Medium 9781475817218

Jsl Vol 3-N4

Views: 1046
Ratings: (0)
The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $49.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

10 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Letter from the Editor

ePub

This issue of the Journal of School Leadership marks the change of editorial responsibilities. I am pleased to be your new Editor. I will be assisted by Don Willower, Consulting Editor and Kenneth Lane, Associate Editor, both of whom assume these positions with enthusiasm and dedication to the journal. We are joined by an outstanding board of reviewers and advisors, ensuring the publication of the best thinking and writing in the field. While our review process is rigorous, we operate on a foundation of fairness with substantive and timely feedback.

The Journal of School Leadership has as its mission to publish quality, relevant research and conceptual papers that inform the practice of educational leadership and provide meaningful inquiry about our field. The articles published in the journal reflect a growing emphasis on quality scholarship and diversity of perspective. It is my goal to strengthen the focus on quality, relevance, and multiple perspectives so that the journal reflects the latest discourse around school leadership and learning.

See All Chapters

Extending the Essential Schools Metaphor: Principal as Enabler

ePub

NONA A. PRESTINE1

ABSTRACT: This article examines the role of the principal in school restructuring using essential school precepts. Based on qualitative data from a longitudinal study covering two and one-half years, the results indicate that the principal must assume a more inclusive and prominent role in schools attempting such restructuring efforts. It is argued that the basic essential schools’ philosophy expressed in the Nine Common Principles must be extended to include the other significant player in school change efforts, the principal. Thus, the metaphor of “student as worker, teacher as coach,” must now be extended to include “principal as enabler.”

In the vast majority of studies concerning the school change/restructuring process, the principal is nearly always portrayed as the key player (Dwyer, Lee, Rowan and Bossert, 1983; Fullan, 1985; Leithwood and Montgomery, 1982; Smith and Andrews, 1989). Although the change impetus may be external or internal, mandated or voluntary, it is the principal who initiates the process of change within the school. It is the principal’s vision that guides, shapes, and molds the school culture. It is the principal who empowers teachers to achieve a cooperative environment and a collaborative role in a shared decision-making process. As the font of initiation, guidance and empowerment, the principal in essence becomes the fulcrum upon which the change process balances. Berman and McLaughlin (1975) call the principal the “gate­keeper of change” and assert that this role is the most influential in determining whether change occurs.

See All Chapters

The Evolving Role of Superintendents in School-Based Management

ePub

JACKIE KOWALSKI1
ARNOLD OATES2

ABSTRACT: As school-based management and collaborative decision making are implemented in the educational system, the role of the superintendent will take on a new look. The superintendent will become a leader of leaders and a collaborative decision maker. The author explores the necessary leadership characteristics and skills of the superintendent in this new role.

The traditional role of the superintendent is that of the executive offcer of a centralized organization. School systems gradually became more and more centralized between 1960 and 1980 as demands for compliance with civil rights mandates and federal and state mandates increased (Hill and Bonan, 1991). This centralized system allows the superintendent to be at the top of the hierarchy of authority. The superintendent’s duties are varied and the powers are broad. Lunenburg and Ornstein (1991) describe some of these duties as: (1) gathering data so that the school board members can make policy decisions, (2) making recommendations regarding the employment, promotion, and dismissal of personnel, (3) preparing the school budget for board review and administering the adopted budget, and (4) developing and evaluating curriculum and instructional programs. The school-based management movement is responding to the tendency for compliance that David Tyack (1990) calls fragmented centralization to decentralization in the school organization.

See All Chapters

The Principal in a Community of Learning

ePub

SISTER PAULA A. KLEINE-KRACHT1

ABSTRACT: Describing schools as “communities of learning” requires that our understanding of the roles played by teachers and principals be altered. This article discusses the principal’s role in a community of learning as both facilitating and modeling learning. It provides examples of both types of behavior and discusses the implications of this re-conceptualization for the pre-service training of administrators.

The Curriculum Committee of the Holmes Group (1991) recently wrote a report to university and school faculty engaged in educating teachers. In the report, entitled “Toward a Community of Learning: The Preparation and Continuing Education of Teachers,” the committee directs our attention to the importance of schools as centers of ongoing learning. The committee writes, “Good schools are places where teachers and students are enabled and encouraged to inquire, invent, and experiment–even to risk failure (p. 15).” While the Holmes Group recognizes that the site administrator plays an important role in the school’s development as a community of learning, this role is described as one of facilitating teachers’ being learners (p. 23). This article discusses the role of the principal in a community of learning as both facilitating and modeling learning activities. It provides examples of principal behaviors that demonstrate learning and support the development of a community of learners and finally addresses some of the reasons principals feel modeling learning behaviors is difficult.

See All Chapters

Cohort Groups in Educational Administration: Promises and Challenges

ePub

BRUCE G. BARNETT1
IVAN D. MUSE2

ABSTRACT: To create a more supportive and collegial learning environment, many educational administration preparation programs are using cohort groups of students. This article traces the development of cohort groups by describing the organizational features and instructional delivery mechanisms used to foster collegial learning and then links these practices to principles of adult learning and development. The effects of cohort groups are explored, including the benefits realized by students and university faculty as well as the challenges this learning structure presents to the teaching faculty. Potential solutions for addressing these challenges are provided.

The reform of educational administration preparation programs has captured the attention of policymakers, professors, and practitioners since the early 1980s. Leading the way for such reform efforts have been reports by the National Commission on Excellence in Educational Administration (1987) and the National Policy Board for Educational Administration (1989). Among the recommendations in these and other reports are suggestions to improve school-university relations, alter recruitment and selection procedures, revise the curriculum, and include periods of intensive full-time study. Recently, the focus has shifted to the instructional delivery system. Murphy (1990), for example, argues that programs should incorporate a variety of instructional formats, and that learning activities should be student-centered, active, personalized, and cooperative.

See All Chapters

Administrators Can Use Alternative Schools to Meet Student Needs

ePub

BARBARA L. GRIFFIN1

ABSTRACT: Students enrolled in an alternative school program indicated they were more satisfied with the alternative program than with a traditional high school program. School administrators should be aware of the perceptions of students toward alternative schools and the implications for traditional secondary schools.

Despite the efforts of educators to respond to research on the characteristics of at-risk youth, and the effects of the school environment on student success, the dropout rate in our public schools continues to be a major concern (Strother, 1986). Researchers estimate that between fifteen and thirty percent of students will drop out before they finish high school, and this percentage is greatly increased among Black and Hispanic minorities attending urban schools, and for those children from low socio-economic backgrounds (Fine, 1986). The effect of this alarming attrition translates into a significant loss of productivity for society and for the individual (Wehlage and Rutter, 1986; Catterall and Stern, 1986; Goodlad, 1983a).

See All Chapters

Leadership Preparation: A Cooperative Effort between a College and School District

ePub

NANCY GRIFFIN MIMS1

ABSTRACT: This cooperative program offers a model and suggestions for school districts and colleges who want to collaborate in the preparation of future administrators. Leadership theories are enhanced by on-site visits and in discussions with the county personnel who put those theories into practice.

State and county departments of education expect school administrators to be well versed in local policies and procedures. Agencies structure various types of internships with numerous in-service and staff development agendas. These internships, however, are usually internal and not connected with college preparation programs.

Local school districts concerned with accountability and restructuring require knowledgeable and skilled leaders. Differences in state and/or local district policies, evaluation instruments, local taxation and ever changing demographics make it difficult for college administration preparation programs to educate all students in common practices. Class time for these prospective administrators does not always allow for specific experiences because students often come from numerous school districts with different policies. At best, guest speakers relate their district’s current practices, and case studies allow for discussion and reflection. Too many courses contain all theory-based text-books and a paucity of practice in practical application.

See All Chapters

Programs for Single-Parent Children: Principals and Single Parents Disagree

ePub

CAROLYN L. WANAT1

ABSTRACT: This article summarizes a study of special school needs of single-parent children in the seventh and eighth grades and the effectiveness of school policies, programs, and practices in responding to those needs. Principals and single parents were interviewed and surveyed in one midwestern state to determine areas of needed program development. Principals felt that schools were more effective than parents in responding to the needs of these children for stability, social acceptance, parental involvement, and adult attention. While principals felt specific approaches were effective, parents wanted a comprehensive response to their children’s complex needs.

While principals are well aware that more children now come from single-parent families, they may be unsure of how the school may best serve these students. Research offers no clear-cut solutions. Many researchers report that the educational and economic deprivation of many single-parent homes affects children’s behavior in school and academic performance (Amundson, 1988; Brown, 1980; Clarke-Stewart, 1989; McLanahan, Garfinkel, and Ooms, 1987; Milne, Myers, Rosenthal and Ginsburg, 1986; Mueller and Cooper, 1986; Norton and Glick, 1986; Schlesinger, 1985; Wallerstein and Kelly, 1980). In a discussion of research on academic achievement of single-parent children, Hetherington, Camara, and Featherman (1983) concluded that very small differences existed between single-parent and two-parent children on IQ tests, standardized achievement tests, and grade point averages, particularly when socioeconomic status was taken into consideration.

See All Chapters

Women in K–12 Educational Administration: A Synthesis of Dissertation Research

ePub

MARILYN L. GRADY1
PATRICIA A. O’CONNELL2

ABSTRACT: One part of the literature concerning women in educational administration that is frequently overlooked is the dissertation research. The purpose of this study is to examine the dissertation research about women in K–12 educational administration. The study profiles the dissertations by purpose, subjects, and findings of the research. Dissertation research included in the study was completed between 1957 and 1989. The review concludes with a summary of trends and promising practices that may lead to gender equity for women as educational administrators.

There is no shortage of literature concerning women in educational administration. For instance, a bibliography of the publications concerning women in educational administration (1965–1990) includes 1,082 titles (Grady et al., 1991). One part of that literature frequently overlooked is the dissertations.

Dissertation research by definition is unique. It reflects a very intensive research activity of a doctoral student that is subjected to oversight by a committee of professors. Often this research is placed on a library shelf without further dissemination or reflection. Findings seldom get translated into any organizational changes.

See All Chapters

University Culture and Educational Administration Reform: Friends or Foes?

ePub

RAYMOND L. CALABRESE1

ABSTRACT: Educational administration programs are in desperate need of change. However, substantive change is unlikely given the rigidity of the university culture and its dysfunctional nature. The demand to change American universities has existed for over a century with little effect. However, faculty resistance, wrapped in a rigid culture, rejects competing ideologies. A new paradigm is needed if university preparation of school administrators is to be credible. One alternative paradigm is based on the relationship between the teacher and learner. In this paradigm, leadership is discovered rather than taught. It is a personal journey for the faculty member and student. The relationship between the teacher and student creates an opportunity for the discovery of different structures grounded in existential theory.

“Everything has changed but our ways of thinking, and if these do not change, we drift toward unparalleled catastrophe” (Einstein, 1990, p. 255). One has to question whether educational administration as a profession can be reformed or restructured if the means of reform or restructuring are based on traditional thought patterns and linear dimension problem solving. In effect, proposed solutions seem to arise with the same logic and similar knowledge base that generated the problem. As a result, solutions to problems in educational administration, although demanded, are “re-fashioned” versions of the older model. This is clearly seen in the curricular and instructional recommendations emanating from recent national reform reports (National Policy Board, 1989).

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000061765
Isbn
9781475817218
File size
1.19 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata