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Jsl Vol 9-N3

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The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

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Five Faces of Trust: An Empirical Confirmation in Urban Elementary Schools

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WAYNE K. HOY1,*

MEGAN TSCHANNEN-MORAN1

ABSTRACT: After an extensive review of the literature on trust, a multi-faceted definition of faculty trust was developed at three organizational levels: trust in principal, trust in colleagues, and trust in clients. Along with a general willingness to risk vulnerability, five faces of trust emerged: benevolence, reliability, competence, honesty, and openness. This conceptual formulation of faculty trust was then subjected to empirical test, which supported the theoretical underpinnings of the construct. Finally, three trust scales with substantial validity and reliability are offered to researchers and practitioners to analyze antecedents and consequences of faculty trust in other schools.

Trust is a critical element in all human learning (Rotter, 1967), in cooperation (Deutsch, 1958, Osgood, 1959), in leadership (Sergiovanni, 1992), in school effectiveness (Hoy and Sabo, 1998), and in emerging organizational cultures (Hoffman, Sabo, Bliss, & Hoy, 1994). Moreover, trust functions as a way to keep participants in a community integrated and cohesive (Zand, 1971).

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Teacher Efficacy and Teacher Professional Learning: Implications for School Leaders

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JAY PAREDES SCRIBNER1

ABSTRACT: This study examines teachers’ professional development experiences through the lenses of personal teaching efficacy and professional learning. This qualitative study examined the professional development experiences of teachers with either high or low senses of personal teaching efficacy. The study found that the level of personal teaching efficacy influences how and in what ways individual teachers experience professional development. The findings provide support for approaches to professional development that address individual needs. Also discussed are implications for school leaders and others charged with establishing professional learning environments that enhance teachers’ efficacy beliefs.

The 1990s have heard repeated calls from educational policymakers and practitioners for more effective approaches to teacher learning (Corcoran, 1995; Houghton & Goren, 1995). In spite of the acknowledgement that approaches to teacher learning must, and in some cases, are changing, myriad individual and organizational factors that influence teacher learning remain unexplored and little understood (Darling-Hammond & McLaughlin, 1995; Lieberman, 1995). As Eraut (1994) states:

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Training Administrators for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse School Populations: Opinions of Expert Practitioners

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VISHNA A. HERRITY1,*

NAFTALY S. GLASMAN1

ABSTRACT: Cultural and linguistic diversity has changed the social fabric of today’s schools. Currently, there is a wider variety of cultural, language, and family backgrounds than ever before. As a result of the increasing numbers of language minority students with unique educational and social needs, some studies suggest that principals need specialized training to ensure that all students have equal access to an education based on academic excellence and high expectations. Yet there are limited opportunities for aspiring administrators to receive specialized training for working with culturally and linguistically diverse school populations. As a result, many school administrators may lack the necessary preparation to develop policies and implement educational programs for diverse students.

This paper is based on the premise that administrator preparation programs exist within the context of school and society interactions. Changes in administrator practices in school settings require corresponding changes in university-based administrator training programs. The research study reported in this paper describes and examines the recommendations of “expert" principals for the modification of administrator preparation programs based on interactions that exist between the changes in the demographics of society, impact on the schools, and impact on administrators. The goal is that university-based training programs would play a critical role in equipping aspiring administrators with the necessary competencies to become effective instructional leaders in multiethnic school settings.

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Femine Faces of Leadership: Beyond Structural-Functionalism?

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HOPE-ARLENE FENNELL1,*

ABSTRACT: Leadership continues to be a central focus for research in educational administration. Until recently, many studies about leadership have been based largely on the experiences of white males and interpreted based on the structural-functionalist perspective. In this paper the writer explores the phenomenon of leadership through the eyes and experiences of six women leaders who are school principals. The findings are from a recently completed phenomenological study of six women principals’ lived experiences with leadership.

Leadership has always been a central focus for research in educational administration. Until recently, much of what has been studied and taught about leadership has been based largely on the experiences of white males (Shakeshaft, 1989; Glazer, 1991; Blackmore, 1989; Capper, 1993), and interpreted from structural-functionalist perspectives (Burrell and Morgan, 1979; Watkins, 1989). Shakeshaft (1989) and Gosetti and Rusch (1995) both make cases for studying leadership through women’s eyes and experiences, and through more than one perspective or lens. Gosetti and Rusch contend that “Multiple lenses help us focus in more than one way on how we view a concept like leadership and increase our chances of bringing embedded notions into view” (p. 14). Considering leadership from more than one perspective provides a realistic picture of the various views held by individuals working within the schools. Shakeshaft (1989) contends that studying leadership from the perspective of women and their experiences is an initial step in an attempt to bring about a transformation of leadership theory. Glazer (1991) supports Shakeshaft’s contention, stating that “Changing the lens in how we study the professions is the first step in their transformation” (p. 338). She views such changes as the first step in moving women’s experiences beyond classrooms and into principals’ other administrative positions.

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