Medium 9781475811759

Jsl Vol 19-N1

Views: 731
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $39.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Editorial: School Leadership—Local Differences, Worldwide Interest

ePub

JEFFREY S. BROOKS

Editorial: School Leadership—Local Differences, Worldwide Interest

When I was in the Philippines conducting research, I was struck by how much school leaders in that country could teach and learn from their counterparts in the United States. Now that I have worked with colleagues in many other countries—including Korea, Haiti, England, Israel, and Hong Kong—I realize how much we all have to share with one another as we seek to understand and improve the preparation and practice of school leadership. Unfortunately, in each of these settings, local mandates and national policies demand a myopic rather than expansive focus—that is, rather than look to our colleagues from around the world for ideas, we are urged to look on the other side of town, across the province, or perhaps in the next state when we might be thinking of the world as a schoolhouse and each country a classroom. To be sure, there is a need to put the global into the context of the local (or glocalization) and to understand how forces worldwide affect student educational experiences and how school leaders can influence these forces to bring new resources and a relevant curriculum to an ever-shrinking world (Apple, Kenway, & Singh, 2005). This issue of the Journal of School Leadership represents a collection of articles that explore some themes that transcend borders.

See All Chapters

Drivers of Success: One District’s Process for Closing Achievement Gaps in a Post–No Child Left Behind Context

ePub

Ann O’Doherty

Martha N. Ovando

Drivers of Success: One District’s Process for Closing Achievement Gaps in a Post–No Child Left Behind Context

ABSTRACT: In this original qualitative study, we examined the processes employed by a school district that had made progress in closing achievement gaps in a post–No Child Left Behind context. The district served more than 26,000 students in an economically and ethnically diverse community. Secondary analysis of the findings uncovered a primary driver—effective, sustained district-level leadership—which drove two secondary drivers: district-developed and deployed systems and a culture of shared accountability. Results of this study suggest that these three drivers caused reported changes at the campus and classroom levels, which in turn contributed to the progress that the district made in closing achievement gaps.

Each year, more than 49 million preK–12 students attend public schools in the United States (National Center for Education Statistics, 2007). To ensure that all children go to school, state laws require attendance. Unfortunately, for too many students of color and students of poverty, mandatory attendance has not resulted in mandatory achievement. Results on national and state measurements continue to reveal shocking achievement gaps between students of color and students of poverty and their White and economically more advantaged peers (Wilkins, 2006). It is time to close and eventually eliminate these achievement gaps and, as stated in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB; 2002), “ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education” (§ 1001.4).

See All Chapters

The Need for Transformational Leadership in Singapore’s School-Based Reform

ePub

Kala S. Retna

Pak Tee Ng

The Need for Transformational Leadership in Singapore’s School-Based Reform

ABSTRACT: In Singapore, decentralization and school-based reforms are key words within the current education reform agenda. This article argues that a key success factor in this agenda is transformational leadership in school. With more autonomy given to the school, transformational leadership at the school level will facilitate the development of school culture and staff capacity, which will in turn facilitate bottom-up initiatives. This article reviews the literature on transformational leadership, reports some research on transformational leadership in schools in other countries, and draws on the results of previous research on transformational leadership in a Singapore school to support its argument.

Economic, social, political, and technological developments have brought about many changes in the Singapore education system to prepare the youth of today to meet the challenges of tomorrow. Because of globalization and increasing economic competition (Koh, 2004; Mok & Welch, 2003), many governments make mandatory education reforms to prepare citizenry to meet the economic challenges (Caldwell & Hayward, 1998; Carnoy, 2000; E. T. J. Tan & Ng, 2005; Townsend & Cheng, 2000).

See All Chapters

Predicting Teacher Success Using Teacher Selection Practices and Classroom Performance Assessment

ePub

Belinda G. Gimbert

Daryl Chesley

Predicting Teacher Success Using Teacher Selection Practices and Classroom Performance Assessment

ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the predictive validity of two preemployment screening devices—the Urban Teacher Perceiver Interview and the Academic Skills Assessment portion of the Praxis Series test—as used by an urban high-need and hard-to-staff school district. Specifically, we compared predictor scores with subsequent teacher assessment scores generated through the Teacher Performance Assessment process. Three research questions directed this study: Is the Urban Teacher Perceiver Interview an effective predictor of teacher performance as measured by the Teacher Performance Assessment? Is the Praxis Series an effective predictor of teacher performance as measured by the Teacher Performance Assessment? Is the combination of the Urban Teacher Perceiver Interview and the Praxis Series an effective predictor of teacher performance as measured by the Teacher Performance Assessment? When each predictor was factored separately, the results indicated a statistically significant relationship between a prospective teacher’s score on the Urban Teacher Perceiver Interview score and the subsequent Teacher Performance Assessment score. No statistically significant relationship between a teacher candidate’s Praxis Series score and subsequent Teacher Performance Assessment was determined. The results indicated increased predictability of subsequent teacher performance when based on both predictors (R2 5 .117).

See All Chapters

Realities of a School–University Partnership: Focus on Leadership

ePub

Estelle Kamler

Michelle Szpara

Michele Dornisch

Karleen Goubeaud

Gavrielle Levine

Seth Brechtel

Realities of a School–University Partnership: Focus on Leadership

ABSTRACT: In this school–university partnership, university faculty team with high school teachers to advance content literacy for immigrant students. Using a narrative research design, we retell stories, chronologically structured by comentoring developmental phases, to retrace our individual teams’ activities. With a distributive perspective of leadership, we examine interactions among university faculty, teachers, and administrators and reflect on the ways of and reasons for accomplishing partnership tasks. In the process, we identify leadership strategies that either offset problems highlighted in the literature or address struggles confronted in this cross-cultural endeavor, and we offer insights regarding essentials for facilitating school–university collaborations.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000037026
Isbn
9781475811759
File size
1.3 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata