Medium 9781475823844

Jspr Vol 27-N1

Views: 992
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Public Relations is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies and descriptions of best practices in six critical areas of school administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management. Practitioners, policymakers, consultants and professors rely on the Journal for cutting-edge ideas and current knowledge. Articles are a blend of research and practice addressing contemporary issues ranging from passing bond referenda to building support for school programs to integrating modern information.

List price: $20.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Notes From the Editor

ePub

THEODORE J. KOWALSKI

A review of current literature and national conferences reveals that school public relations and communication are receiving increasing levels of interest from researchers and practitioners. In large measure, the added attention is attributable to what we have learned over the past 2 decades in trying to improve schools. For example, we have discovered that inclusiveness and collaboration enhance the probability of meaningful change. Unless relevant publics are involved in building a vision and in developing a plan to reach it, resistance to new ideas is usually substantial. Public relations and communication are integral to working with various stakeholders because critical tasks associated with school reform are communication-intensive activities; they require educators, especially administrators, to exchange information openly, candidly, and continuously.

The Journal of School Public Relations is dedicated to publishing research and effective-practice articles that pertain to public relations, communication, community relations, community education, and conflict resolution. Ideally, it is a catalyst for additional inquiry that will broaden the knowledge base in educational administration.

See All Chapters

Predictors of Parents’ Inclusion Decisions

ePub

ERIK J. PORFELI, BOB ALGOZZINE, BOEN NUTTING, AND J. ALLEN QUEEN

ABSTRACT: Helping children with disabilities has become a part of American education with varying degrees of acceptance and tolerance over the years, and efforts to provide special education have become controversial. Much of the concern is about paying for “extra” services, but the debate is not just about money. Many professionals question the benefits of special education, and the practice of educating children with disabilities in general education classrooms (i.e., inclusion) has recently received increased attention. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of parents toward inclusion and to identify predictors of their opinions about important effects of the practice. Parents of children attending a suburban school district in the Piedmont region of North Carolina participated in the study. In general, parents were opposed to including children with disabilities in general education classrooms, and they did not believe that inclusion would greatly improve academic achievement of children with disabilities or greatly hinder performance of children without disabilities. We discuss the findings with regard to other studies of parent attitudes toward special education as a basis for continued study of the most effective means of promoting an awareness of the benefits and potential limitations of special education.

See All Chapters

Keeping Scores: Audited Self-Monitoring of High-Stakes Testing Environments

ePub

RAYMOND V. PADILLA AND MICHAEL G. RICHARDS

ABSTRACT: To address a public relations problem faced by a large urban public school district in Texas, we conducted action research that resulted in an audited self-monitoring system for high-stakes testing environments. The system monitors violations of testing protocols while identifying and disseminating best practices to improve the education of students in the district. The system provides the district with a systematic and empirically based means of answering media and other public allegation of wrongdoing. We employ a series of concept models to describe the process of developing the monitoring system. We also discuss implications for social justice.

In January 2005, the Dallas Morning News ran a story on the latest results of high-stakes testing in Texas, based on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). The story accused Texas public school teachers of helping students cheat on the TAKS. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) had compiled the results of the first 2 years of TAKS testing and made them public in such a way that the columnists could easily establish a ranking system and visually identify schools that had improved dramatically from one year (2003) to the next (2004). The accusation was aimed at those schools that had, in the eyes of the journalists, made “impossible” progress from one year to the next. Two elementary schools in a large urban independent school district in south Texas (hereafter referred to as the district) were among those implicated in the article. Local journalists took up the story, and soon south Texas columnists were writing of the incident as if it were indisputable truth.

See All Chapters

High School Students’ Perspectives on the Role of Parents in School Improvement

ePub

BONNIE L. STELMACH

ABSTRACT:Parent involvement literature rarely considers students’ perspectives. Based on individual interviews with 14 diverse Grade 10–12 students from a rural secondary school in northern Alberta, Canada, this qualitative case study documents students’ perspectives on the appropriate role for parents in school improvement targeting academic achievement. Using interpretive policy analysis, the data suggest that students aligned with provincial policy definitions of school improvement as measurable outcomes, but they denied parents a strong role regarding their achievement. These students expected “support,” typologized as social support, curriculum support, support through intervention, and support through awareness of school-related issues. Academic standing seemed an influential factor.

Parent involvement has become an orthodoxy in current school improvement discourse (Hopkins, 2001). The impetus for emphasizing parent involvement is a composite of trends, including rigorous public accountability, administrative restructuring for site-based decision making, and responsiveness to market-based pressures and policies (Young & Levin, 2002). Furthermore, links between students’ academic performance and parents’ participation in their children’s schooling are constantly reinforced in the literature (Epstein, 2001; Henderson & Mapp, 2002). The centralization of parents in school improvement, however, has achieved momentum through the assumption that parent involvement holds constant and consonant meaning for all educational constituents, including teachers, parents, and students.

See All Chapters

Changing Ties: Charter Schools Redefine the School-Community Connection

ePub

ANN ALLEN

ABSTRACT:Until recently, charter schools have served a small percentage of public school students in any given community, but that is changing. Recent data indicate that the market share of public school students enrolled in charter schools is climbing. The growth of the charter school movement behooves us to consider how such a change in the educational landscape of our communities will affect the way schools and communities interact. This article presents findings from a qualitative study of the relationship between the public and a public charter school in one urban community in Michigan. Policy implications are discussed.

The school–community relationship has taken some dramatic turns over the past 100 years. These turns have often been driven by changes in school governance policy that have attempted to depoliticize public schooling. For example, the consolidation of school committees into district school boards reduced the number of citizen representatives on school governance bodies (Tyack, 1974), and the creation of special school elections in the 1920s effectively reduced the number of citizens who vote on school issues by more than half and created an election system that was quiet, untimely, and controllable (Lutz & Iannacone, 1978). Although some scholars have argued that the efforts to depoliticize public schooling over the years have weakened the representative nature of the school–community relationship, Lutz and Merz (1992) suggest that the democratic nature of school governance is still strong enough to protect community interests. That might not be the case in public charter schools, where policies provide more autonomy from the community, relieving public charter schools from direct obligations to the electorate and, in some cases, any public authority.1 The question that this article addresses is how such a shift to autonomous schools affects the democratic nature of the school–community relationship and, more broadly, the role of public schools in communities.2

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061728
Isbn
9781475823844
File size
1.27 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata