Medium 9781475812039

JSL Vol 23-N5

Views: 699
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $39.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

A Cultural Approach to Understanding Professional Experiences of Foreign-Born Faculty in U.S. Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

ePub

IRYNA KHRABROVA

KAREN L. SANZO

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the professional experiences of foreign-born faculty members serving in U.S. educational leadership preparation programs, utilizing a cultural approach to discern their lived experiences related to professional life. Cultural values were explored as reflected in professional life experiences. The information, gathered through the phenomenological approach, was used to analyze the influence of national background on the professional experiences of foreign-born faculty in educational leadership preparation programs.

A rapid demographic shift is occurring in American society. The ethnic and racial composition of the U.S. population has been changing substantially over the past four decades (Suarez-Orozco, 2007). In 1970, 9.6 million foreign-born individuals lived in the United States, making up only 4.7% of the population. However, by 2009, 36.7 million foreign-born individuals lived in the country, composing 12.2% of the population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2009). As the United States is being transformed by continuing levels of immigration, the American education system is undergoing change and transformation as well (Stromquist, 2007). Altbach (2006) identified the essential shifts in the cultural, ethnic, and racial diversity of the population, and these are reflected in the diverse student and faculty bodies in higher education in stitutions. Universities desire to attract increasing numbers of foreign-born faculty for the richness that they offer to the learning community.

See All Chapters

Promoting Our Students: Examining the Role of School Leadership in the Self-Advocacy of At-Risk Students

ePub

MUHAMMAD KHALIFA

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this research is to describe how an alternative school leader taught at-risk students and their parents to advocate for students’ educational interests and how this affected students’ academic and social success. In social justice leadership literature, parents and students are described as passive recipients of a strong social justice leader. But the process described in this research, which is referred to here as self-advocacy, demonstrates a way that principals can include stakeholders (i.e., parents and students) in the struggle for school inclusion and social justice. The study was a 2-year ethnographic study that closely examined the students, parents, staff, community members, and principal of an urban alternative high school. The findings suggest that principals can develop students and parents into self-advocates, who can themselves advocate for students’ school inclusion.

It is well documented that public schools are exclusionary toward students of color (Dunbar, 1999; Ferguson, 2000; McKenzie, 2009; Noguera, 2003). Although a number of scholars have described the central role of the school leader in advocating for marginalized students (Normore, Rodriguez, & Wynne, 2007; Siddle Walker, 1993; Theoharis, 2007), there is a gap in the literature demonstrating how parents and students can advocate for themselves along with the school leader. Even though Robert Moses (Moses & Cobb, 2001) argues that true school reforms will not happen until students begin to advocate for themselves, this research offers a glimpse of how school leaders may develop this largely untapped resource. Teachers are more likely to be professionally and socially supportive of White middle-class identities in school (Lareua, 1999, 2000; Noguera, 2003, 2009) and exclusionary toward marginalized Black and Latino indigenous identities. On these considerations, one can more easily accept the descriptions presented in Noguera’s (2003, 2008) works where, for example, “Black boys” are at risk because of factors related to their personal, home, and constructed school lives. In similar ways, Valenzuela (1999) found that schools delegitimize the understandings and cultures of Mexican American immigrants in Texas schools. Research on school dropout and completion rates, along with recent suspension gap research that illustrates trends of Black and Latino students being disproportionately suspended from school (Gregory, Skiba, & Noguera, 2010), all points to one lingering and inconvenient reminder: that schools continue to play a significant role in the failure of Black, Latino, Native American, and other marginalized populations of students. Thus, because students of color are often marginalized in school, they are at significantly higher risks of school failure. The purpose of this research is to describe not only how an alternative school leader enacted social justice in his leadership behaviors but, more important, how he taught at-risk students and their parents to advocate for students’ educational interests and how this affected their academic and social success. This process—referred to here as self-advocacy—can be used as a way to allow principals to include parents and students in the struggle for school inclusion and social justice. I utilize Theoharis’s (2007) definition of social justice leadership, in which school principals advocate for the inclusion of traditionally marginalized groups of children. What emerges is a way that school principals promote school cultures and enact administrative behaviors—with the help of parents and students—that embrace identities of Black and Latino at-risk students.

See All Chapters

Exploring Principals' Nonroutine Problems in Bilingual Immersion Schools: Lessons Learned for Multicultural Leadership

ePub

NITZA SCHWABSKY

ABSTRACT:The present study examines the nonroutine problems that eight Anglo-American principals encountered in managing three elementary bilingual immersion schools in the Northwest United States. Using qualitative inquiry to collect data, I employed the multisited ethnographic research model. The principals reported nonroutine problems in the following educational areas: interpersonal communication, academic practices, organization and administration, and teaching and learning. The findings indicate that social and cultural factors are important in affecting the reporting of these problems. The discussion focuses on the exploration of what makes these problems nonroutine and what lessons are to be learned from these problems concerning leadership in multicultural educational settings.

Despite the increased number of bilingual immersion schools (BISs) in the United States and the challenges that heading these schools present, it is difficult to find research that provides insight into the nonroutine problems that principals of these schools face. This is particularly so in schools where the principals are Anglo-Americans and the instructional team is culturally diverse.

See All Chapters

Educator–Peer Workplace Bullying: Why Leadership Must Address Incivility and Create a Quilt of Caring in the School

ePub

NANCY L. GRAY

MARY E. GARDINER

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to examine educator-peer social relationships within the context of the organization and to consider the role of the school administrator in establishing collegial and caring relationships. The study was a critical collective case study of six educators—administrators and teachers—in U.S. schools. Through interviews, participants reflected on their experiences with educator-peer social relationships. The study found that all participants had experienced a range of positive and negative peer-social relationships, including incivility and incidents of educator-peer bullying. The article concludes with considerations for principals regarding antibullying in the workplace and recommendations for further research.

Recent student suicides based on bullying have moved the topic of school bullying prevention into the mainstream; in fact, secretary Arne Duncan has made the problem a priority at the federal level. Concern for students is more than justified and long in coming. However, the problem can be systemic to the schools and may affect not only students but the culture as a whole. Educators can also be victims of incivility, retaliation, harassment, and bullying. Establishing a school culture free from bullying for all members of the school community requires an understanding of educator-peer social relationships. We define school culture as a set of relationships, beliefs, values, and feelings shared by those who make up a school. Administrators, faculty, staff, parents, friends, students, and others create school meanings. Schools promote a particular orientation toward the world, toward others, and toward the individual or “self” (Henry, 1993, p. 39). An administrator who lacks an awareness of the importance of such meanings in creating a positive school culture may inadvertently support a bullying environment.

See All Chapters

What Principals Do to Improve Teaching and Learning: Comparing the Use of Informal Classroom Observations in Two School Districts

ePub

MARSHA ING

ABSTRACT: Informally observing classrooms is one way that principals can help improve teaching and learning. This study describes the variability of principals’ classroom observations across schools and identifies the conditions under which observations relate to the instructional climate in some schools and not others. Data for this study come from two large urban school districts and include survey responses from principals (n = 461) and teachers (n = 16,862) matched to administrative records. There is little variation in the frequency and duration of classroom observations across schools with different student demographic characteristics. There is evidence that classroom observations are not related to the instructional climate unless they are conducted with a focus on instructional improvement.

Principals who conduct informal classroom observations have the potential to influence teaching and learning (Downey, 2004; Downey, Steffy, English, Frase, & Poston, 2004; Kachur, Stout, & Edwards, 2009; Leithwood & Jantzi, 2005, 2008; Leithwood, Patten, & Jantzi, 2010; Leithwood, Louis, Anderson, & Wahlstrom, 2004; Robinson, 2010; Robinson, Lloyd, & Rowe, 2008; Smith & Andrews, 1989; Waters, Marzano, & McNulty, 2003; Whitaker, 2003). District administrators encourage principals to informally observe classrooms, with some mandating the number of observations that principals conduct each week and providing guidelines on what principals should look for when they visit classrooms (Bloom, 2007; Martinez-Miller >& Cervone 2007; Zepeda, 2007, 2008). Some districts even propose to use principals’ observations as indicators of teachers’ effectiveness (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). However, simply telling principals to be visible in classrooms does not necessarily translate to changes in outcomes such as student achievement or teachers’ instructional practices.

See All Chapters

Knuckling Under? School Superintendents and Accountability-Based Educational Reform

ePub

ABE FEUERSTEIN

ABSTRACT: The goal of this article is to explore the various ways that superintendents have responded to accountability-based educational reform efforts such as No Child Left Behind, the factors that have influenced their responses, and the implications of these responses for current and future educational leaders. With respect to the first issue, empirical data from a number of national studies (T. E. Glass & Franceschini, 2007; Johnson, Arumi, & Ott, 2006; Johnstone, Dikkers, & Luedeke, 2009; Stecher et al., 2008) make clear that while there have been a variety of responses from superintendents to accountability-based reform efforts, superintendents have mostly played a supportive role. Examining the situation more fully suggests that the driving factors behind superintendent support for accountability-based educational reform are complex and are often deeply embedded within the "DNA” of the role of superintendent. This article examines the structure of this DNA by looking at the factors that influence superintendents’ views of accountability-based educational reform from historical, political, and institutional perspectives. This multifaceted approach provides new insights into the complex relationship that exists between the structure of the role of superintendent and the agency of the individuals who inhabit that role.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000037099
Isbn
9781475812039
File size
1.02 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata