Medium 9781475819533

Tep Vol 26-N2

Views: 1141
Ratings: (0)

Teacher Education and Practice, a peer-refereed journal, is dedicated to the encouragement and the dissemination of research and scholarship related to professional education. The journal is concerned, in the broadest sense, with teacher preparation, practice and policy issues related to the teaching profession, as well as being concerned with learning in the school setting. The journal also serves as a forum for the exchange of diverse ideas and points of view within these purposes. As a forum, the journal offers a public space in which to critically examine current discourse and practice as well as engage in generative dialogue. Alternative forms of inquiry and representation are invited, and authors from a variety of backgrounds and diverse perspectives are encouraged to contribute. Teacher Education & Practice is published by Rowman & Littlefield.

List price: $41.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

10 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Editorial: STEM Teacher Preparation and Practice—Capturing a “Sputnik Moment”

ePub

PATRICK M. JENLINK

The innovation continuum, from identification and development of talented and creative individuals through the education system, to a STEM career, and then to major scientific breakthroughs or to the creation of a novel produce, is both vast and complex. . . . We have chosen to focus on the human capital component, especially early in the education system, where we feel much of our domestic talent goes unrecognized and undeveloped.

—National Science Board (2010, p. 15)

In his 2011 State of the Union address, President Obama referred to the need for more innovation and research in the United States’ economic growth as our generation’s “Sputnik moment” and tied this innovation to improving the “race to educate our kids.”

Now relegated to history texts, the Soviet Union’s launch of Sputnik in 1957 set in motion a ripple effect in the United States that resulted in reprioritizing science curriculum and inspiring a generation of innovation in technology and engineering in America. The ripple effect also led to fostering initiatives to ensure that a pipeline of scientists would be in place to advance its scientific efforts and increase sustainability as a global leader. Now, over five decades later, the ripple has become a major force directed at improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and to recruit individuals in the STEM field.

See All Chapters

Developing Prospective Teachers’ Knowledge to Foster and Inspire Reasoning in STEM

ePub

DAVID GRUEBER AND S. ASLI ÖZGÜN-KOCA

ABSTRACT: Latest standards-based reform documents from mathematics and science education organizations and communities bring forward one important issue—higher-order thinking skills, namely reasoning. In this article, we share our experiences and our approach to developing an integrated course for mathematics and science prospective teachers centered on fostering reasoning with the use of technology. This study took place in an integrated mathematics and science methods course. The prospective teachers were career changers with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) backgrounds. A sociocultural theoretical approach framed this study, wherein learning is evident in the constructed and enacted plans to engage STEM students in reasoning. The analysis of prospective teachers’ reflections and integrated lesson plans suggested that the structure of the course scaffold with minilesson study helped prospective teachers extend their view of reasoning and consider reasoning when planning lessons in the future.

See All Chapters

Preparing Teachers for New Standards: From Content in Core Disciplines to Disciplinary Practices

ePub

JUSTIN D. BOYLE, VANESSA SVIHlA, KERSTI TYSON, HANNAH BOWERS, JENNIFER BUNTJER, MICHELLE GARCIA-OLP, NICHOLAS KVAM, AND STEPHANIE SAMPLE

ABSTRACT: There are many barriers to the implementation of new practice standards. To implement practices that both prepare and inspire their students, preservice teachers need opportunities to enact reform practices: to prepare and be inspired themselves. These opportunities are found in students’ content courses, methods courses, and field placements. In this article, we interrogate the barriers and supports for implementing reform-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) practices at the end of preservice teachers’ methods courses. Students who have access to reform practices in all three learning contexts are most likely to be prepared to prepare and inspire their future students, whereas other students may actively resist STEM disciplinary practices, possibly because they have had fewer opportunities to experience such practices themselves in both K-12 and higher education classrooms. The weak link for our students provides focus for future work: Almost all students lacked in their ability to design for disciplinary practices.

See All Chapters

Disciplinary Literacy Pedagogy Development of STEM Preservice Teachers

ePub

STEVEN M. HART AND STEPHANIE M. BENNETT

ABSTRACT: The paradigm of content area literacy instruction is shifting from a view of literacy as generalizable across the curriculum to a disciplinary perspective of literacies specific to the specialized language, text structures, and habits of thinking within particular subject areas. Preservice STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) teachers must be knowledgeable in their content fields and possess competence in pedagogical practices that allow them to scaffold their students’ literacy growth within these disciplines. This study examined how infusing a disciplinary literacy project into a content area literacy course affected preservice secondary science and mathematics teachers’ disciplinary literacy pedagogy and practice. The findings of this study suggest that structured inquiry into disciplinary communities enhances preservice teachers’ understanding of disciplinary literacy development, but this knowledge is not easily transferred into classroom instruction. Implications for future research on disciplinary literacy models and preservice teacher preparation are discussed.

See All Chapters

Perceptions, Engagement, and Practices of Teachers Seeking Professional Development in Place-Based Integrated STEM

ePub

LOUIS S. NADELSON AND ANNE SEIFERT

ABSTRACT: As science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) continue to grow in economic and social importance, it is critical that citizenry are prepared to be STEM literate. Furthermore, the workforce demands on STEM necessitate students seeking STEM degrees and pursuing STEM careers. Primary and secondary (K–12) teachers play an important role in helping students develop fundamental understanding of STEM and the motivation to consider STEM professions. However, many teachers are in need of professional development to enhance their effectiveness to teach STEM. Our summer institute (attracting more than 350 teachers per summer) is structured to increase teacher STEM-teaching capacity. With a desire to move to a place-based approach (e.g., leveraging STEM resources in the local community), we sought to establish the perceptions and practices of the teachers who attend our summer institute, as well as the impact of the institute. Of particular interest was how the teachers were using local resources, opportunities, and people to support their STEM teaching. Our results show preinstitute averages for a range of measures with significant increases postinstitute. We also found a range of engagement in place-based STEM practices. Implications and recommendations are provided.

See All Chapters

Preservice Teachers’ Beliefs and Confidence After Working With STEM Faculty Mentors: An Exploratory Study

ePub

PAMELA A. MAHER, JANELLE M. BAILEY,

DALE A. ETHERIDGE, AND DALE B. WARBY

ABSTRACT: This study investigates the impact of a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program that provided preservice teachers access to faculty mentors for advice and feedback in the preparation and delivery of science and math content to elementary school students. Fifty preservice teachers attending a 2-year college in the Southwest taught a STEM lesson to children visiting the college planetarium as part of a school field-trip program. The project partnered teachers in training with faculty in the School of Science and Mathematics to build a support network for these new teachers, thus furthering their understanding of STEM disciplines. Presurveys, postlesson reflections, and interview data were analyzed to determine how working with STEM faculty mentors affected preservice teachers’ beliefs about their ability to teach these fields. The results reveal changes in beliefs and increased confidence toward teaching.

See All Chapters

More Than a Read-Aloud: Preparing and Inspiring Early Childhood Teachers to Develop Our Future Scientists

ePub

JULIA T. ATILES, JENNIFER L. JONES, AND JAMES A. ANDERSON

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of professional development on teachers’ knowledge of teaching science and sense of efficacy regarding the teaching of science. In addition, the study explores the association between knowledge of teaching science and efficacy regarding the teaching of science. Participants included 28 early childhood teachers from seven school districts, predominantly rural with high incidence of poverty. Results indicate gains in teachers’ knowledge of teaching science and their sense of efficacy after participating in professional development. Implications include the need to integrate STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) content and language arts curricula into early childhood classrooms.

There is a strong need for quality STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) teachers, particularly in the K–12 levels. Prepare and Inspire: K–12 Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) for America’s Future, a report to President Obama (President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, 2010), suggests that a new strategy is necessary to stay on the cutting edge of STEM education in our schools. This strategy should prepare and inspire students regarding science and mathematics. The council also recommends that teacher preparation should include not only STEM content knowledge but also the ability to implement STEM concepts seamlessly throughout the curriculum.

See All Chapters

Teaching, Learning, and Leading With Schools and Communities: Preparing Sophisticated and Resilient Elementary STEM Educators

ePub

LARA K. SMETANA, ELIZABETH R. COLEMAN, ANN MARIE RYAN, AND CHARLES TOCCI

ABSTRACT: Loyola University Chicago’s Teaching, Learning, and Leading With Schools and Communities (TLLSC) program is an ambitious break from traditional university-based teacher preparation models. This clinically based initial teacher preparation program, fully embedded in local schools and community organizations, takes an ecological perspective on the development of sophisticated, reflective, and resilient elementary STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) educators who are able to prepare and inspire students and act as agents of change in their schools. This article describes how TLLSC leverages time for STEM across elementary teacher candidates’ entire program through an emphasis on practitioner inquiry and integrated (inter- and transdisciplinary) teaching and learning. TLLSC’s innovative approach is designed to foster STEM habits of mind, integrate scientific practices, and support candidates’ ongoing self-examination of personal and social applications of STEM for themselves and their future students.

See All Chapters

How Does That Work? Developing Pedagogical Content Knowledge From Subject Knowledge

ePub

JUDITH HILLIER

ABSTRACT: The development of subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge has been the focus of much educational research and debate in recent years. Of particular interest is the process by which preservice science teachers develop pedagogical content knowledge from their subject knowledge. In the study presented here, a process of writing narrative explanations of scientific phenomena was developed as part of a preservice teacher education course at a U.K. university. This process revealed the importance of teachers having coherent internal accounts to explain phenomena, which they can then share with students through meaningful discourse and joint action. Developing these coherent internal accounts would appear to be part of the process by which subject knowledge is transformed into pedagogical content knowledge.

Ask typical high school students what makes a good teacher, and their answer will usually include the response that good teachers are able to explain ideas and concepts in a way that students can understand (Wilson & Mant, 2011). However, there would appear to be a lack of science education research into teacher explanations, perhaps because of the recent focus on student learning (e.g., inquiry learning and argumentation) and the association of teacher explanations with a lecturing approach (Geelan, 2012). In this study, an “explanation” is used to denote the story that explains a particular event or phenomenon (Ogborn, Kress, Martins, & McGillicuddy, 1996) and that the teacher wishes to become the common knowledge shared by teacher and student alike and developed “through discourse and joint action” in the classroom (Edwards & Mercer, 1987, p. 161). Explanatory stories are valued, as they help learners to see science as a set of “interrelated ideas,” to see the overarching ideas and not just the detail, and to develop the depth of understanding desired (Millar & Osborne, 1998, p. 2012). It is suggested that understanding the importance of such stories and learning how to develop them is a crucial part of becoming an effective science teacher and that the process of doing so should be explicit within preservice teacher education to prepare science teachers to introduce and develop the scientific story in a persuasive way that helps students to internalize it (Mortimer & Scott, 2003). One approach to this process is presented here from research carried out with two cohorts of preservice science teachers at a U.K. university. Furthermore, the findings contained herein indicate the existence of an important step to be taken when moving from the development of teachers’ subject knowledge to the development of their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK)—namely, that of developing teachers’ coherent internal accounts.

See All Chapters

Field Experience as the Centerpiece of an Integrated Model for STEM Teacher Preparation

ePub

LEIGH A. VAN DEN KIEBOOM, JILL C. MCNEW-BIRREN, ELLEN W. ECKMAN, AND M. BARBARA SILVER-THORN

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to provide a descriptive account of one pathway for preparing high-quality STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) teachers for work in high-need urban schools. In this account, we discuss the supports that STEM majors need in learning how to think about the content that they know well, through an educational perspective that focuses on teaching and learning. We also describe the approach that we use that integrates content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and three extensive teaching co-op experiences to facilitate the transition from successful STEM undergraduate students to effective teachers of STEM content. We suggest that by using the teaching co-op experiences to both filter and reflect on content and pedagogical content knowledge, the STEM undergraduates develop a particularly strong foundation of knowledge for teaching.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000062797
Isbn
9781475819533
File size
1.46 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata