List price: $41.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

4 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Teachers’ Perceptions of High-Stakes Testing

ePub

MARIANNE REESE
STEPHEN P. GORDON
LARRY R. PRICE

ABSTRACT: Over 900 Texas teachers were surveyed on their perceptions of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS), which at the time of the survey was Texas’s high-stakes achievement test. The sample included elementary, middle, and high schools within each of four test performance levels: exemplary, recommended, acceptable, and low performing. Respondents answered questions on how students were prepared for the high-stakes test and the effects of the test on their school and its curriculum, students, and teachers. Respondents reported that tested curriculum received increased emphasis, high-stakes testing did not motivate students to learn, and that the test was not an accurate measure of student learning or school effectiveness. Results indicate serious incongruence among proponents’ arguments for testing, teachers’ perceptions of test effects, and the research on authentic pedagogy and student achievement.

See All Chapters

Job Desirability of the University Professorate in the Field of Educational Leadership

ePub

DIANA G. POUNDER
GARY M. CROW
AMY ALDOUS BERGERSON

ABSTRACT: This survey research study uses job choice theory to assess recent educational leadership doctoral graduates’ perceptions of the desirability of the educational administration professorate. Results reveal attractive and unattractive aspects of professorial work as well as those job attributes that are most strongly related to candidates’ assessment of overall job desirability and job intentions.

In the past several years there has been an increasing perception that fewer doctoral students in educational leadership are entering the professorate. A 1997 study (McCarthy & Kuh, 1997) found that the mean age for educational leadership professors in the United States has increased from 48 in 1972 to 52 in 1986 to 54 in 1994. The McCarthy and Kuh study also suggests that the turnover of faculty seems likely to continue during the next decade.

Little research has been conducted on what attracts individuals to enter the professorate. A useful theoretical framework to use in investigating these attractions is job choice theory (Behling, Labovitz, & Gainer, 1968; Young, Rinehart, & Place, 1989). This framework identifies theories of job choice, namely, objective theory, subjective theory, critical contact theory, and the work itself. Objective theory views candidates as “economic beings” who weigh objectively measurable factors in making job choices, for example, salary and benefit packages (Young et al., 1989). The subjective theory of job choice views candidates as “psychological beings,” who consider how the job may meet their psychological needs, for example, social affiliation (Behling et al., 1968). Critical contact theory argues that candidates cannot determine the objective or subjective factors and thus make their job choices based on their initial contact with the organization (Behling et al., 1968). Finally, candidates may be influenced largely by an assessment of the work itself (Young et al., 1989).

See All Chapters

“Yes, but . . .”: Education Leaders Discuss Social Justice

ePub

CATHERINE MARSHALL
MICHAEL WARD

ABSTRACT: This article presents answers to the question: What do powerful educational leaders think about training practitioners for social justice? The data are drawn from interviews with a former governor and leaders from the American Association of School Administration (AASA), National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP), National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the National School Boards Association, the Council of Chief State School Officers, the National Association of State Boards of Education, and others. Respondents noted that social justice issues must be addressed but barriers exist, including that administrators are stressed; the topic is considered too controversial by many; and dominant societal values are barriers. Respondents provided specific advice about training, such as: using policy levers like No Child Left Behind as motivators; start with “the higher calling”; be ethically appealing; put social justice requirements in licensure policy; use coalitions; and write articles in plain language for practitioners. Respondents’ advice can be used to construct good leadership preparation and, ultimately, can lead to a reconstruction of leadership.

See All Chapters

REACTIONS TO MARSHALL AND WARD’S “YES, BUT . . .”: EDUCATION LEADERS DISCUSS SOCIAL JUSTICE

ePub

LINDY ZARETSKY

It is quite gratifying that a scholarly journal would seek, among others, a practitioner’s perspective in responding to the work of its contributors. Indeed, Marshall and Ward’s article in this issue on research on social justice and training for leadership did give me substantial pause for thought. At the outset, then, I applaud their efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Moreover, I wish to entirely align myself with the spirit of the work. Educational institutions are key sites of cultural reproduction, and as such, the ends of social justice can and should be pursued in our schools. As well, I agree that principals, vested with organizational authority, are in prime positions to advance the ends of social justice by addressing inequities and by enabling teachers, parents, students, and other educational stakeholders to prepare students to live in an increasingly pluralistic world. And among my colleagues, there is certainly a heightened awareness surrounding contentious educational issues relating to privileged and marginalized groups of learners. Quite often, the inequities experienced by these “disadvantaged learners” are attributed to contemporary emphases in educational reforms on performance, efficiency, achievement, and assessment, though social patterns of advantage and disadvantage not only predate recent reforms, but also predate public education altogether. Quite successfully, Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of collaboration between scholars and practitioners in the development of educative processes for embedding the ends of social justice into leadership practice. Still, Marshall and Ward’s work raises some concerns as well, which need to be addressed if administrative training for social justice is ever to be realized. For purposes of this reaction, I focus on four key areas of concern: (1) the lack of apparent connection between curriculum, instruction, and social justice, (2) the bifurcation of social justice and school improvement, (3) the absence of practical guidance for school leaders, and (4) the implications of advancing the ends of social justice with policy.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000037065
Isbn
9781475811490
File size
2.52 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata