Medium 9781475823721

Jspr Vol 24-N1

Views: 1093
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Public Relations is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies and descriptions of best practices in six critical areas of school administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management. Practitioners, policymakers, consultants and professors rely on the Journal for cutting-edge ideas and current knowledge. Articles are a blend of research and practice addressing contemporary issues ranging from passing bond referenda to building support for school programs to integrating modern information.

List price: $20.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Notes From the Editor

ePub

THEODORE J. KOWALSKI

Recently, the National School Public Relations Association revised its standards for educational public relations and communication specialists. The standards were presented in an article published in Volume 23, No. 3 of the Journal. The following issue (No. 4) includes an article with reactions from this publication’s editorial board members. The third and final article related to the standards appears in this issue. Written by Marsha Chappelow, assistant superintendent for Communication Services in Overland, Kansas, it presents practitioner perspectives and reactions to the standards.

The second article in this issue includes practical suggestions for structuring meetings. The authors, Professors William Purkey and Paula Stanley, offer useful tips that can be employed by administrators and public relations specialists to make their group work sessions more effective.

Professor Doug Newsom is one of the leading authorities on public relations in the United States. His article examines negative opinions of public education and provides thoughts about the causes of these opinions. Using the deployment of public relations in business as an example, he demonstrates how the modern concept of public relations is substantially different from the traditional concept of community relations. He argues that communicating uniformly with all relevant publics is an essential step in reducing negative opinions.

See All Chapters

Standards for Educational Public Relations and Communications Professionals

ePub

MARSHA A. CHAPPELOW

This article deals with public education leaders’ and practitioners’ reactions to the revised standards adopted by the National School Public Relations Association. They were presented in an earlier article published in Volume 23, No. 3 of the Journal.

1. Standards for Educational Public Relations and Communications Professionals: These standards are provided as a guide for governing board members, chief executive officers, and officials of other educational organizations as they consider employing individuals to direct a communications program. These standards will assist university administrators and officials in state departments of education as they determine the necessary training requirements to become a certified school administrator. These standards will orient potential school communication practitioners as to the scope of responsibilities that professionals are expected to meet.

2. Educational Public Relations Program Assessment: These standards enable governing board members, chief executive officers, and public relations practitioners to work toward achieving criteria that the National School Public Relations Association believes are components of a comprehensive school district public relations and communications program.

See All Chapters

How to Create the Best Meeting Ever: 40 Brass Tack Suggestions

ePub

WILLIAM WATSON PURKEY
PAULA HELEN STANLEY

ABSTRACT: Forty suggestions about how to create the best conference and in-service programs are described. They are organized so that they provide ideas for how to plan months, weeks, days, and minutes before a meeting. The article also includes what to do immediately after a meeting.

We all have attended conferences and in-service programs where everything went beautifully, surpassing the fondest hopes of those who planned and directed them. We have also attended programs that were disappointing.

This article offers 40 practical suggestions on how to organize the best meeting ever. Not all of the suggestions listed here will fit all situations. However, a careful review and implementation of these suggestions will enrich any program. For further suggestions, see Becoming an Invitational Leader (Purkey & Siegel, 2003).

1. Get people involved. From the beginning make sure it is “our” program. Organize subcommittees for publicity, refreshments, greetings, registration, name tags (with first names in BIG LETTERS), decorations, and other tasks. Give subcommittees leadership responsibilities, as opposed to “dog work,” and encourage them to contribute ideas.

See All Chapters

When “Community Relations” Won’t Cut It: PR for Public Schools

ePub

DOUG NEWSOM

ABSTRACT: The nation’s view of our public schools has been basically negative for some time. One factor contributing to this condition has been the failure of school officials to communicate appropriately with all relevant publics. In many school districts, administrators have not adjusted to life in an information-based society; they continue to embrace a narrow concept of community relations that leads them to disseminate information primarily to parents, school employees, and students. The modern practice of public relations, on the other hand, is viewed as an essential management function ensuring open, two-way communication between an organization and its external and internal publics. This concept is advocated as a strategy for improving the image and effectiveness of public schools.

The nation’s view of our public schools, formally a basis of national pride, now is basically negative and has been for some time. Newspaper headlines are revealing: “Study: Tarrant Dropout Rate 40%” (Acosta, 2002); “Why Our Schools Are Failing” (Metro Desk, 1998); “Education Pivotal in Florida Election, Failing Schools’ New Plans Shape Governor’s Race” (Leonard, 2002); “New Window on a Scandal in the Schools (Tierney, 2001). From Texas to California to Florida to New York, public school systems are getting bad publicity, and it’s continuing in both mass and specialized media (Rose & Gallup, 2001; Hoffman & Hudson, 1991).

See All Chapters

Stop Talking and Do Something: The Changing Role of Superintendent Involvement in School–Community Relations

ePub

THOMAS ALSBURY

ABSTRACT: This reflective piece reviews what current literature says about the role of the superintendent in school–community relations and provides a critique and recommendations from an experienced administrator’s perspective. The article suggests that the traditional superintendent role in community relations assumes the presence of a power elite, which is being replaced by a more dispersed and disconnected public. Recommendations for superintendents include focusing on the use of technology to reach more stakeholders; training, resources, and time to allow staff to function as key community relations representatives; and relying on school successes to be communicated naturally through satisfied students and parents.

The school superintendent has long been recognized as the person mostly responsible for gathering and disseminating information to influential school district individuals and groups. Kindred (as cited in Lober, 1993) said, “in reality, superintendents are cast by circumstances into the role of educational statesmen and must spend much of their time dealing with individuals and groups whose influence and power help to shape the quality of educational opportunity in the community” (p. 19). Within Kindred’s assertion are two seminal ideas: the importance of the superintendent as the primary messenger to the community and the necessity of the superintendent to identify and gain support from key individuals or groups from within the community. However, some researchers have recognized that community changes may be resulting in a need to modify the superintendent’s traditional community relations role (Bagin & Gallagher, 2001; Caloss, 1999; Fiore, 2002; Wadsworth, 1997). Demographic and political changes in many communities diminish the effectiveness of just communicating with key individuals or elite power groups.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061717
Isbn
9781475823721
File size
304 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata