Medium 9781475824513

JEBPS Vol 14-N1

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The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school-based professionals through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines. The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools differs from other scholarly journals in that it features articles that demonstrate empirically-based procedures for readers to apply the practice in their setting.

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Using Peer-Mediated Constant Time Delay to Teach Content Area Vocabulary to Middle School Students with Disruptive Behavior

ePub

Rachel Wannarka
Kathy Ruhl
Richard Kubina

ABSTRACT: Vocabulary knowledge is essential to reading comprehension and general academic success for all learners. For students with disruptive behaviors, vocabulary demands encountered in secondary settings and content area texts can be especially challenging in part due to the frequent occurrence of unfamiliar vocabulary. It is critical that vocabulary instruction make judicious use of time as students move rapidly through curriculum. This article presents results of a study investigating a peer-mediated constant time delay intervention to teach science and social studies vocabulary to middle school students with teacher-identified disruptive behavior. Students demonstrated efficient mastery of target definitions and learned definitions incidentally as a result of teaching their peers. Students also demonstrated generalization to word reading, word production, and to a lesser degree recognition of correct usage on a multiple-choice measure. Implications for practice include selecting useful target words, aligning instructional methods and goals, utilizing carefully selected peer arrangements, and providing sufficient training.

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Pairing Student–Teacher Conferencing and Self-Regulation to Increase Mathematics Performance in Middle School Students at Risk for Academic Failure

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Karen Rizzo
Phillip J. Belfiore

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of individualized student–teacher conferencing (STC) on mathematics performance of three, sixth-grade students at risk for academic failure in a middle school general education setting. For the purpose of this study, STC includes teacher–student interactions resulting in (1) self-monitoring or self-goal setting, (2) error correction, and (3) corrective feedback or self-evaluation. Data were analyzed using a single-subject multiple baseline design across the three students. Results showed that STC, when paired with components of self-regulation, increased the accuracy of mathematics problem completion as measured by a web-based, performance-leveled academic assessment tool.

Difficulty in mathematics usually begins in the elementary school grades and if left unchecked will continue through middle and high school grades (Ketterlin-Geller, Chard, & Fien, 2008; Miller & Mercer, 1997). Montague (2007) stressed that due to the uniqueness of mathematics development, underachievement in mathematics will not only continue but also worsen as students progress through school grades. This uniqueness of mathematics that Montague (2007) describes is a result of (1) learners having to acquire and apply a wide variety of construct-specific concepts and skill sets to be successful across the multiple branches in mathematics (e.g., algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus), and (2) the cumulative effects of general mathematics topics, where new skill acquisition and real-world application depend on acquisition and mastery of previous mathematics skills sets and construct-specific concepts.

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An Application of the Taped Spelling Intervention to Improve Spelling Skills

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Elizabeth McCallum
Ara J. Schmitt
Sarah N. Evans
Kristen F. Schaffner
Krista H. Long

ABSTRACT: The taped spelling intervention (TSI) is a procedure that was developed to improve the performance of students with spelling difficulties. The intervention requires students to listen to a collection of audio files that contain the pronunciation of a word, followed by a pause, and then the correct spelling of the word. Students are instructed to “beat the recording” by writing the correct spelling of each word before it is provided. Components of TSI include numerous opportunities to respond to spelling prompts, immediate feedback on the accuracy of responses, and error correction procedures. This study evaluated the effects of TSI with four middle school students recognized as having reading or writing difficulties. Results indicated immediately increased and sustained spelling performance in response to TSI. Discussion focuses on implications for practitioners and future academic intervention research.

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Example of a Function-Based Choice Assessment for a Student with “Passive” Problem Behavior

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Shawn P. Quigley
Stephanie M. Peterson
Jessica E. Frieder
Carrie Brower-Breitwieser
Stuart Mullins
Heath Ivers
Nicholas Acker

ABSTRACT: A functional behavior assessment (FBA; e.g., O’Neill et al., 1997) can be included as part of a special education determination process (IDEA, 2004). An FBA is typically utilized in conjunction with the development of behavior intervention plans (BIP; e.g., Crone & Horner, 2003) for students exhibiting behaviors that interfere with their education (e.g., self-injurious behavior, hitting, biting, kicking). However, not all behaviors (e.g., sleeping in class) that interfere with a student’s education are so easily assessed. The purpose of this article is to describe a case example in which a student exhibited an absence of behavior (i.e., “passive” behaviors) that interfered with his education and for whom an FBA was inconclusive. A choice assessment procedure was conducted to guide the development of a BIP. The results of the choice assessment and a function-based intervention are presented.

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