicial decisions and administrative law to understand similarities in how school-based governance structures have been developed. We found that although school-level governance structures may provide greater opportunities for community and parental participation, each engenders a number of legal problems that compromise the decentralization of democracy to the school level. Recommendations for policymakers and practitioners are offered that may achieve this goal.

Education is an important social function that consciously weaves together responsibilities of the state, the community, and the family. Most nations engaged in systemic education reform are challenged by the need to balance countervailing forces for centralization that advances the broad interests of the state and for decentralization that gives greater voice to communities and protects individual legal rights of parents. Although education reform is a global phenomenon in the 21st century (Björk & Alsbury, 2011), many countries find devolving authority to the local school level and installing representative democratic bodies problematic. Understanding the legal complexities of enacting educational representative democracy in the Republic of South Africa and the Commonwealth of Kentucky—both viewed as reform states—is the focus of this cross-national comparative study. This article provides a discussion of the history of educational reform with attention to the devolution of governance in each state, as well as an examination of evidence from legislation, judicial decisions, and administrative regulations that illustrate unique legal complexities as well as similarities encountered by each state in enacting school-based governance structures. An analysis of legal implications of the school-based governance provides a basis for offering recommendations to policymakers and practitioners who are considering a school-based approach to governance.

See All Chapters

Parent–School Councils in Beijing, China

ePub

WAYNE D. LEWIS
LARS G. BJÖRK
YURU ZHAO
BIN CHI

ABSTRACT: This exploratory study examines how schools in Beijing have responded to a Chinese national policy mandate to establish and maintain parent councils. We surveyed principals and parent council members across schools in the Beijing municipality about the establishment and functions of their schools’ parent councils. Survey results provide insights into who comprises parent councils in Beijing schools, what parent councils’ primary functions have been, how parent council members and principals perceive the value of parent councils, and the working relationships between parent councils and school principals.

Since the 1950s, Chinese education leaders have acknowledged the importance of school–parent relationships and the roles that parents play in supporting their children’s education. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, schools experimented with various approaches to incorporating families into the work of schools; however, parent councils recently caught the interest of education leaders in China. The adoption of the Elementary Administration Regulation, issued by the National Education Committee of the People’s Republic of China (1996), encouraged schools to establish parent councils. The intent of these councils was to help families better understand and contribute to solving school-level problems, as well as assist schools with gauging parent opinions on certain matters. Several years later, national education leaders released the report Some Suggestions on Strengthening the Running of Schools According to Law (Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China, 2003), which encourages schools to consider the opinions of parent councils when making decisions about students’ rights. Most recently, the National Outline for Medium-to-Long-Term Education Reform and Development (Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China, 2010) required parent councils to be established in every elementary and secondary school in China. While the aforementioned policies refer only to school-level parent councils, Chinese schools have responded to these policies by establishing parent councils at the classroom, grade, and school levels.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061741
Isbn
9781475824223
File size
372 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata