Medium 9781475823868

Jspr Vol 27-N3

Views: 988
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Public Relations is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies and descriptions of best practices in six critical areas of school administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management. Practitioners, policymakers, consultants and professors rely on the Journal for cutting-edge ideas and current knowledge. Articles are a blend of research and practice addressing contemporary issues ranging from passing bond referenda to building support for school programs to integrating modern information.

List price: $20.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Notes From the Editor

ePub

THERODORE J.KOWALSKI

The need for school personnel to communicate effectively with parents is greater today than at any point in the past. This is in part attributed to technology, which makes it possible to exchange information rapidly and continually. Even so, relational communication is often thwarted by social and cultural barriers—obstacles that have become common in a society that has become increasingly diverse.

This issue includes insightful research articles that help us to understand why it is sometimes difficult for administrators and teachers to communicate with parents. In the first article, Cheryl Fields-Smith, from the University of Georgia, examines the reasons why African American parents elect to participate in their children’s education. Her research addresses how age and socioeconomic factors may influence parental behavior in relation to their taking an active role in schooling.

The second article, by Susan Stratton from State University of New York College at Cortland, focuses on democratic dialogue between Spanish-speaking parents and English-speaking educators. Findings indicate that explicit training in group participation on democratic dialogue had a positive effect on parents and on communication that followed the training.

See All Chapters

Motivation for Participation: Why Highly Involved African American Parents Participate in Their Children’s Education

ePub

CHERYL FIELDS-SMITH

ABSTRACT: Given the persistence of an achievement gap between White and Black students and the positive association between parental involvement and student achievement, a greater understanding of factors that influence Black parents to participate in their children’s education is warranted. Using a qualitative methodology, this study investigated factors that contributed to such involvement, as reported by 22 Black parents. Although a majority of the parents exhibited beliefs and practices representative of a high level of parent self-efficacy, the results suggest that age and socioeconomic status influence parental motivations to participate in their children’s education.

Two facts frame the need to investigate the involvement of African American parents in their children’s education. First, the achievement gap between White and Black students persists (Perie, Moran, & Lutkus, 2005); second, there is a positive association between parental involvement and student achievement (Stein & Thorkildsen, 1999). School personnel have often attributed the failure of Black students to a lack of parental involvement, despite the fact that historical evidence indicates Black parents have fervently pursued education in the past (see Anderson, 1988; Cecelski, 1994; Gadsden & Wagner, 1995; Irvine & Irvine, 1983;Jones, 1978; Lightfoot, 1978; Morris, 1999; Walker, 1996). Several studies have actually found that Black parents were often more involved in their children’s education than were other parents (Chavkin & Williams, 1993; Kerbow & Bernhardt, 1993).

See All Chapters

Esperanza y Poder: Democratic Dialogue and Authentic Parent Involvement

ePub

SUSAN STRATTON

ABSTRACT: This study explored ways to increase authentic participation of Mexican American parents in the education of their children. It focused on direct dialogue between Spanish-speaking parents and English-speaking school personnel and how dialogue facilitated group development. The design of the study included phenomenological inquiry and action research. Two key findings of the study were as follows: One, parents reported that explicit training in group participation through democratic dialogue was critical to their understanding of participation. Two, use of the dialogue approach played an important role for all participants, particularly, the parents, as illustrated through their reported transformations.

Problems facing the education of immigrant children from Mexico is well documented (Crosnoe, 2005; Suárez-Orozco & Suárez-Orozco, 2001; Valenzuela, 1999). For the school-age immigrant children, achievement scores are low, and dropout rates are high (Cummins, 1986; Gibson & Ogbu, 1991; Valenzuela, 1999). Efforts to improve achievement scores and increase the rate of retaining students in school for immigrant children include practices such as English-as-a-second-language (ESL) classes and bilingual education classes. Further, parents’ involvement in their children’s education is considered important in determining the success of children in school (Apple, 1989; Bronfenbrenner, 1978; Cummins, 1986; Delgado-Gaitan, 1990; Epstein, 1987; Lightfoot, 1978; Trueba, Rodriguez, Zou, & Cintrón, 1990; Zeichner, 1992). However, because of linguistic, educational, and cultural differences between the parents and the school staff (in general, staff are monolingual English speakers), opportunities for parent participation are limited. This configuration of immigration and the realities of public school education provide an interesting forum upon which the issues of power, decision making, and participation are played out.

See All Chapters

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: Implications for Education and Communication

ePub

LAURA DELONG

ABSTRACT: Current statistics reveal a dramatic increase in households where grandparents are raising their grandchildren. Issues facing these families affect learning outcomes for the grandchildren; therefore, there are diverse implications for schools in dealing with grandparent-headed households. Schools can address areas of communication in grandparent outreach, staff awareness, academic concerns, legal policies, financial concerns, emotional support, physical health issues, and community resources. This article provides an overview of the trend and the ways in which school districts can support the members of grandparent-headed households.

Families of the 21st century are composed of a variety of configurations that go far beyond the traditional nuclear family of the 1950s. At the very least, these new family constellations require school leaders to assess the ways that they communicate with families and, at most, to adopt new ways of doing so. Because the family–school partnership can be vital to students’ learning, effectively communicating across this partnership is one of the most important obligations of educators.

See All Chapters

Serving the Needs of At-Risk Refugee Youth: A Program Evaluation

ePub

J. LYNN MCBRIEN

ABSTRACT: Refugee students, although frequently subsumed under the “immigrant” heading, often suffer from effects of significant trauma that can make them more vulnerable than children of voluntary immigrant families. This study evaluated a program created specifically for refugee youth at-risk for academic failure and “social death.” The program goals included the creation of a refugee–school–community services coalition designed to deliver culturally appropriate services for a diverse population of refugees. Using mixed methods, I found that the program resulted in positive change in the attitudes and behaviors of the refugee participants and in community social service providers.

Because refugee children account for so small a percentage of the U.S. school-age population (approximately 500,000 refugees of any age have been admitted to the United States in the past 10 years), there is a dearth of research that specifically addresses their needs. Much of the literature on refugee children in the United States includes this population in discussions on immigrant children (Allen, 2002; Cheng, 1998; Delgado, Jones, & Rohani, 2005; Gitlin, Buendia, Crosland, & Doumbia, 2003; Hones, 2002; Olsen, 2000; Portes & Rumbaut, 2001).

See All Chapters

The Hidden Advantages of Focus Group Interviews in Educational Research

ePub

LISA M. SHOAF AND MICHAEL G. SHOAF

ABSTRACT: In the field of education, success of a school system has traditionally been determined through quantitative methods, such as through scores on achievement tests and survey results. In short, the quantitative method can determine if a school is failing or not. However, it does not answer the question of why a school is failing, a particularly important question for school administrators who hope to make positive changes in their districts. Focus group research, or qualitative analysis, is an underutilized method for gathering data in schools. Focus group methodology offers a more in-depth understanding of participants’ perceptions than do quantitative measures such as test scores and surveys, thereby providing potential answers to why a school is failing. The purpose of this article is threefold. First, it attempts to define focus group research in the field of education. Second, it presents the disadvantages and advantages of focus group research, and finally, it provides methodological guidance to administrators who are interested in using focus group research as a way to gather information about the performance of a school system.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061727
Isbn
9781475823868
File size
591 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata