Medium 9781442267657

Collections Vol 4 N2

Views: 1072
Ratings: (0)

"Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals" is a multi-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the discussion of all aspects of handling, preserving, researching, and organizing collections. Curators, archivists, collections managers, preparators, registrars, educators, students, and others contribute.

List price: $23.00

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Guest Editor’s Foreword

ePub

In coordinating the Spring 2008 and Summer 2008 issues of the journal Collections, my thoughts have turned to my first engagement with sculpture more than a decade ago. As a graduate student at the University of Illinois, I was fortunate to have assisted with an exhibition of original and posthumous casts of the work of Auguste Rodin (1840-1917). On view in the spring of 1997 at the Krannert Art Museum, this show was arranged and supported by The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, an organization that has furthered the promotion and publicity of this seminal artist’s works. The exhibition brought me into contact with a range of works first­hand and introduced me to the art of seduction, that is, how the public could be seduced by the lure of sculpture. Indeed, from this first, yet very important, encounter with sculpture, I suspected that Charles Baudelaire had it all wrong when he wrote in 1846 that sculpture was a bore — reasoning that the origins of sculpture were lost in the mists of time. For Baudelaire, sculpture was easier to make and understand than other art forms because it was three-dimensional and solid, like nature. For him, this ease of comprehension translated into boredom.

See All Chapters

Outdoor Public Sculpture: An Active Medium of Dialogue

ePub

An Active Medium of Dialogue

Juilee Decker

Chair, Art Department, Georgetown College, 400 E. College, Georgetown, KY 40324, phone: 502.863.8173; fax: 502.868.8888 email: jdecker1@georgetowncollege.edu

Abstract      Building upon the simple premise that public sculpture takes its meaning from its context, which may be enhanced and modified or diluted and destroyed, in this essay I consider two avenues of exploration. First, I address placemaking through an examination of five modern outdoor sculptures: Alexander Calder’s La Grande Vitesse, Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, Isamu Noguchi’s Portal, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen’s Free Stamp, and Tom Burr’s Deep Purple. Each work activates a space and engages in placemaking. I also consider the negation of placemaking through a critique of a guerrilla art incident by Newsense Enterprises, a pair of self-appointed authority figures charged with the task of “closing” public sculpture. Second, I offer a conception of public sculpture where artist and audience are equal participants. To do so, I consider the intersection of commission and meaning by raising and addressing issues surrounding the creation and “post-creation life” of public sculpture. In developing this term, I have been informed by Hans-Georg Gadamer’s philosophical notion of Wirkungsgeschichte, Louise Rosenblatt’s “reader-response theory,” and Benedict Anderson’s notion of an “imagined community.”

See All Chapters

Framing or Taming? Some Musings on Public Art as Collection

ePub

Harriet F. Senie

Director of Museum Studies and Professor of Art History, The City College of New York, Compton-Gothals 230, New York, New York 10031; hsenie@ccny.cuny.edu

What are the implications of framing public art as a collection assembled for a city, park, college campus, or any other entity? Collections suggest museums but in spite of some basic similarities, there is much about public art that does not fit easily into a museum paradigm.1

Public art programs typically begin with legislation (think percent-for-art) or bequests (the John B. Putnam Jr. Memorial Collection of outdoor art at Princeton University, for example). To follow museum practices, public art programs would have to have mission statements with specific collecting goals and long range plans that are subject to periodic revisions (perhaps, a good idea).

A museum collection grows by donations and purchases, usually considered in the context of the whole. The collecting strategy may be to lead to strengths or fill in gaps. There are no issues of site, save for the existing space of the building and its grounds. Public art “collections” typically begin with one or a few works and increase in an ad hoc fashion. In a government-funded program, additional works are added based on new construction or rebuilding. On a campus or in a park, individual donations or grant opportunities prompt the acquisition of new works.

See All Chapters

Visual Artists Rights Act: Analyzing the Moral Right of the Artist and the Public

ePub

Analyzing the Moral Right of the Artist and the Public

Anna Heineman

309 ABW, 141 North Riverside Drive,150 Art Building West, Iowa City, IA 52242, anna-heineman@uiowa.edu

Abstract      Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc, a controversial piece of public art, was inconspicuously taken down by the United States General Services Admin istration. The Cor-ten steel arc was dismantled and placed in a storage warehouse in Brooklyn, New York. A year and a half later, the United States Congress passed the Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA), protecting artists and their work from public destruction. Because an artist’s identity is associated with the work itself, the destruction or modification of work in public spaces is now protected by law. The question is posed, would Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc, have been protected if the controversy began after the enactment of the Visual Artists Rights Act? This paper will look at both sides of the enacted law, and whether the law is beneficial to public as well as the artist.

See All Chapters

Telling the Tales: Revealing the Resources

ePub

Revealing the Resources

Susan Nichols

Founding director, Save Outdoor Sculpture!, currently Lunder Education Chair, Smithsonian American Art Museum, MRC 970, PO Box 37012, Washington, D.C., 20013-7012, nicholss@si.edu

Christine Hennessey

Chief, Research and Scholars Center, Smithsonian American Art Museum, MRC 970, PO Box 37012, Washington, D.C., 20013-7012, hennesseyc@si.edu

Abstract      Save Outdoor Sculpture!(SOS!) is a private-public partnership between Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) and Heritage Preservation, charged with completing a national inventory of America's outdoor sculpture and raising public awareness about the value and need to care for those artworks. Through the SOS ! program, a network of volunteers across the country rediscovered the art in their own hometowns. They located and identified outdoor sculpture, provided images, measurements, condition data and print resources to support the dynamic body of information maintained by SAAM. The SOS ! program produced related professional-quality collections management resources for a lay audience.

See All Chapters

Forming an Urban Public Art Collection: A Case Study of the Fairmount Park Art Association

ePub

A Case Study of the Fairmount Park Art Association

Laura S. Griffith

Assistant Director, Fairmount Park Art Association, 1616 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103-5313, 19lgriffith@fpaa.org

Abstract      Chartered in 1872 as the nation’s first public art organization, the Fairmount Park Art Association can be used as a case study for how urban public art collections form and evolve over time. From acquisi tions, purchases and donations, to new commissions and involvement with monuments and memorials, the Art Association has helped build Philadelphia’s collection of cultural treasures. Programs such as Form and Function and New·Land·Marks have changed the approach to the commission process, resulting in artworks that are integrated with the site and connected to the community. Over the years the Art As sociation’s related public art activities have included planning projects, establishing an ongoing conservation maintenance program, advocacy, documentation, and interpretation. These efforts combined with those of other entities and individuals have established Philadelphia as a public art destination with the largest collection of outdoor sculpture in the United States—an attraction for tourists that contributes to the quality of life in the city.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
B000000061817
Isbn
9781442267657
File size
5.45 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata