Medium 9781475812022

JSL Vol 23-N4

Views: 1312
Ratings: (0)
The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $41.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Introduction: Women Leading for Social Justice

ePub

WHITNEY SHERMAN NEWCOMB

ANJALÉ D. WELTON

According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2004), there has been a societal shift over the last decade from the traditional expectation that wives are homemakers to the expectation that they are responsible for working outside the home as well. In fact, between 1970 and 2009, women went from holding 37% of all jobs in the United States to approximately 48%— an increase of 38 million women (Baush & Yee, 2011); however, there is a “leaky talent pipeline” in regard to women, and although women represent 53% of new hires, they represent only 37% of those promoted to management positions. Specific to the field of education, women comprise 51% of the general workforce—83% of elementary teachers, 52% of elementary principals, 57% of central office administrators, and 33% of assistant superintendents (Grogan, 2005). Although women have made inroads in school leadership in the United States, a recent American Association of School Administrators study reported that women represent only 24% of the top school leadership position in the United States—namely, the superintendency (Kowalski, McCord, Petersen, Young, & Ellerson, 2010).

See All Chapters

African American Women Aspiring to the Superintendency: Lived Experiences and Barriers

ePub

ROMA B. ANGEL

JIM KILLACKY

PATRICIA R. JOHNSON

ABSTRACT: Focused on the absence of a viable population of African American women in the superintendency, this study addressed barriers described by 10 credentialed, district-level Southern women who hold advanced education degrees coupled with years of leadership experience. This phenomenological study used interview methodology to uncover the lived experiences of African American women who were positioned professionally to apply for the superintendency. A Black feminist construct was employed to interpret personal themes— early expectations, family influences, ethical beliefs, vigilant preparation—that converged with external themes—disconnection from networks, oppression, and selection processes—to reveal obstacles to applying for the superintendency. Profiles of well-credentialed African American women educators are provided.

The superintendency is a complex political position often referred to as a gender-stratified executive position (Bjork, Glass, &Brunner, 2000), with men 40 times more likely than women to advance from teaching to the top leadership position1 within a school district (Skrla &Hoyle, 1999). In a report for the American Association of School Administrators, Glass and Franceschini (2007) stated that 21% of school superintendents were female and only 2% identified as African American female. These numbers are similar to those of North Carolina, the state where this study was conducted. During the 2007–2008 school year, 12 (10.43%) North Carolina superintendents were female, and 2 (1.73%) were African American women. The numbers changed somewhat within the next 2 years, as more women were selected for the superintendency. Twenty-one women (18.26%) held the North Carolina superintendency during the 2009–2010 academic year; however, the number of African American women remained the same—2 women (1.73%) were in the position (North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2009, 2011). In essence there have been very small gains in the numbers of women in the superintendency position and some indication of static growth in the numbers of African American women holding this position. This article examined the perceptions of African American women educators in North Carolina who were qualified for the superintendency but expressed varying levels of concern about seeking the position through their articulations of personal and externally imposed barriers.

See All Chapters

The Subtlety of Age, Gender, and Race Barriers: A Case Study of Early Career African American Female Principals

ePub

GAETANE JEAN-MARIE

ABSTRACT: While all educational leaders face challenges in achieving success, African American female principals often face a unique set of challenges associated with the complexity of their gender, race, and, as examined in this study, age. This case study investigates the experiences of two highly visible, early career African American female principals who confront barriers in their pursuit of the principalship and careers as principals. The primary research question for this study is, what are the experiences of highly visible, early career African American principals in a large urban school district? Specifically, how do age, gender, and race intersect in their professional experiences? Four findings emerged from the study: first, confronting the age barrier on the journey to the principalship; second, barriers at every turn—subtle sexism and racism; third, reaching its apex—the intersection of racism, sexism, and ageism; and, fourth, transcending race, gender, and age barriers—“this too shall pass.” Furthermore, implications for aspiring leaders and leadership preparation programs are presented to explicate how African American females and women in general can challenge barriers that continue to persist in educational leadership.

See All Chapters

“I Love These Girls—I Was These Girls”: Women Leading for Social Justice in a Single-Sex Public School

ePub

KATHERINE CUMINGS MANSFIELD

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to share the findings from a 2-year ethnography that examined female practitioners’ experiences in the field. The article describes the intentions, discourses, actions, and repercussions of female administrators and teachers working to accomplish social justice for racial/ethnic minority girls from challenging economic circumstances. The discourse adjoining social justice intentions and actions is shared with descriptions of the specific material, intellectual, and emotional ways that female educators labored for social justice in their particular context. The impact of taking an explicitly activist stance in facilitating transformative learning opportunities is discussed along with implications for practice.

One of the best ways to get to know “Centro Urbano” is to drive the inner and outer “loops,” followed by north–south cruises on the major interstates and state highways. Without traversing minor streets into specific neighborhoods, one can observe that Southtown, for the most part, shows signs of typical suburban sprawl as many major American cities: The older and poorer neighborhoods cluster toward the city center, and the newer and larger housing spread like a sea of beige and gray on the outer fringes alongside multiple clones of strip malls.

See All Chapters

Finding Our Stride: Young Women Professors of Educational Leadership

ePub

WHITNEY SHERMAN NEWCOMB

DANNA M. BEATY

KAREN SANZO

APRIL PETERS-HAWKINS

ABSTRACT: This work is grounded in the literature on women in the academy and offers glimpses into four young women professors’ experiences in the field of educational leadership. We utilized reflective practice and interpersonal communication to create a dialogue centered on three qualitative research questions that allows a window into our lives. We share our dialogue around emergent themes, rather than as a transcript of our conversations, for impact and efficiency. These themes form the foundation for ideas for change. Strategies for success are outlined: one-on-one mentor matching for new women faculty and graduate students; mandatory financial support for travel and professional development; gender and cultural sensitivity training for all faculty; an annual review of workload expectations and review of productivity tied to merit raises; institutional efforts to equalize salaries between men and women faculty; on-campus child care options; a commitment to experiment with various course delivery options to help with the work–home balance; and the study of the traditional tenure clock. We conclude with words of encouragement for young women professors and with the goal of helping universities and other faculty understand what young women professors’ experiences are like, to encourage social and policy changes aimed toward improvement and greater inclusion.

See All Chapters

Leadership for Social Change: Learning From the Perspectives of Latina/Chicana Activist Educators

ePub

MARCIA VENEGAS-GARCÍA

ABSTRACT: Literature in leadership studies is devoid of knowledge about the unique ways that Latina/Chicana educators engage as leaders, activists, and agents for change. Women’s studies, ethnic studies, and Chicana feminist studies alert us to the complex role that social context and the intersectionality of gender, ethnicity/race, and class play in the development of educators’ leadership approaches. In-depth interviews were conducted with seven Latina/Chicana educators in the border region of San Diego County. A grounded theory approach was used to discover how their activism developed and influenced their views of leadership. Findings showed the critical role of education as sites of struggle and possibility in the evolution of activists’ identities and social justice leanings.

The experiences of Latina/Chicana activists have been significantly absent within the research literature relating to the study of leadership, preventing close examinations into the working-class communities where these women are socially and professionally located (Hurtado, 2003). Theories and constructs in leadership studies have traditionally been dominated by male and business paradigms and often focused on high-profile leaders (Harvard Business Review on Change, 1998; Heifitz, 2001) and less concerned with concepts from a variety of contexts that are inclusive of women’s perspectives in general and Latinas/Chicanas in particular. Leadership scholars have often come from schools of business or are primarily concerned with organizational theories and management models for the study of leadership (Bolman & Deal, 2003; Shafritz & Ott, 2001; Schein, 2004). While useful for individuals interested in the dynamics within corporate or business contexts, they are less useful when studying leadership as a process, such as leadership within marginalized communities, or the lower-profile leadership of those within the educational setting.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000037106
Isbn
9781475812022
File size
576 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata