Medium 9781475824469

JEBPS Vol 11-N2

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The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school psychologists and educators through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings

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10 Articles

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Classwide Self-Management of Rule Following: Effect on the On-Task and Disruptive Behaviors of Three Students With Specific Learning Disabilities and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

ePub

Christina M. Terenzi
Ruth A. Ervin
Kathryn E. Hoff

ABSTRACT: A classwide self-management intervention was implemented in a special education resource room to decrease disruptive behaviors and improve on-task behaviors of three sixth-grade males with comorbid learning disabilities and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. All students in the classroom were taught to self-monitor their behaviors focusing on two rules, Be safe and Be respectful, which were part of the schoolwide positive behavior support model. Students rated their own behaviors and the behaviors of the whole class, then matched their ratings to teacher ratings. Results indicate that the implementation of the self-management intervention corresponded with a substantial decrease in the target students’ disruptive behaviors and an increase in their on-task behavior. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

 

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid learning disabilities are at risk for developing later problems such as aggression, academic failure, and alienation from peers (Barkley, 1990; DuPaul & Stoner, 2003). When these children display disruptive off-task behaviors in the classroom, they often interfere with the learning of others and place themselves at even greater risk for later life difficulties (DuPaul, Stoner, & O’Reilly, 2002). Thus, breaking the pattern of disruptive behavior is important to many involved, including the targeted student, whose problems are likely to persist or worsen over time; the student’s peers, whose learning might be affected if the disruptive behavior interferes with instruction; and the teachers, who are faced with difficult challenges in the classroom.

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Classwide Self-Management of Rule Following: Effect on the On-Task and Disruptive Behaviors of Three Students With Specific Learning Disabilities and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

ePub

Christina M. Terenzi
Ruth A. Ervin
Kathryn E. Hoff

ABSTRACT: A classwide self-management intervention was implemented in a special education resource room to decrease disruptive behaviors and improve on-task behaviors of three sixth-grade males with comorbid learning disabilities and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. All students in the classroom were taught to self-monitor their behaviors focusing on two rules, Be safe and Be respectful, which were part of the schoolwide positive behavior support model. Students rated their own behaviors and the behaviors of the whole class, then matched their ratings to teacher ratings. Results indicate that the implementation of the self-management intervention corresponded with a substantial decrease in the target students’ disruptive behaviors and an increase in their on-task behavior. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

 

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid learning disabilities are at risk for developing later problems such as aggression, academic failure, and alienation from peers (Barkley, 1990; DuPaul & Stoner, 2003). When these children display disruptive off-task behaviors in the classroom, they often interfere with the learning of others and place themselves at even greater risk for later life difficulties (DuPaul, Stoner, & O’Reilly, 2002). Thus, breaking the pattern of disruptive behavior is important to many involved, including the targeted student, whose problems are likely to persist or worsen over time; the student’s peers, whose learning might be affected if the disruptive behavior interferes with instruction; and the teachers, who are faced with difficult challenges in the classroom.

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IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES: CLASSWIDE SELF-MANAGEMENT OF RULE FOLLOWING

ePub

Classwide Self-Management of Rule Following

Christina M. Terenzi
Ruth A. Ervin
Kathryn E. Hoff

The study accompanying these implementation guidelines included students in a special education resource room during a language arts instructional block. The target students were three sixth-grade boys who were diagnosed with learning disabilities and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. According to an anecdotal report from the special education teacher as well as additional data sources, the three target students were the most disruptive and off-task students in the class, for which the behavioral management strategies in place did not seem to be effective. The schoolwide positive behavior support program included three rules: Be safe, Be respectful, and Be responsible. As part of the schoolwide initiative, students could earn gold slips in all settings, which consisted of positive written feedback for appropriate rule-following behaviors that could be used as entries in a weekly drawing to win prizes.

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IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES: CLASSWIDE SELF-MANAGEMENT OF RULE FOLLOWING

ePub

Classwide Self-Management of Rule Following

Christina M. Terenzi
Ruth A. Ervin
Kathryn E. Hoff

The study accompanying these implementation guidelines included students in a special education resource room during a language arts instructional block. The target students were three sixth-grade boys who were diagnosed with learning disabilities and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. According to an anecdotal report from the special education teacher as well as additional data sources, the three target students were the most disruptive and off-task students in the class, for which the behavioral management strategies in place did not seem to be effective. The schoolwide positive behavior support program included three rules: Be safe, Be respectful, and Be responsible. As part of the schoolwide initiative, students could earn gold slips in all settings, which consisted of positive written feedback for appropriate rule-following behaviors that could be used as entries in a weekly drawing to win prizes.

See All Chapters

Effects of Strong Kids Curriculum on Students With Internalizing Behaviors: A Pilot Study

ePub

Michelle Marchant
Marenda Brown
Paul Caldarella
Ellie Young

ABSTRACT: Limited research has been conducted in school settings concerning students who demonstrate internalizing symptoms. To respond to the needs of such students, the Strong Kids social and emotional learning curriculum was implemented in three elementary schools to modify the social–emotional symptoms competence of 22 students in third, fourth, and fifth grades who were identified as at risk for internalizing disorders. The effects of this treatment were evaluated by pretest, posttest, and follow-up assessments measuring the students’ internalizing behaviors and their knowledge of emotional and social skills. Participants’ perceptions of the Strong Kids curriculum were also measured. Results indicate a statistically significant decrease in internalizing symptoms, a statistically significant increase in students’ skill knowledge, and a range of perceptions about the curriculum.

The primary purpose of schools is to assist students in their learning endeavors. Because of the interconnection between social–emotional and academic outcomes (McLeod & Kaiser; 2004; H. M. Walker, Ramsey, & Gresham, 2004), children who do not develop social and emotional skills are likely to experience lower levels of peer acceptance, self-esteem, and self-confidence and have fewer successful academic skills (Benner, Beaudoin, Kinder, & Mooney, 2005; DiPerna, 2006; Merrell & Walters, 1998; Wichmann, Coplan, & Daniels, 2004). Developing appropriate social and emotional skills is important for all children and youth—especially, those identified with or at risk for emotional or behavior disorders (Merrell & Walters, 1998; H. M. Walker et al., 2004).

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Effects of Strong Kids Curriculum on Students With Internalizing Behaviors: A Pilot Study

ePub

Michelle Marchant
Marenda Brown
Paul Caldarella
Ellie Young

ABSTRACT: Limited research has been conducted in school settings concerning students who demonstrate internalizing symptoms. To respond to the needs of such students, the Strong Kids social and emotional learning curriculum was implemented in three elementary schools to modify the social–emotional symptoms competence of 22 students in third, fourth, and fifth grades who were identified as at risk for internalizing disorders. The effects of this treatment were evaluated by pretest, posttest, and follow-up assessments measuring the students’ internalizing behaviors and their knowledge of emotional and social skills. Participants’ perceptions of the Strong Kids curriculum were also measured. Results indicate a statistically significant decrease in internalizing symptoms, a statistically significant increase in students’ skill knowledge, and a range of perceptions about the curriculum.

The primary purpose of schools is to assist students in their learning endeavors. Because of the interconnection between social–emotional and academic outcomes (McLeod & Kaiser; 2004; H. M. Walker, Ramsey, & Gresham, 2004), children who do not develop social and emotional skills are likely to experience lower levels of peer acceptance, self-esteem, and self-confidence and have fewer successful academic skills (Benner, Beaudoin, Kinder, & Mooney, 2005; DiPerna, 2006; Merrell & Walters, 1998; Wichmann, Coplan, & Daniels, 2004). Developing appropriate social and emotional skills is important for all children and youth—especially, those identified with or at risk for emotional or behavior disorders (Merrell & Walters, 1998; H. M. Walker et al., 2004).

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IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES: INTERNALIZING BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS: STRONG KIDS CURRICULUM RESPONDS TO THE HIDDEN CHALLENGE

ePub

Internalizing Behavior Problems: Strong Kids Curriculum Responds to the Hidden Challenge

Michelle Marchant
Marenda Brown
Paul Caldarella
Ellie Young

Educators assume a role in helping all children and youth develop appropriate social and emotional skills—especially, those who have significant emotional or behavioral problems. Approximately 20% of children and youth experience mental health challenges, the most common being anxiety, followed by social withdrawal and mood problems, all of which are internalizing behaviors.

The Strong Kids curriculum is designed for teaching social and emotional skills, promoting resilience, strengthening assets, and increasing coping skills of students in Grades 4 to 6, including those with internalizing behavior problems. This curriculum consists of 12 partially scripted and highly structured lessons, similar in format and style, each lasting approximately 45 to 50 minutes; these lessons may be used with high-functioning, typical, at-risk, or emotionally– behaviorally disordered students. The following guidelines explain the framework and steps that can be adopted by schools for selecting students, training educators, implementing the curriculum, and evaluating the outcomes within the school context.

See All Chapters

IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES: INTERNALIZING BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS: STRONG KIDS CURRICULUM RESPONDS TO THE HIDDEN CHALLENGE

ePub

Internalizing Behavior Problems: Strong Kids Curriculum Responds to the Hidden Challenge

Michelle Marchant
Marenda Brown
Paul Caldarella
Ellie Young

Educators assume a role in helping all children and youth develop appropriate social and emotional skills—especially, those who have significant emotional or behavioral problems. Approximately 20% of children and youth experience mental health challenges, the most common being anxiety, followed by social withdrawal and mood problems, all of which are internalizing behaviors.

The Strong Kids curriculum is designed for teaching social and emotional skills, promoting resilience, strengthening assets, and increasing coping skills of students in Grades 4 to 6, including those with internalizing behavior problems. This curriculum consists of 12 partially scripted and highly structured lessons, similar in format and style, each lasting approximately 45 to 50 minutes; these lessons may be used with high-functioning, typical, at-risk, or emotionally– behaviorally disordered students. The following guidelines explain the framework and steps that can be adopted by schools for selecting students, training educators, implementing the curriculum, and evaluating the outcomes within the school context.

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FOURTH ANNUAL WING SUMMIT ON EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN EDUCATION: FEATURE ARTICLES

ePub

Frank M. Gresham

ABSTRACT: Continuous progress-monitoring tools and data-based decisions are not as well established for social behavior as they are for academic behavior using curriculum-based measurement strategies. Progress monitoring for social behavior is important because educators need to know whether a student’s rate of progress in a social–behavioral intervention is adequate to reach an acceptable criterion of proficiency within a specific period. Progress monitoring is required to establish students’ rates of improvement, to identify students who are not responding to intervention, and to make valid decisions about continuing, altering, or terminating intervention. Several progress-monitoring tools have been recommended, including systematic direct observations, direct behavior reports, and behavior-rating scales. Each tool has its advantages and disadvantages. This article examines why none of these tools are sufficient, in and of themselves, for continuous progress monitoring. An alternative—namely, brief behavior-rating scales—is described as being potentially viable. The article concludes with a discussion of various ways of evaluating educationally significant change in interventions.

See All Chapters

FOURTH ANNUAL WING SUMMIT ON EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN EDUCATION: FEATURE ARTICLES

ePub

Frank M. Gresham

ABSTRACT: Continuous progress-monitoring tools and data-based decisions are not as well established for social behavior as they are for academic behavior using curriculum-based measurement strategies. Progress monitoring for social behavior is important because educators need to know whether a student’s rate of progress in a social–behavioral intervention is adequate to reach an acceptable criterion of proficiency within a specific period. Progress monitoring is required to establish students’ rates of improvement, to identify students who are not responding to intervention, and to make valid decisions about continuing, altering, or terminating intervention. Several progress-monitoring tools have been recommended, including systematic direct observations, direct behavior reports, and behavior-rating scales. Each tool has its advantages and disadvantages. This article examines why none of these tools are sufficient, in and of themselves, for continuous progress monitoring. An alternative—namely, brief behavior-rating scales—is described as being potentially viable. The article concludes with a discussion of various ways of evaluating educationally significant change in interventions.

See All Chapters

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