Medium 9781442267701

Collections Vol 5 N3

Views: 1067
Ratings: (0)

"Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals" is a multi-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the discussion of all aspects of handling, preserving, researching, and organizing collections. Curators, archivists, collections managers, preparators, registrars, educators, students, and others contribute.

List price: $23.00

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

A Letter from the Editor

ePub

This issue of Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archive Professionals questions the practice of museums and offers guidance as to the care of their collections. These are areas of inquiry that are, certainly, part and parcel of our disciplines, and yet, they still manage to wage discomfort, uncertainty, and difficulty. And, while significant contributions have been made, over time, to our modern understanding of how to define and care for a collection, other forms of repositories, methodologies of display, and recontextualizations have enriched the milieu of “collections” conceptually and materially. The essays and reviews herewith critically evaluate the making and meaning of “collections” in terms addressing a range of activities and practices, making notice of efficiency of collections handling, acknowledging what is on view and what is kept from display, and noting provenance and provenience (or lack thereof).

To begin, Bobby Marlin and Mikaela Selley outline a new, expedited approach used by the University of Houston Libraries to process a manuscript collection. Christina Kahrl Brody addresses the issues faced in the publication and exhibition of unprovenienced collections in museums. Tunde Akinwumi and Obododimma Oha call into question the long-range significance of bridal fabrics that, once worn, are often stored away, despite cultural and semiotic richness. Lanfranco Aceti interrogates issues related to the preservation, exhibition, and storage of immaterial art forms, particularly digital and new media practices.

See All Chapters

Students Making Access a Priority

ePub

Robert O. Marlin IV and Mikaela Selley

Robert O. Marlin IV, Library Supervisor, Special Collections Department, University of Houston Libraries, 114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000, phone: (713) 743-9743; fax: (713) 743-9893; email: rmarlin@uh.edu

Mikaela Selley, Student Research Assistant, Special Collections Department, University of Houston Libraries, 114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000, phone: (713) 743-9750; email: mikaela-gs@att.net

Abstract    This paper outlines a new approach used by the University of Houston Libraries to process a major manuscript collection. This method enabled the department to reduce the completion time by twenty-two months in addition to reducing the labor cost from $246.86 to only $8.23 per linear foot.1 While many archivists using this method employ the term “Minimal Processing” or “The Golden Minimum,” the student processors decided against using these terms because they felt that “minimum” carried a slightly negative connotation. So, they proposed a new one, “Express Processing.” Whatever the term, this method allowed the Special Collections Department at the University of Houston Libraries to provide more primary source material to researchers in one year than in the previous seven years combined.

See All Chapters

Studying the Skeletons in the Closet: Unprovenienced Archeological Collections in Museums

ePub

Christina Kahrl Brody

Assistant Registrar, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 151 Third Street, San Francisco, CA, 94103, phone: 415–357–2872;fax: 415–357–4109; email: cbrody@sfmoma.org

Abstract  Unprovenienced archaeological collections present a unique set of opportunities and challenges for museums. These collections are often from stolen, illegally excavated and/or illicitly transported sources, but can also be the result of improper recording, housing, and handling. Recent trends have relegated unprovenienced archaeological museum collections to storage, neither researched nor exhibited, because of their questionable source and perceived liabilities. The educational value of these types of collections warrants a closer look at the potential benefits and detriments of unprovenienced archaeological collections. This paper discusses the nature of unprovenienced archaeological collections in museums. It recognizes the challenges of researching unprovenienced archaeological collections and presents a framework through which these collections may be recontextualized. Demonstrating the type of information that can be learned about unprovenienced archaeological collections, this paper notes the issues faced in the publication and exhibition of these collections in museums.

See All Chapters

A Nineteenth-century Shao Bridal Fabric Art as a Metaphor for Starting a Successful Marital Life Journey

ePub

Tunde M. Akinwumi and Obododimma Oha

Dr. Tunde M. Akinwumi, Associate Professor, African Textile and Clothing History, Department Of Home Science, University Of Agriculture, Abeoku ta, NIGERIA phone: +234 803 308 5822; email: tundemakinwumi@yahoo.com

Dr. Obododimma Oha, Senior Lecturer in Stylistics & Cultural Semiotics, Department of English, Box 21620, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NIGERIA phone: +234 803 333 1330; email: mmanwu@go.com; blog: http://udude.wordpress.com/

Abstract    The article explores the cultural and semiotic elements of aso alaro, a Yoruba bridal fabric that features interesting animal and domestic object motifs. Generally spectacular bridal aso alaro were stored away after the wedding event and they became treasures that many people beheld later in life particularly because of the design motifs. This paper demonstrates how the iconographic features of the focused bridal fabric could be defined and interpreted by means of verbal arts and in terms of Yoruba cultural values, and attempts to establish that, although this type of cloth design/tradition has eclipsed in the context of modernity, its meanings are significant enough to engage intellectual attention as through which a society tried to articulate its understandings of social and cultural experience.

See All Chapters

What if The Only Legacy of New Media Is a Static Image? The Curatorial Struggle in Preserving New Media’s Aesthetics and Art Practices

ePub

Lanfranco Aceti

Associate Professor in Contemporary Art and Digital Culture, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Sabanci University, Room 2082 Orhanli/Tuzla 34956 Istanbul, Turkey phone: +90 (216) 483 9292; aceti@sabanciuniv.edu

Abstract    The preservation and exhibition of computer and new media artworks is affected by the necessity to present a traditional and objectified image to the viewers. New media practices and computer arts are characterized by evolutionary processes and technological supports that contribute to shaping and defining the aesthetic. If ‘migration’ and ‘emulation’ represent a curatorial strategy or methods for collections’ management, preservation and display to deal with the obsolescence of computer and media-based artworks, the strategy of ‘extrapolation and objectification’ may represent another opportunity to address some of the difficulties presented by the immateriality of these art forms.

Perhaps the methodologies of display should be changed and the possibilities of new media technologies exploited for new curatorial approaches even when they challenge the authority of both the author and the curator by focusing on the representation of the environmental interaction and the importance of multiple media formats of circulation of contemporary digital cultural expressions.

See All Chapters

Opinion

ePub

Opinion

John Waite

John Waite Rare Books, P 0. Box 6, Ascutney, VT 05030, 802-674-2665; jwrb@comcast.net

Since 1 995 I have exhibited at more than 1 50 antiquarian book and paper shows throughout the United States. Of these, the Ephemera Society fair, held annually in southwestern Connecticut, is especially notable for its array of offerings by dozens of dealers of unusual, important, and sometimes astonishing printed and manuscript materials. These materials include collections of letters and diaries, account and ledger books, daguerreotypes, photographs and photo albums; broadsides and historical prints; commissions signed by U.S. Presidents and other significant political documents, chromolithograph advertising, menus, trade cards, trade catalogs, valentines and cigar labels, bookplates, Victorian autograph books, folk art, original cartoons and books with original drawings, playbills and sheet music, miniature and pop-up books, maps and atlases, postcards, bill-heads, checks, stock certificates and banknote engravings, toys, games, and puzzles, die-cuts, cut-outs and silhouettes, almanacs, newspapers, magazines, and more. Though not exclusively, most of the ephemera is American and dates to the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. An embarrassment of riches — one might be tempted to boast — except for the fact that one crucial element in the mix is, if not altogether lacking, at least sorely under-represented.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061807
Isbn
9781442267701
File size
4.11 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata