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IJER Vol 3-N3

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The mission of the International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER) is to keep readers up-to-date with worldwide developments in education reform by providing scholarly information and practical analysis from recognized international authorities. As the only peer-reviewed scholarly publication that combines authors’ voices without regard for the political affiliations perspectives, or research methodologies, IJER provides readers with a balanced view of all sides of the political and educational mainstream. To this end, IJER includes, but is not limited to, inquiry based and opinion pieces on developments in such areas as policy, administration, curriculum, instruction, law, and research.
IJER should thus be of interest to professional educators with decision-making roles and policymakers at all levels turn since it provides a broad-based conversation between and among policymakers, practitioners, and academicians about reform goals, objectives, and methods for success throughout the world.
Readers can call on IJER to learn from an international group of reform implementers by discovering what they can do that has actually worked. IJER can also help readers to understand the pitfalls of current reforms in order to avoid making similar mistakes. Finally, it is the mission of IJER to help readers to learn about key issues in school reform from movers and shakers who help to study and shape the power base directing educational reform in the U.S. and the world.

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PATRICIA DARDAINE-RAGGUET,* DUVON G. WINBORNE* * and THERESA ANN RAJACK†

College of Education

University of Kentucky

Lexington, KY 40506–0017

Generally speaking, the term Caribbean refers to the islands and mainland territories in and around the Caribbean Sea. They may be geographically subdivided into the greater antilles: Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic), and Puerto Rico; and the lesser antilles: U.S. and British Virgin Islands, Barbuda, Anguilla, St. Kitts, Nevis, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Barbados, Grenada, Trinidad and Tobago, Margarita, Bonaire, Curaçao, and Aruba (refer to the map).

While it is documented that Christopher Columbus discovered the region in 1492, “Caribbean” is really a derivative of the word Carib, which signifies the fierce Carib Indian tribe who inhabited the area before Columbus. Navigational errors on the part of this Italian sailor and his crew resulted in another term–West Indies–which is used interchangeably to identify this diverse region of cultures and nations.

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Peter McLaren

Kris Gutierrez

Kris Gutierrez: Your work on schooling, identity, and critical pedagogy is noted for its attempt to locate itself in a discussion of larger social contexts of consumer capitalism and identity formation. You are noted for discussing social and cultural issues related to power that exist outside of the classroom as much as you are for dealing with these issues as they inscribe social relations inside the classroom. This is one of the reasons that I find your work interesting and important. The language that you use is often quite literary and is situated in transdisciplinary theoretical terminology where poststructuralism and theories of post-colonialism, among other theoretical perspectives, play a significant role. I think, however, that this mixture of the theoretical and, if you will, poetical, has both advantages and disadvantages. While it gives you new angles and perspectives on the production of subjectivity within capitalist social formations, don’t you think it tends to restrict your audience to specialists in the critical social sciences and is less likely to find its way into teacher education courses where I would think that you would want your work to be taken up? Your view of contemporary culture is sometimes considered to be quite pessimistic – although far from nihilistic – and I wonder if your criticisms of everyday life in the United States are perhaps deliberate attempts at overstatement for the sake of shocking your readers into an awareness of the very serious social problems that face us. For instance, I read some comments by you recently in which you talked about the ‘structural unconscious’ of the United States resembling the minds of serial killers such as Ted Bundy. You write in the book, Thirteen Questions, “Serial killer Ted Bundy has donated his multiple texts of identity to our structural unconscious and we are living them.” Is this a motivated exaggeration, a form of theoretical hyperbole for the sake of making a point about the violence that pervades everyday life?

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