Medium 9781475816303

IJER Vol 11-N4

Views: 1086
Ratings: (0)
The mission of the International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER) is to keep readers up-to-date with worldwide developments in education reform by providing scholarly information and practical analysis from recognized international authorities. As the only peer-reviewed scholarly publication that combines authors’ voices without regard for the political affiliations perspectives, or research methodologies, IJER provides readers with a balanced view of all sides of the political and educational mainstream. To this end, IJER includes, but is not limited to, inquiry based and opinion pieces on developments in such areas as policy, administration, curriculum, instruction, law, and research.
IJER should thus be of interest to professional educators with decision-making roles and policymakers at all levels turn since it provides a broad-based conversation between and among policymakers, practitioners, and academicians about reform goals, objectives, and methods for success throughout the world.
Readers can call on IJER to learn from an international group of reform implementers by discovering what they can do that has actually worked. IJER can also help readers to understand the pitfalls of current reforms in order to avoid making similar mistakes. Finally, it is the mission of IJER to help readers to learn about key issues in school reform from movers and shakers who help to study and shape the power base directing educational reform in the U.S. and the world.

List price: $46.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

7 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Curriculum Policy and Nongovernment Schooling: An Argument for a Qualitative Case Study Research Appproach

ePub

Lesley Vidovich and Tom O’Donoghue

Throughout the world at the present time it is quite common to find both government and nongovernment education sectors existing alongside each other. The distinction, of course, is not a clear-cut one since within any country’s nongovernment education sector there is, as Walford (1989) has pointed out, considerable diversity of schools in terms of quality, exclusiveness, and degree of direct and indirect state support received, as well as in terms of the worldview they present to pupils. Nevertheless, nongovernment schools can be distinguished from government or state schools in at least two ways (Walford, 1989). First, they can be defined as schools that were privately founded. Second, they are schools other than those under the governance of a local public school board or a government department.

Nongovernment education is often a highly emotive and frequently irrational area of educational debate, especially when it centers on the degree of government funding and support. Frequently, people take fortified positions, being either for or against it, often on political grounds and often without taking into account the cultural contexts and complexities involved. The result is that the debate is often parochial, confined, and sensitive. This situation invites the development of a research agenda that seeks to enhance our present rudimentary understanding of the various dimensions to nongovernment schooling.

See All Chapters

Reflections of Diversity: British Columbia’s Independent Schools as Indicators of Changing Parental Priorities

ePub

Alastair Glegg

In recent years there has been a great deal of publicity given to the increasingly diverse nature of the population of Canada and the potential impact of this on the schools. At the same time, however, privacy concerns and other forms of regulation have made it increasingly difficult, if not impossible, for researchers to obtain accurate figures regarding such indicators of diversity as the ethnic, cultural, linguistic, and religious backgrounds of students in the public school system.

It is suggested in this article that an analysis of the changing enrollment patterns in British Columbia independent schools can help shed some light on this problem, and illustrate the growing diversity of the overall population. Over the past 20 years there has been a dramatic shift in these patterns: In 1980 approximately two thirds of all independent school students in British Columbia attended Roman Catholic schools, and although the actual number of students at these schools has increased, they now represent only one third of all independent school students. The biggest increase in enrollment has come in the so-called nonaligned independent schools, which include a growing number of religiously and ethnically oriented schools, as well as schools with specific educational philosophies. If we can take the distribution of students in independent schools as being at least to some extent representative of the school age population as a whole, then this study can help provide information to those trying to reconfigure the public schools of the province to serve the needs of an increasingly diverse society.

See All Chapters

Change Dilemmas for Classroom Teachers: Curriculum Reform at the Classroom Level

ePub

John D. Flett and John Wallace

Classroom teachers are generally at the forefront of curriculum reform and hold in their hands the ultimate success and impact of reforms. However, they tend to have little faith in educational theories (Hargreaves, 1984), and teacher traditions and expectations can affect the ability of teachers to deal with change (Louden, 1991). Attitudes acquired by teachers during their training (Brady, 1996), and ownership, involvement, and a sense of meaning have important implications for successfully introducing curriculum innovations (Hargreaves, 1992).

In 1993 the Victorian Department of Education (DoE) began the process of implementing a major statewide curriculum reform in response to a national curriculum framework. The national initiative had a number of implications for teachers; the first implication was that government schools around the nation would eventually be expected to change their curriculum structures to match the new framework. The second major implication was using a system of outcome statements as a basis for assessing student performance on the new curriculum. In Victoria this extended to using student results to assess school and system performance (McFarlane, 1994). Both issues had the potential to affect the way in which teaching and learning in the classroom was conducted, particularly given that there was not universal acceptance of the initiatives (Donnelly, 1993).

See All Chapters

How Principals Level the Playing Field of Accountability in Florida’s High-Poverty/Low-Performing Schools—Part III: Effects of High-Poverty Schools on Teacher Recruitment and Retention

ePub

Part III: Effects of High-Poverty Schools on Teacher Recruitment and Retention

Debra Touchton and Michele Acker-Hocevar

This concludes a three-part series of a case study, intended as part of a larger qualitative and ethnographic study planned over several years. Principals from 10 high-poverty, low-performing elementary schools in Florida, confronting the stigmatizing labels of “low performance,” were asked the question, “What are principals’ views toward the state’s accountability measures in reference to their schools, their roles, and what, if any, effect has external accountability had on internal accountability, or developing the organizational capacity of their school?” By interviewing these principals, we developed a better understanding of how principals balanced the external demands of high-stakes accountability testing, while simultaneously addressing their school’s internal needs.

The principals interviewed were experienced elementary school principals, many of whom had given their lives to improve the educational opportunities for the children in their schools. The ethnic backgrounds of the principals were white, African American, and Hispanic. The gender composition was one male and nine female principals. Informal data collection began several years ago while working with principals in low-performing schools providing technical assistance and professional development. Data sources consisted of semistructured interviews, field notes, and observations. Interviews, conducted over a period of several months, with over 90 hours of transcriptions, were coded and analyzed using a phenomenological approach (Lincoln & Guba, 1985; Miles & Huberman, 1994).

See All Chapters

The Latest Dope on Research (About Constructivism): Part I: Different Approaches to Constructivism—What It’s All About

ePub

Arthur Shapiro

The overwhelming consensus as the twentieth century closed has been that knowledge is constructed.

—D. C. Phillips, Constructivism in Education

Constructivism has suddenly exploded onto our present educational and academic stage with a potency that hardly could be imagined, let alone predicted, in 1990 (although in science and mathematics the “science wars” about constructivism started somewhat earlier). We’ll get at this in a while.

This chapter starts with a (mercifully) very brief overview of the origins of constructivist thinking among the philosophers. We then (again, very briefly) look at some perceptions of the major kinds or forms of constructivism, based on the assumption that it’s probably useful to know what we are talking about.

By this time, some of us may be approaching desperation in our quest to find out what constructivism actually is, so we’ll try to rope it in (but not tie it down) with several definitions, or approaches. We’ll even describe some models of what constructivist classrooms or teams might look like by suggesting essential elements. We then move on and compare and contrast constructivist education with some of the more passive and popular forms of classroom instruction. This will help us to dig into some of the current research on constructivism. It’s useful to have everyone on the same page, that is, that we are talking about the same thing to avoid adding further confusion to our complex and interesting world. Hopefully, it will shed some insight into the impact of constructivist approaches on student, teacher, and administrator growth and learning!

See All Chapters

Litigating Rights Under Federal Statutes: Can Section 1983 Claims Be Brought Under IDEA?

ePub

Ralph D. Mawdsley and Steven P. Permuth

The notion that individuals could bring private actions under section 1983 of the Civil Rights Act of 1871 for violations of rights in federal statutes was recognized for the first time by the Supreme Court in Maine v. Thiboutot (Thiboutot).1 Section 1983 provides a remedy for “deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the Constitution and laws.”2 Since Thiboutot, the Court has reviewed section 1983 claims for alleged violation of federal statutes, with mixed results.3

Federal statutes that require compliance by entities cause concern because the amount of damages recoverable in any lawsuit is unpredictable. This is especially a concern for school officials and school boards that must comply with numerous federal statutes, some of which, such as the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA),4 already carry a heavy financial cost. Under IDEA, schools are not only responsible for the cost of related and support services necessary for students with disabilities to benefit from a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE), but can also be liable for expenses associated with noncompliance, particularly parent reimbursement,5 compensatory education,6 and attorney fees.7 When one considers that, to these IDEA expenses, can be added also the possibility of damage awards under section 1983, school boards are understandingly concerned.

See All Chapters

Book Review of Leadership for Constructivist Schools by Arthur Shapiro

ePub

Lanham, MD: ScarecrowEducation, 2000, 185 pages

Carol A. Mullen

This book is, simply put, a gift to its readers. It helps us to make sense of the constructivist model, ideology, and practice, which elude many educators and leaders. The book takes us on a journey of self-reflection at many levels, showing us how the individual, the context, and the system all function as interrelated forces that can be changed in dramatic and empowering ways for schools. This constructivist approach to leadership in schools takes into account the macro and micro levels of educational systems today, with an appreciation for historical influences. One of the author’s hallmarks as a writer is the way he translates principles of educational leadership and change into practice using case study applications to teaching and learning. Indeed, the literary power of this author is felt in the way that he renders school practitioners and learners as characters who must wrestle their way through problems that often require a combination of vision and strategy (“diagnostic strategic planning”) in order to effect change. (The ideas in the book can be easily transferred to university and other educational systems and even personal circumstances, all of which are alluded to throughout.)

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000047655
Isbn
9781475816303
File size
252 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata