Medium 9781475816464

IJER Vol 15-N3

Views: 1759
Ratings: (0)
The mission of the International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER) is to keep readers up-to-date with worldwide developments in education reform by providing scholarly information and practical analysis from recognized international authorities. As the only peer-reviewed scholarly publication that combines authors’ voices without regard for the political affiliations perspectives, or research methodologies, IJER provides readers with a balanced view of all sides of the political and educational mainstream. To this end, IJER includes, but is not limited to, inquiry based and opinion pieces on developments in such areas as policy, administration, curriculum, instruction, law, and research.
IJER should thus be of interest to professional educators with decision-making roles and policymakers at all levels turn since it provides a broad-based conversation between and among policymakers, practitioners, and academicians about reform goals, objectives, and methods for success throughout the world.
Readers can call on IJER to learn from an international group of reform implementers by discovering what they can do that has actually worked. IJER can also help readers to understand the pitfalls of current reforms in order to avoid making similar mistakes. Finally, it is the mission of IJER to help readers to learn about key issues in school reform from movers and shakers who help to study and shape the power base directing educational reform in the U.S. and the world.

List price: $46.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

8 Articles

Format Buy Remix

A National Educational Cultural Reform Model: Professionalizing the Principalship to Reform a Nation’s Educational System

ePub

Andrej Koren and Arthur Shapiro

There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.

—Niccolo Macchiavelli, The Prince

Globalizing processes in education are reflected in conceptions of “policy borrowing” and knowledge transfer (Halpin & Troya, 1995). These processes tend to be associated with the notion of “developed” and “undeveloped” countries. The idea of a direct-line transfer may be limited in that each nation has developed a culture and numerous subcultures over long periods, which makes it different from those of even its closest neighbors (Appadurai, 1990; Smith, 1990). Therefore, in policy borrowing, nations may borrow elements of policy and institutional practices from other countries that may turn out to be incongruent with their own cultural traditions and cultural context and produce results that may diverge from the expected results in the donor culture’s experiences (Coulby & Jones, 1996; Koren, 2000).

See All Chapters

Transforming the Preparation of Educational Leaders: A Case for Ethical District–University Partnerships

ePub

Whitney H. Sherman

Increasing expectations for school administrators driven by challenges, based on reports from the National Commission on Excellence in Educational Administration in 1987 and the National Commission for the Advancement of Educational Leadership Preparation in 2002, have inspired the creation of new professional standards of practice that have, in turn, motivated districts and universities alike, ones that offer preparation programs for aspiring leaders, to study their traditional blueprints for success (Firestone & Fisler, 2002; Goldring & Sims, 2005; Grogan & Andrews, 2002; Herrington & Wills, 2005; Jackson & Kelley, 2002; Milstein & Krueger, 1997; Young, Petersen, & Short, 2002). Accepted goals and delivery structures have been questioned (Young & Petersen, 2002), and lack of connection between theory and practice, as well as lack of the inclusion of women and minorities, has been criticized (Jackson & Kelley, 2002). According to Hess and Kelly (2005),

See All Chapters

School-Based Crisis Intervention: Its Effectiveness and Role in Broader Crisis Intervention Plans

ePub

Julie Q. Morrison, Charles J. Russo, and Timothy J. Ilg

The tragic violence at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, on April 20, 1999, initiated what could be considered a school-shooting epidemic (Gladwell, 2002) in the years that followed. In the 22 months following Columbine, there were 19 separate incidents of school violence patterned on those shootings and conceived among students in American schools (10 of the 19 incidents were foiled before the plans were initiated). The passage of time has not assuaged the threat. In the week marking the seventh anniversary of the Columbine school shooting, 14 students were arrested in four separate incidents in Kansas, Mississippi, Washington, and Alaska for plotting a school massacre.

These recent incidents of school violence have led to a heightened awareness of the need for effective crisis intervention in schools (Canter & Carroll, 1999; Cunningham & Sandhu, 2000; Larson & Busse, 1998; Poland, 1994; Poland, Pitcher, & Lazarus, 1995; Riley & McDaniel, 2000). Crisis in the context of a school has many unique features related to the social structure and sense of community within schools (Allen et al., 2002). A school crisis exposes children and staff to threat, loss, and trauma that undermine the safety and stability of the entire school (Johnson, 2000).

See All Chapters

Decision Making by School Administrators in the United States and South Africa Using Two Different Standards: The Best Interest of the Child and the Right of Parents to Make Decisions for Their Children

ePub

Ralph D. Mawdsley, P. J. Hans Visser, and Steven B. Permuth

The opportunity for and expectation of parents’ involvement in the education of their children is a staple of the American educational system.1 The absence of parent participation in their children’s education has been decried by educators as a contributing factor to a range of problems in schools, from poor academic performance to disciplinary infractions.2 Although parent involvement is generally viewed as being synchronistic with and supportive of the education provided their children in schools, such involvement can constitute legal challenges to school decisions considered detrimental to their children’s best interests.3

The importance of parent involvement in schools depends very much on a determination of who is a parent. Normally, the best interest of a child is served by parent participation in the child’s education, but how should school administrators respond where parents divided by the custodial terms of a divorce decree disagree on some aspect of their children’s education or where persons who are not natural parents seek access to student information?4

See All Chapters

Burnout in Turkish Computer Teachers: Problems and Predictors

ePub

Deniz Deryakulu

Because computing has been considered to be one of the survival skills of the knowledge age (Trilling & Hood, 1999), many recent educational reform initiatives in developing countries include a computer literacy stage for students and teachers and, later, an information and communication technology diffusion stage to improve access to education, increase the quality of education, and implement educational reform (Arias & Clark, 2004; Perraton, 2000). In 1998, the Turkish Ministry of National Education (MNE) received a loan from the World Bank for the Basic Education Program, which is one of the key elements of the centralized comprehensive national education reform. The primary aims of the Basic Education Program are to expand the scope of basic education and to improve the quality of education. To achieve the latter, the MNE set additional aims, such as that to ensure that each student and teacher become computer literate, to integrate information technologies into school curriculum, and to establish information technology classrooms and computer laboratories in schools (Ministry of National Education, 2004b). At the same time, the MNE revised the curricula of several compulsory courses and designed some new elective courses to contribute to the improvement of the quality of education. In this context, computer as an elective subject was added to the elementary school curriculum in 1998 as 1 or 2 hours per week for Grades 4–8 and was later added to the academic high school curriculum in 2000 for Grades 9–10. The primary aim of this subject is to increase the number of computer-literate students (Ministry of National Education, 1998, 2000).

See All Chapters

Loneliness Among Turkish Adolescents Growing Up in Orphanages and Family Settings

ePub

Mustafa Kutlu

A modern and healthy society can be created only by bringing up the individuals of the society in a healthy way and according to the needs of the modern era. Thus, it is important to grow healthy children and young people. The first duty, which belongs to the family, is to make the children and the young people, who are the hope of the society and guaranty of the future, responsible individuals and to educate them. If the family fails to do so, it is the state that must take over the duty.

In Turkey, the state supplies these kinds of children and young people with education and care with the help of the Institute for Social Services and Children Care, serving under the Office of Prime Ministry. The institution serves the children in need of care and education by grouping them according to age (children 12 years old or younger in children’s homes and children 13–18 years old in orphanages).

The orphanages serving in Turkey are the boarding institutions that have the duty of protecting orphans from social dangers, such as alcohol, drug addiction, sexual abuse, and so on; giving physical and educational care to orphans so that they achieve healthy personal, social, and psychological development; and finding a job or training in a profession for children aged 13–18 years who are in need of protection, have no mother or father (or both), and are left vulnerable to social dangers and bad habits (Law of Institute for Social Services and Children Care, Law No. 2828, Article 3). In these institutions, the children are selected for the orphanage by social workers, who analyze them socially according to criteria—that is, if they are from poor families (in rare cases), if their parents are alive, if they are vulnerable to social dangers, where they live, and so on. In addition to social workers, other staff—including psychologists, teachers, doctors, nurses, and child development experts—are employed in these institutions. Children’s psychosocial developments are observed; their school lives are planned; and the duties and responsibilities concerning their health are realized by the cited staff in a team spirit.

See All Chapters

Malfunction in Hong Kong’s Curriculum Policymaking System: A Case Study of Curriculum Integration

ePub

Shirley Yeung Sze Yin and Lam Chi Chung

Designing a curriculum is much more than a technical process. Indeed, it could be called a political activity because stakeholders usually attribute different values to, and hold different expectations from, a new curriculum. As early as 1949, Tyler had raised this issue in his classic Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction. Kelly (2004) holds the view that curriculum designers should deliberate the value issues when designing curriculum. Lawton’s cultural analysis theory (1975) can also be seen as an attempt to address this issue. By studying the culture of a place, Lawton postulates that an acceptable set of content can be chosen for teachers to deliver in schools.

Who should be responsible for this unenviable task of consensus-building process? In Hong Kong, under the center–periphery curriculum development system, this responsibility should be borne by the official curriculum development agency, the Curriculum Development Institute. Has this system functioned well in the current wave of curriculum reform in Hong Kong? In this article, we report an in-depth case study of the policymakers’ conception of curriculum integration, one of the curriculum reform initiatives in Hong Kong. The research revealed that the system has not been functioning well.

See All Chapters

The Mother–Child Education Program

ePub

Ayse B. Aksoy

Today, there is a big change and increase in sensitivity toward children. The main indicators of this are the studies conducted in the early education area and the application of the education programs. The foundations that make children physically healthy, intellectually wide awake, emotionally self-confident, and ready to learn at the time that they start to study at primary school can be established in the early childhood years. The rapid development of the brain, especially in the early years, is bound to the quality of interactions in the environment in which the child lives and to the extent of the environment’s stimulative features. The conditions that are brought about in relation to the life of children in these early years have a permanent effect on brain development (United Nations Children’s Fund, 1999, 2000).

According to Bronfenbrenner (1974), the most effective and economic unit that makes it possible to carry on the child’s development and education is the family. The programs that do not involve the parents are usually unsuccessful and have only short-term effects. In addition, Bronfenbrenner stresses the interaction between the child and the parent for a program to be successful. He states that modifying the conditions of the child’s home is seen as being more necessary than modifying the institution-based programs (as cited at Wasik, Ramey, Bryant, & Sparling, 1990).

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000047711
Isbn
9781475816464
File size
1.47 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata