Medium 9781475811964

JSL Vol 22-N4

Views: 830
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $39.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

6 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Introduction to a Special Issue: A Nested View of Democratic Leadership and Community

ePub

INTRODUCTION TO A SPECIAL ISSUE

Guest Editors

Lisa A. W. Kensler

Philip A. Woods

The idea that leadership needs to be distributed or shared for it to be most effective in enhancing learning in schools continues to have powerful momentum. For example, a major 5-year study of leadership and learning in the United States concluded in 2010 that “teachers and principals can play a role in increasing student learning by creating a culture of shared leadership and responsibility—not merely among school staff members, but collectively within the wider community” (Louis, Leithwood, Wahlstrom, & Anderson, 2010, p. 10). This followed England’s largest and most extensive study of school leadership, which found “positive associations between the increased distribution of leadership roles and responsibilities and the continuing improvement of pupil outcomes” (Day et al., 2009, p. 4). In conceiving this special issue, we wanted to emphasize that distributing or sharing leadership is not—indeed, should not be—just a management technique but, at its best, is an expression of a much deeper educational purpose concerning students and adults’ development as human beings and as active participants in the creation of their lives and environments (Kensler, 2010; Woods, 2011). This larger purpose is encapsulated in the concept of democratic leadership and community. Specifically, we wanted this special issue to contribute to the development of conceptual tools and provide empirically grounded insights that would help practitioners and policymakers advance more democratic approaches to education in classrooms, schools, and districts, thereby deepening and expanding our understanding of leadership as democratic practice and as a means of promoting education for democratic society and citizenship.

See All Chapters

Degrees of School Democracy: A Holistic Framework

ePub

PHILIP A. WOODS

GLENYS J. WOODS

ABSTRACT: This article outlines an analytical framework that enables analysis of degrees of democracy in a school or other organizational setting. It is founded in a holistic conception of democracy, which is a model of working together that aspires to truth, goodness, and meaning and the participation of all. We suggest that the analytical framework can be used not only for research purposes but also to help enhance democratic professional participation. It is a resource for collaborative professional development by practitioners, offering a vehicle for school communities to reflect together on where they are as a school and where they would like to be.

The purpose of this article is to explore the idea of degrees of internal school democracy through an analytical framework. The framework was developed on the basis of prior theoretical work (in particular, the concept of holistic democracy) and analysis of data in three schools (as detailed in the Method section). The value of focusing on how degrees of democracy could be explored emerged for us from a study of the efforts of one of those schools (the Academy, described later) to distribute leadership and develop emergent leaders among newly qualified teachers to increase innovation in pedagogy, enhance students’ thinking skills, and increase their attainment in tests and examinations. The question of whether this constituted an intensification of performative culture or progress in the direction of democratic professional participation led us to compare and contrast the Academy with two very different types of school to illustrate the varying degrees of democracy and to develop the framework presented in this article.

See All Chapters

The Importance of Belonging: Learning From the Student Experience of Democratic Education

ePub

MAX A. HOPE

ABSTRACT: This article grew out of an extensive piece of grounded theory research that explored students’ experiences of democratic education. A small democratic school in the south of England is used as a case study. Students in this school experienced a strong sense of belonging—to the school itself, with teachers, and with peers. This appeared to make a significant contribution to school outcomes. Data indicated that students’ sense of belonging was in part influenced by the democratic nature of the school, including its style of leadership. This resonated with existing literature. This article outlines key features of the school alongside empirical data about belongingness. A brief review of literature is provided. It concludes with a series of recommendations for practitioners.

The case for connecting democracy with education has been long since made (Dewey, 1916/2004; Goodlad, Mantle-Bromley, & Goodlad, 2004; Gutmann, 1999; Soder, 2001). Goodlad and colleagues (2004), for example, argued that

See All Chapters

Developing Critical Consciousness Through Teacher Leader Preparation

ePub

JILL BRADLEY-LEVINE

ABSTRACT: This article presents findings from a qualitative study describing how a cohort of teachers pursuing their master’s degree in teacher leadership developed critical consciousness through coursework and the cohort structure. The findings—collected via observations, interviews, and document review— indicate the struggles and conflicts that teachers experience as they develop their beliefs about leadership and become critically conscious.

Preparing educational leaders to work for social justice has become a goal of many preparation programs. However, these have typically been aimed at future administrators rather than teacher leaders. In fact, until recently, teacher leaders had few opportunities to engage in formal leadership development. Thus, there is a need to explore the intersection of teacher leader preparation and the development of critical consciousness. Furthermore, the most recent definitions of teacher leadership suggest that critical teacher leaders have the opportunity to influence their colleagues to become critically conscious as well, leading to the development of a critical school culture where democratic school leadership structures give voice to marginalized students, families, and teachers.

See All Chapters

Border Crossing: A Black Woman Superintendent Builds Democratic Community in Unfamiliar Territory

ePub

SUSAN J. KATZ

ABSTRACT: Much of the earlier research on women in leadership has told the stories of White women. Since there are very low numbers of superintendents of color both male and female nationwide, there have been very few stories reported of women leaders of color (Brunner & Grogan, 2007). This article describes the leadership issues involved when one Black woman crossed a border (geographically and culturally) to lead a school district. Delia (pseudonym) became the first woman and the first person of color to lead a small suburban school district whose population was very different from what she was and what she knew. Delia was a participant in a study designed to investigate how women school superintendents promote and support social justice and democratic community building in their school districts. Six women participated in that study: three were African American, one was American Indian, and two were White. This article briefly describes that study and then focuses on Delia, one participant in it who took a risk to apply for her first superintendency in a district not far from her old district in miles but miles apart in population, ideology, and community values.

See All Chapters

Ecology, Democracy, and Green Schools: An Integrated Framework

ePub

LISA A. W. KENSLER

ABSTRACT: Sustainability is the integration of ecological, social, and economic approaches to ensuring healthy local and global communities for present and future generations. Although environmental science and social studies teachers have assumed primary responsibility for sustainability related programs and initiatives, whole school approaches to teaching and learning about sustainability are emerging in K–12 schools (green schools) all around the world (Henderson & Tilbury, 2004). Whole school and whole systems approaches to sustainability not only teach about sustainability via the curriculum but also encourage the school community to become a vibrant place for together learning how members might live more sustainably. Recent research highlights the importance of school leaders and leadership for successful green schools (Birney & Reed, 2009; Higgs & McMillan, 2006; Pepper & Wildy, 2008; Schelly, Cross, Franzen, Hall, & Reeve, 2010). The purpose of this article is to propose a theoretical framework that integrates democratic and ecological principles for describing, explaining, and predicting a continuum of development from more traditional schools to green schools. It ends with suggestions for future research.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000037108
Isbn
9781475811964
File size
1.22 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata