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IJER Vol 9-N4

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The mission of the International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER) is to keep readers up-to-date with worldwide developments in education reform by providing scholarly information and practical analysis from recognized international authorities. As the only peer-reviewed scholarly publication that combines authors’ voices without regard for the political affiliations perspectives, or research methodologies, IJER provides readers with a balanced view of all sides of the political and educational mainstream. To this end, IJER includes, but is not limited to, inquiry based and opinion pieces on developments in such areas as policy, administration, curriculum, instruction, law, and research.
IJER should thus be of interest to professional educators with decision-making roles and policymakers at all levels turn since it provides a broad-based conversation between and among policymakers, practitioners, and academicians about reform goals, objectives, and methods for success throughout the world.
Readers can call on IJER to learn from an international group of reform implementers by discovering what they can do that has actually worked. IJER can also help readers to understand the pitfalls of current reforms in order to avoid making similar mistakes. Finally, it is the mission of IJER to help readers to learn about key issues in school reform from movers and shakers who help to study and shape the power base directing educational reform in the U.S. and the world.

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DUNCAN WAITE

Professor, EAPS, Southwest Texas State University, 601 University Drive, San Marcos, TX 78666

Many in the field of instructional supervision (or whatever you might call it), are questioning supervision’s mission, relevance, and its place in schooling in the new millennium (e.g., Glanz & Behar-Horenstein, 2000). It would not be amiss to say that those in the supervision field are rethinking its identity (Alfonso, 1997; Glanz, 1997; Gordon, 1997; Starratt, 1997). The professional organizations concerned with instructional supervision—The Instructional Supervision Special Interest Group (SIG) of the American Educational Research Association and the Council of Professors of Instructional Supervision (COPIS)—have taken up the challenge of examining the identity of supervision. At its two most recent meetings, the Instructional Supervision SIG invited internationally renowned, prominent scholars to address the group (Hargreaves, 1998; Cochran-Smith, 1999) in an effort to explore developments in related fields for their relevance to supervision. Likewise, members of COPIS have begun discussion of that group’s relation to the field of practice of supervision and how it might stimulate or otherwise facilitate development of a professional organization for practitioners, and its relationship to such an organization, should one come into being. Throughout this time, dialogue and debate among supervision scholars have touched on the role supervision plays in what heretofore had been its major professional organization, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD), affiliation with which was once a defining element in the identity of supervision scholars and practitioners (see Krajewski, 1997). Efforts on the part of the leadership of ASCD to consider a name change for that organization—a reexamination of how well the present name fits the present organization—resulted in not a little anxiety for supervision theorists and scholars. It seems, with the coming of a new millennium, many entities, organizations, and individuals are taking stock and beginning to consider alternative futures.

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Peter McLaren and Janette Habashi

College of Education, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1521

Peter: Tell me about yourself, Janette. I had the pleasure of meeting you at a conference in Pittsburgh.

Janette: I was born in the old city of Jerusalem, and got my college education from Bethlehem University. This affected my path and helped to cultivate my values. During this time I was politically involved in Palestinian issues. I worked with people with disabilities, drug addition, the elderly, children; I did social work and counseling at a woman’s center. My master’s degree was in counseling in education. This led to work in BirZiet University and with people who are mentally challenged. I worked with the Bedouin community on a project for mentally challenged people. I started my doctorate studies at the Hebrew University in the School of Social Work. I was beset with many obstacles for political reasons. It was very hard to get admission because I am Palestinian. However, I transferred to Kent State University in Ohio and I am a working on my doctorate degree in educational psychology.

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