Medium 9781475817478

Jsl Vol 8-N1

Views: 418
Ratings: (0)
The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $49.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

4 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Faculty Loyalty: An Important but Neglected Concept in the Study of Schools

ePub

FRED REISS1, *
WAYNE K. HOY2

ABSTRACT: Faculty loyalty is conceptualized and operationalized as a multidimensional construct with at least four levels: loyalty to the district, loyalty to the principal, loyalty to colleagues, and loyalty to the association. This research probes organizational factors that facilitate the development of faculty loyalty in urban elementary schools. As expected, school properties that predict one aspect of loyalty are typically different from those that predict other aspects. Predicting loyalty to the association, however, remains elusive.

Organizational theorists have been studying loyalty for over a quarter century. Some studies emphasized important outcomes of loyalty, such as, organization performance (Steers, 1977), employee retention (Porter and Steers, 1973), attendance (Angle and Perry, 1981), and organizational adaptability (Angle and Perry, 1981; Morris and Sherman, 1981). Other analyses stressed the antecedents of loyalty, that is, the personal and organizational characteristics that contributed to employee loyalty (Buchanan, 1974; Hall and Schneider, 1972; Hrebiniak and Alutto, 1972; Kanter, 1977; Salancik, 1977; Sheldon, 1971). Unfortunately, little scholarly attention has been paid to either faculty loyalty in schools or loyalty as a multidimensional construct. In open systems such as schools, organizations must arouse and sustain employee loyalty at many levels, as well as contend for loyalty with external entities that directly or indirectly influence the enterprise. This research has three purposes: first, to conceptualize loyalty as a multidimensional construct; second, to operationalize the dimensions of loyalty; and third, to explore factors that predict each aspect of faculty loyalty in an urban setting.

See All Chapters

Principals’ Perceptions of Their Approaches to Organizational Leadership: Revisiting Bolman and Deal

ePub

MIN B. BISTA1
NAFTALY S. GLASMAN2, *

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to report on a study which examined perceptions of a stratified random sample of California school administrators with regard to their use of behavior strategies. The examination utilizes a four-approach framework developed by Bolman and Deal (1984), and nine specific managerial functions to extract a total of 36 possible sets of behavior strategies. Of all the nine functions the administrators perceived the human resource approach as most extensively used and the political approach as least extensive. Some individual functions showed rankings which were different from the overall approach ranking. The paper provides interpretations for the findings including comparisons to findings of other related studies. Implications for research and practice are derived at the end of the paper.

In a seminal conceptual work, Bolman and Deal (1984) offered a framework for classifying and analyzing approaches which leaders use to manage organizations. The framework includes four approaches called, respectively, the structuralist, the human resource, the political, and the symbolic. Each approach rests on a few (four to seven) key assumptions about central phenomena in organizations (e.g., goal, need, power, symbol) and about how these phenomena become operationalized. The framework also identifies nine management functions (e.g., planning, decision-making) and corresponding leader behaviors associated with each of the four approaches. Thus, the framework contains thirty-six resulting sets of possible leader behaviors.

See All Chapters

School-Based Decision Making and the Empowerment of Secondary School Teachers

ePub

RUSSELL WALL1, *
JAMES S. RINEHART2

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate teacher empowerment in high schools that had a school council over varying lengths of time (either zero, one, two, or three years). Teachers in this study were in a state that mandated a school governance process to involve teachers in the decision-making process. A School Participant Empowerment Scale (SPES) was used to measure empowerment and it contained the following six subscales: decision making, autonomy, self-efficacy, professional growth, status, and impact.

Each teacher received a packet containing a demographic form, the School Participant Empowerment Scale (six scales), and a self-addressed, stamped envelope. The returned data were analyzed by a MANOVA technique resulting in a significant Wilkes-lambda. A follow-up procedure (ANOVA) indicated that a significant difference existed on the decision-making scale between schools with no experience with councils and those with three years experience. There were no significant differences for the remaining subscales. These results are interpreted and implications for practitioners and policymakers are suggested.

See All Chapters

Performance Assessment in the Preparation of Educational Administrators: A Journey

ePub

WILLIS FURTWENGLER1, *
CAROL FURTWENGLER1

ABSTRACT: This article describes a process to assess student performance in educational administration preparation programs. In 1992, faculty in a Midwestern university developed and began testing a leadership expertise performance assessment system. The system includes five performance rubrics, job-related criteria, and multiple evidences for determining leadership expertise. Applications of the faculty’s use of the performance assessment system are presented.

Educational administration programs that adopt outcome performance criteria must develop or find ways to assess each student’s performances toward attaining those outcome standards. The educational administration faculty at a Midwestern university recently confronted this assessment requirement. The department had initiated two all-new, field-based programs for educational administration preparation. The programs were designed to help students become expert leaders who meet job-related criteria similar to those subscribed to by state agencies and national organizations, However, the faculty lacked a performance assessment system necessary to determine the student’s proficiency in meeting the standards of expert leader.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000061833
Isbn
9781475817478
File size
1.15 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata