Medium 9781475823714

Jspr Vol 23-N4

Views: 994
Ratings: (0)
The Journal of School Public Relations is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies and descriptions of best practices in six critical areas of school administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management. Practitioners, policymakers, consultants and professors rely on the Journal for cutting-edge ideas and current knowledge. Articles are a blend of research and practice addressing contemporary issues ranging from passing bond referenda to building support for school programs to integrating modern information.

List price: $20.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Notes From the Editor

ePub

THEODORE J. KOWALSKI

The Journal staff welcomes Brian Woodland as the newest member of the Editorial Review Board. Brian is director of communication services for the Peel District School Board in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. He has extensive experience working with school districts across Canada and United States.

The first two articles in this issue address a pervasive concern for many school board members and administrators— passing a school funding referendum. The first one is authored by Glenn Graham and Gordon Wise from Wright State University. They have extensive experience providing consulting services to school officials and are the cofounders of the Center for School Tax Levies and Bond Issues. Glenn is professor of educational administration and Gordon is professor emeritus of marketing. They share their insights on how to avoid fatal mistakes in planning and executing a funding campaign.

Susan Copeland, director of the University of Memphis Campus School, authored the second article. Her focus is the development and use of public opinion surveys. A doctoral student at the University of Memphis, Susan has been working under the tutelage of Professor Thomas Glass, a noted authority on public opinion surveys.

See All Chapters

Avoiding Fatal Flaws in Planning and Executing School Funding Campaigns

ePub

GLENN T. GRAHAM AND GORDON L. WISE

ABSTRACT: Observations over 25 years of experience in working with public schools on bond and levy campaigns have led us to conclude that there are at least 13 fatal flaws that school/campaign leadership make that can result in disaster at the polls. Each mistake is discussed and ways to correct it are provided.

The time we usually get called by a school district is after a bond or levy has failed for the second or third time, and in some cases even more often. The plea for assistance is accompanied by such comments as, “We just don’t understand what went wrong”; “We thought it would pass”; “We need this to pass—how do we convince the community?” Having worked with over 60 Ohio school districts in the past 25 years, conducting community surveys, focus groups, and consulting to campaigns, we have observed 13 fatal flaws that we have characterized as potentially deadly to a campaign. We will discuss each of these and offer correctives that are battle-tested and proven successful.

See All Chapters

Use of Public Opinion Surveys

ePub

SUSAN COPELAND

ABSTRACT: Public opinion surveys serve two primary functions. They gauge public support for tax levies or proposed budgets, and they gather data to determine public support for a wide range of school issues. There are several types of public opinion surveys, each with unique features and datagathering opportunities. It is important to determine the purpose of the survey when choosing the type, as surveys not only gather information, they have the potential of shaping public opinion. School districts that regularly survey their constituents have greater success in voter issues, higher student achievement, and more stable leadership.

In recent years, more and more districts have been using public opinion surveys in the planning processes to bring about improved student achievement ( Phi Delta Kappa , 1999). Historically, public opinion surveys have been used for several purposes. The foremost use has been prior to the setting of tax levies or putting a proposed district budget before the public. Second, they have been used to obtain public feedback regarding issues such as school closings, open versus closed campuses, educational or extracurricular program cuts to meet budget shortfalls, or how to meet state requirements for school accountability.

See All Chapters

Community Education: A Status Report and Projections for the Future

ePub

LARRY E. DECKER

ABSTRACT: The good news is that comprehensive and proactive educational initiatives like community education and full-service schools are making a difference in establishing meaningful home, school, and community partnerships. The schools that have comprehensive outreach efforts to meet diverse needs almost always have high levels of community support.

The bad news is that there are far too few of these initiatives and the large number of households in any community who do not have children often have little or no contact with public schools. They do not understand the challenges faced by schools and are not motivated to support public education. Without an understanding of these challenges, many people interpret the media attention and the political agenda for educational accountability and high-stakes testing as further evidence supporting a lack of confidence in public schools.

Many Americans worry about what they see as a growing gulf between the American public and its public schools. Troubling trends seem to indicate a fraying relationship among families, schools, and communities (Decker & Decker, 2003):

See All Chapters

Reactions to the New Standards for School Public Relations Specialists

ePub

THEODORE J. KOWALSKI

ABSTRACT: Recently, a committee under the auspices of the National School Public Relations Association issues new standards for school public relations specialists. This article reports a discussion among selected editorial board members from the Journal of School Public Relations. The discussants supported the effort to establish such standards and applauded the authors for their work. However, certain perceived deficiencies and concerns were identified. The overall purpose of the discussion was to contribute to a national discourse on the standards.

An article in the previous issue of the Journal presented the new standards for public relations practice developed by the National School Public Relations Association (NSPRA). They were unveiled this fall at NSPRA’s 49th annual seminar and are a continuing refinement of documents first produced by this organization in 1970. The standards are divided into three groups: professional, program, and program budget.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061713
Isbn
9781475823714
File size
142 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata