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Jsl Vol 1-N3

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The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

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High Retention Rates, No Dropouts among Hispanic Students in California High Schools

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J. ALEX PULIDO1

ABSTRACT: One of the nation’s most serious problems is the high dropout rate among Hispanic students in public school systems throughout the country. The consequences to youth who drop out and to the nation’s economic and social well­being is obvious. The investigator has collected data and looked at school systems throughout California with low dropout rates among Hispanic students. Programs and factors which have a positive influence on retention and keep students from dropping out have been identified. Other pertinent data that have been investigated, including academic achievement, staffing patterns, discipline programs, and leadership correlate well with low dropout rates.

INTRODUCTION

Rapidly changing demographics, in California and in the rest of the nation, are creating a crisis for educational systems and educational leaders. Among the new faces that arrive at the doors of our educational institutions are ever increasing numbers of immigrant children. The new wave of immigrants, which adds to an already large minority population, are creating ever greater challenges for our educational leaders. According to the Association of California School Administrators (1988) the minority student population in California’s public schools has been changing rapidly for 20 years and at the present time California’s schools are composed mostly of minorities. The Association of California School Administrators also states that the greatest increases in minority student populations are among Asians and Hispanics. Asian students will increase from 7% of the student population in 1980 to about 14% by the year 2000. Hispanic students will make up one-third of the total student population. By the year 2000, over 24% of our total population in California will be Hispanics, and the Hispanic student population will be 36%.

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Values Perception and Future Educational Leaders

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ROBERT P. CRAIG1

CYNTHIA J. NORRIS1

ABSTRACT: This article describes a process of incorporating future school administrators’ value clusters into a university preparation program. The university’s role in integrating a values dimension in school administrators’ preparation programs is elucidated. The “Principal’s Reflective Experiential Preparation Program” is described, with an emphasis on the use of the “Hall-Tonna Inventory of Values” to ascertain the future administrators’ value clusters as they relate to the individual’s leadership classification. It is noted that this process of values and leadership articulation affords clarity regarding the future administrator’s philosophical foundations as they relate to educational practice and to the determination of future career decisions. Finally, reflections are given regarding future directions to enhance values integration in administrative preparation programs; such programs are challenged to integrate the candidates’ value clusters—those that energize humans, within programmatic development.

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The Peak Performance School: A Visionary Approach to School Restructuring

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MONTE MOSES1

ABSTRACT: Public schools need revitalization. It can happen through the creation of a new vision that brings inspiration and meaning to the daily life of schools. But in order to find and actualize such a vision, educators will have to break away from old habits and learn to think within a paradigm that is more optimistic about human potential than the one currently dominating the profession.

Without a new vision to guide it, restructuring will take schools no further than previous attempts at reform. Educational restructuring is a fundamental change of assumptions about what schools are for, how they are organized, and how they operate. Lynn Olson (1989) writes, “At its heart, the notion of restructuring emerges from a deep-seated and growing disenchantment with the current system, encompassing both the ways in which the teaching and learning occur and the management of the enterprise.”

INTRODUCTION

It is dismaying to note that despite all of the attention that has been given to reforming and restructuring education in the past ten years, no one has bothered to ask the really fundamental questions: What is the purpose of schooling? Should the purpose be changed? Do students know why they go to school? The answers to these deceptively simple questions show why a new vision for schools is so desperately needed, and they point out what a long road is ahead.

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South Carolina School Reform: The First Wave? or Repression?

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DIANNE S. MONTEITH1

ABSTRACT: Various school attributes, both positive and negative, are a result of the implementation of the Educational Improvement Act in South Carolina. This discussion addresses a possible climate effect as a result of this comprehensive educational reform. A recent study found that 78 percent of the elementary schools in the state evinced a closed climate. Implications for administrators are in-service education for teachers and themselves.

INTRODUCTION

The educational reform movement of the 1980s was ignited by the publication of A Nation at Risk (1983) and was further fueled by other reports, such as The Carnegie Report (1987), that questioned the quality of the nation’s schools as well as the qualifications of those responsible for education in these schools. These reports spurred the majority of states to enact reform legislation. Within the past three to six years, most states have legislated some type of educational reform; indeed, by 1988, nine states (including South Carolina) had legislated comprehensive reforms (Jennings, 1988).

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Clinical Experiences in Educational Administration: A University Collaborates with Local School Districts

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JO ANN KRUEGER1

ABSTRACT: The preparation of educational administrators has been increasingly under indictment for its failure to prepare school leaders effectively (Achilles, 1984, 1990; National Commission on Excellence in Educational Administration, 1987; Murphy, 1990; Hallinger and Murphy, 1991). The criticism has focused on inadequate recruitment and selection procedures, ineffective classroom instruction, low standards for both admission to and completion of training programs, inconsistent content “decoupled from the realities that principals confront on the job” (Hallinger and Murphy, 1991, p. 515), and the perception that graduates are ill-prepared to assume roles in school leadership.

In 1986 The Danforth Foundation initiated a response to the mounting criticism of educational administration preparation programs by sponsoring, over a five-year period, twenty-two university principal preparation programs, or projects, that would incorporate several innovative elements. These elements included, but were not limited to, shared responsibility between universities and school districts for recruiting students, jointly developed curriculum content, full-time internships, and provisions for placing program graduates in administrative positions (Ubben, 1989). The following pages describe, in part, one university’s response, as a Danforth Program for the Preparation of School Principals, in providing a program in educational administration that is more closely linked with the practitioners’ world of school leadership.

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Preparing Tomorrow’s Educational Leaders: An Inquiry Regarding the Wisdom of Utilizing the Position of Assistant Principal as an Internship or Apprenticeship to Prepare Future Principals

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EUGENE L. GOLANDA1

ABSTRACT: For as long as the position has existed, the assistant principalship has been viewed as the logical and proper avenue to prepare aspiring leaders to be principals. In that sense, the position is seen as an apprenticeship or internship experience.

This article questions the wisdom of this assumption and suggests that the assistant principalship is poorly defined and structured; highly unsatisfactory for many, if not most, participants seeking to become a principal; and, perhaps, is actually quite disfunctional as a preparation activity.

INTRODUCTION

The assistant principalship cannot simultaneously function effectively as a career position and as a training experience for future principals. Each of these uses of the position has an orientation and focus entirely different from the other. (Kindsvatter and Tosi, 1971, p. 460)

The hybrid position of assistant principal has been in an evolutionary pattern for the past sixty to seventy years (Van Eman, 1926), but it doesn’t seem to have really evolved. Unfortunately, the position emerged without a proper philosophical basis, and its development as a profession has continued to be more a matter of expedience than an end product resulting from careful planning (Wells, Nelson, and Johnson, 1965).

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