Medium 9781475817379

Jsl Vol 6-N3

Views: 1115
Ratings: (0)
The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $49.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Letter from the Editor

ePub

Last year, the Journal of the School Leadership began a series of occasional papers on areas of inquiry in educational administration. The purpose was to explore the state of theory and research in various areas of the field and to highlight interesting questions and possibilities for future investigation.

The first article in the series, on cognitive studies in educational administration, was authored by Kenneth Leithwood of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. This article, by a premier scholar on the topic, provided journal readers with a thoughtful overview of a not always well understood area.

The second article, by David Monk of Cornell University, on resource allocation, appears in this issue of the journal. Monk is one of the most distinguished scholars writing on this topic today. As with cognitive studies, Monk’s area of research is one that is not especially familiar to many in our field.

Inquiry often is especially fruitful when it occurs at the intersections of theories, for instance, when explanations about organizations’ internal workings are seen to reflect community and environmental influences; or as in cognitive studies, when administrator learning and response patterns help explain organizational decision making and directions; or, as in resource allocation research, where interest group politics impact on policies which in turn influence the internal distribution of assets. Cognitive studies and resource allocation are both areas that lie not only at theoretical intersections, but also at odd corners, in the sense that relatively small numbers of scholars in educational administration devote their time and energies to those topics.

See All Chapters

Resource Allocation for Education: An Evolving and Promising Base for Policy-Oriented Research

ePub

DAVID H. MONK1

For too many years, those with interests in resource allocation for education have worked in isolation from mainstream scholarly efforts within education administration. The term “resource” has been construed narrowly to deal with central administrative matters that lend themselves to dollar metrics. This practice allows resource allocation issues to become the province of those teaching relatively self-contained courses in educational finance and business administration.

The resulting compartmentalization is unfortunate because it generates barriers that limit the use of a potentially important theoretical perspective that can stitch together a wide range of seemingly disconnected administrative phenomena. So long as we conceive of resource allocation as what school finance and business administration specialists worry about, the door has been closed on a potentially powerful means of understanding a wide range of administrative phenomena.

The compartmentalization is all the more regrettable these days because during the past ten to fifteen years, significant progress has been made toward broadening the resource allocation perspective, particularly at microlevels of the schooling system. Indeed, it is at the microlevels of the system that there is real potential for a broadened resource allocation approach to open the door on productive new lines of inquiry that will nourish the larger field of educational administration.

See All Chapters

Superintendents’ Roles in Curriculum Development and Instructional Leadership: Instructional Visionaries, Collaborators, Supporters, and Delegators

ePub

PAUL V. BREDESON1

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a survey study of superintendents’ work in the areas of curriculum development and instructional leadership. Four primary instructional leadership roles are identified: 1) instructional visionary, 2) instructional collaborator, 3) instructional supporter, and 4) instructional delegator. Further analyses revealed significant differences among instructional leader types in work role priorities, use of time, and in their descriptions of the expectations others had for them in the areas of curriculum development and instructional leadership.

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE

The role of the American school superintendent has undergone numerous changes over the last 150 years. The superintendent was once considered to be the instructional leader and teacher of teachers in the school district. Today the work of superintendents has increasingly become defined by political pressures, high public visibility, unstable school finances, and greater external controls exerted through court rulings, legislation, and state department of education mandates. With time as a limited resource, the more time needed to deal with everything from budgets to buses, the less time there is for issues related to teaching and learning. Responding to changing workplace realities, preparation programs and ongoing professional development opportunities for superintendents emphasize management tasks over issues of instruction and learning. Thus, for survival in many cases, superintendents have delegated the technical core, curriculum and instruction, to others–teachers and principals. As a result, superintendents often find themselves legitimating their curriculum involvement more through rhetoric than through real involvement.

See All Chapters

History of Teacher Pay and Incentive Reforms

ePub

JEAN PROTSIK1

ABSTRACT: Teacher compensation is one aspect of school organization often overlooked in reform efforts aimed at improving student achievement. This paper describes how teacher compensation systems have been structured in the United States since the 1800s to meet the social and educational needs of the time. Current systemic reform efforts suggest the need for another shift in the structure of teacher pay. A well-designed pay system has the potential to act as a powerful incentive for teachers to develop the classroom skills and knowledge necessary to help students achieve at higher levels.

The central question in any discussion of education reform is: What do we want schools to accomplish? Since A Nation at Risk was released, people across the country have been appalled at youngesters’ lack of knowledge and skills. For example, students in the United States consistently score below children in other countries in math and science (Hanushek, 1994). While there is admittedly much disagreement as to the content, most educators would agree that improved student learning should be the focus of school reform efforts. The recent development of national curriculum standards in every academic field, from geography to biological sciences to physical education, signals a renewed concentration on student learning. However, an important ingredient in the success of these curricular reform efforts is the ability of teachers to lead students through the new standards. Do teachers today have the knowledge and skills necessary to accomplish what schools need them to?

See All Chapters

The Revisionists’ Critique of the Education Reform Reports

ePub

LARS G. BJÖRK1

ABSTRACT: While the education reform reports of the 1980s and 1990s indicted public schools for both failing the nation’s youth and economy, the revisionists, a group of eminent scholars and researchers, challenged their assumptions and confronted critics with empirical evidence that demonstrated that schools were in better condition than reported. Although the evidence confirmed that the crisis in American education was manufactured, the public ignored their arguments. This suggests that the reform reports had less to do with their substance than with affirming the nation’s belief that education can help solve pressing national problems, promote social continuity, and convey a sense that the nation’s future is within the bounds of human control.

The magnitude and duration of the education debate during the 1980s and 1990s was launched and sustained by widespread concern for international competition, a declining economy, demographic changes, and the perceived inadequacy of American schooling. The public demand for corrective action created numerous blue-ribbon commissions and task forces which were charged with responsibility for examining the causes of the decline of public education. Most assumed that they would rely on rational decision-making processes which relied on identifying actual problems, analyzing empirical evidence, and reviewing alternative solutions before formulating recommendations. Their findings, often released with great pomp and circumstance, indicted public schools for failing both the nation’s youth and economy, and their recommendations were regarded by many as blueprints for school improvement.

See All Chapters

Preparing School Leaders: What Works?

ePub

KENNETH LEITHWOOD1 *

DORIS JANTZI1

GEORGE COFFIN1

PETER WILSON2

ABSTRACT: Leadership preparation programs in eleven universities receiving grants from the Danforth Foundation were included in this study of preparation program effects and methods. Program graduates (N = 136) in administrative roles provided data about the value they attributed to characteristics of the programs which they had experienced. A sample of their teacher colleagues (N = 739) provided data about the nature and quality of leadership provided by the graduates in their schools. Results suggest that these programs made a significant contribution to leadership as actually practiced in schools, and that constructivist instructional strategies included in preparation programs accounted for much of this effect.

This paper describes the results of a study inquiring about the nature and consequences of a unique set of university-sponsored school leadership preparation programs. Begun in 1987, the “Danforth Foundation Program for the Preparation of School Principals” (DPPSP), was part of a two-pronged effort to more fully develop the potential of school leaders to contribute to school reform (Griffith, Stout, and Forsyth, 1988). Each of the university sites receiving Foundation support was to respond, in their new programs, to some seven concerns about typical preparation programs, which Gresso summed up as follows:

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000061795
Isbn
9781475817379
File size
3.43 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata