Medium 9781475816242

IJER Vol 10-N2

Views: 1111
Ratings: (0)
The mission of the International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER) is to keep readers up-to-date with worldwide developments in education reform by providing scholarly information and practical analysis from recognized international authorities. As the only peer-reviewed scholarly publication that combines authors’ voices without regard for the political affiliations perspectives, or research methodologies, IJER provides readers with a balanced view of all sides of the political and educational mainstream. To this end, IJER includes, but is not limited to, inquiry based and opinion pieces on developments in such areas as policy, administration, curriculum, instruction, law, and research.
IJER should thus be of interest to professional educators with decision-making roles and policymakers at all levels turn since it provides a broad-based conversation between and among policymakers, practitioners, and academicians about reform goals, objectives, and methods for success throughout the world.
Readers can call on IJER to learn from an international group of reform implementers by discovering what they can do that has actually worked. IJER can also help readers to understand the pitfalls of current reforms in order to avoid making similar mistakes. Finally, it is the mission of IJER to help readers to learn about key issues in school reform from movers and shakers who help to study and shape the power base directing educational reform in the U.S. and the world.

List price: $46.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

About This Edition

ePub

In this spring edition, IJER pays special tribute to Peter McLaren. For nearly a decade, McLaren has served the journal as editor of the internationalist section and is stepping down this year from that post. His work stands as an important contribution to education reform, although for reasons that mainstream educators may resist. Over the years, McLaren’s corpus of essays and interviews have presented a decidedly Marxist orientation. McLaren is respected by his subjects for his questioning the assumptions of globalization and its implications for education reform. In addition, through McLaren’s interviews the marginalized voices in our world are given a platform for discussion.

We exist now in a world marked by devolution, or the redistribution of power down to local levels. As such, we often associate the process of devolution with conservativism, which certainly maintains a dominant hold on devolutionary strategy in the United States. In the United States, devolution usually translates into administrative forms such as performance-indicated approaches that supposedly allow lower-level participants in education greater choice in allocation of resources. Sometimes those means to educational ends are successful, and sometimes not.

See All Chapters

Autonomy and Participatory Democracy: An Ongoing Discussion on the Application of Zapatista Autonomy in the United States

ePub

Interview of Roberto Flores and Greg Tanaka by Peter McLaren

Over the last six years, the Zapatista struggle in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, has attracted the attention of those actively seeking social justice throughout the world. The Labor Party of Brazil in Porto Alegre, the mayor of Venice in Italy, and hundreds of thousands of guerrilla fighters participating in armed struggle, are anxiously examining the fresh and hopeful underlying assumptions and structures of the Zapatista autonomous method and movement. The central thesis of Zapatismo is the profound belief that the only way to accomplish profound change is through the organized participation of the vast majority of civil society. Of particular interest in this discussion is the Zapatista autonomous community as a micromodel and method of struggle. Is autonomy viable in U.S. conditions? Can the autonomous method and structures be imported? Are globalization and its subsequent conditions universal enough at their core to provide the universal context to spontaneously call for an indigenous form of autonomy?

See All Chapters

Education, Struggle, and the Left Today

ePub

Interview of Mike Cole, Dave Hill, and Glenn Rikowski by Peter McLaren

Mike Cole is senior lecturer and research and publications mentor in the School of Education, University of Brighton, U.K. He has written extensively on equality issues; in particular, equality and education. In recent years he has engaged in critiques of postmodernism, globalization, and education. He cofounded the Hillcole Group of Radical Left Educators with Dave Hill in 1989. He is a labor union activist. Contact: m.c.cole@brighton.ac.uk.

Dave Hill teaches in the School of Education, University College Northampton, U.K. For twenty years he was a political and labor union leader. He stood for Parliament for the Labour Party in 1979 and 1987. He has advised the Labour Party on teacher education from a radical Left perspective. With Mike Cole, in 1989, he cofounded the Hillcole Group of Radical Left Educators. Contact: dave.hill@northampton.ac.uk.

Glenn Rikowski is senior research fellow in lifelong learning, Faculty of Education, University of Central England. Glenn’s research includes studies on working students, college finance, vocational education, and Education Action Zones. In 1999, he undertook a major study of the U.K. horological industry. He lives in London. Contact: glenn.rikowski@uce.ac.uk.

See All Chapters

The Killing Fields and the Necessity of Memory

ePub

Interview of Juha Suoranta by Peter McLaren

I am a Finnish male born in 1966 and currently working as a professor of education at the University of Lapland, Finland. I am Anna Sofia’s father and Erja’s husband. In my academic life, I have worked with methodological questions in the educational and social sciences, with qualitative research methods (I have written an introductory book in Finnish on the subject), and recently with the questions of critical (media) pedagogy. My readings and experiences have led me to think of educational and methodological issues more and more as questions of politics and ideology, that they are political in nature.

I think that there is also a biographical factor to this progress. Therefore, I’d like to tell the following historical account. As you well know, we had a civil war in Finland in 1918. It was one of the bloodiest in the history of civil wars. The battle was between the right-wing “Whites” and left-wing “Reds.” My hometown, the city of Tampere, played a central role in the war and, in a way, my destiny—my pure existence—was determined in the final battle of Tampere. My great-grandfather, Anton Suoranta, participated in the Tampere battle on the side of the Reds. After the Whites had won and taken over the town, great-grandfather was taken as prisoner and quickly sentenced to death by firing squad.

See All Chapters

Klingon Pedagogy and Education for the 24th Century

ePub

Interview of Karen Anijar by Peter McLaren

Karen Anijar is an assistant professor of Curriculum and Cultural Studies in the College of Education at Aizona State University. She received her Ph.D. in the Cultural and Social Foundations of Education at the University of North Carolina—Greensboro. She has also attended the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota D.E. Colombia, Florida State University in Tallahassee, and the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida.

Her long awaited first book Teaching Toward the 24th Century—the social curriculum of Trek uses narratives of teachers who are Star Trekkers to highlight the increasingly reaction politics of the United States, the intersections between technology, the military, religion, and education.

Peter: It is a pleasure speaking with you here at the Arizona State University’s (College of Education) First Annual Film and Education Festival. What is it all about? It is not really a conference, nor is it just a film festival.

See All Chapters

Book Review: The Revolutionary Pedagogy of Peter McLaren

ePub

Ramin Farahmandpur

A review of Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Pedagogy of Revolution. Boulder, CO: Rowman & Littlefield, 2000.

And so if you ask us what we want, we will unashamedly answer: “To open a crack in history.”

(Subcornandante Marcos, 2001, p. 212)

The world runs amok as global carpetbaggers looking to become the world’s latest centillionaires take advantage of the results of increasing rights for business owners worldwide—privatization, budget cuts, and labor “flexibility”—due to the engineered absence of government constraint on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services brought about by global neoliberal economy policies. Stacking the shelves of Planet Mall with goods shaped for designer lifestyles becomes the operative strategy. Following in the wake of pushcart, no-frills, bootstrap capitalism, is the cultural flotsam and jetsam produced by the Starbucking and Wal-Marting of the global landscape, as the tyranny of the market ruthlessly subjects labor to its regulatory forces of social and cultural reproduction in the unsustainable precincts of the capitalist market.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000047632
Isbn
9781475816242
File size
493 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata