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Jsl Vol 14-N4

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The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

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Inclusion: The Unifying Thread for Fragmented Metaphors

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LYNN H. DOYLE

ABSTRACT: The fabric of educational leadership is changing. Murphy (2001) has suggested three new metaphors for educational leaders: moral stewards, builders of communities, and educators for school improvement. However, shifting priorities and contradictions between these metaphors could result in fragmentation within the field. This article discusses seven reasons why inclusion of all students, and in particular, students with disabilities, is the unifying thread that weaves these metaphors. Inclusion (a) facilitates discourse for social justice, (b) models democratic community, (c) shifts power, (d) is schoolwide reform, (e) restructures and recultures, (f) targets teaching and learning, and (g) provides support and resources. Implications for educational leadership preparation are discussed.

The challenges facing educational leaders today are considerable. They are, in fact so acute that the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) coordinated the establishment of the National Commission for the Advancement of Educational Leadership Preparation (NCAELP). This commission was charged with four tasks: (a) understanding contemporary contextual factors that impact educational leaders and their preparation programs, (b) examining educational leadership preparation and professional development programs, (c) defining what needs to occur both within and outside the university setting to ensure effective leadership training and professional development, and (d) developing action plans.

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Trauma and Stress in the Principal’s Office: Systematic Inquiry as Coping

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JANE CLARK LINDLE

ABSTRACT: The study of school leaders’ feelings during and about their work suffers from inadequate academic definitions about the depth, character, and legitimacy of those feelings, as well as from limitations on the means of capturing and recording those feelings. This study pushes the definitions of administrators’ stress into the areas of traumatic stress and offers autobiography as a systematic means of investigating and legitimating school leaders’ feelings about their work. Four vignettes drawn from autobiographical inquiry demonstrate the authenticity of this method and the legitimacy of school leaders’ experiences of traumatic stress in their work.

The hazards of leadership that produce stress are a constant theme in the popular literature and professional journals (Bailey, Fillos, & Kelly, 1987; Borg & Riding, 1993; Cutright & Colton, 2001; Fenwick, 2000; Glass, Björk, & Brunner, 2000; Gmelch & Chan, 1995; Lam, 1984; Lam & Cormier, 1998; Mertz, 1999; Torelli & Gmelch, 1993). Nevertheless, while practitioners acknowledge stress and trauma as persistent consequences of their professional work, scholarly attention to these phenomena waxes and wanes, rarely surfacing in major research-based journals in the field of educational administration (Beatty, 2000; Fenwick, 2000; Yerkes & Guaglianone, 1998). The purpose of this article is to fill a gap in the literature on principals’ stress and trauma by offering autobiography as a systematic means of coping with the emotional trauma endemic to the principalship.

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Principal Selection Decisions Made by Teachers: The Influence of Principal Candidate Experience

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PAUL A. WINTER
MARY GRACE JAEGER

ABSTRACT: Public school teachers (N = 189) role-played as members of school councils making principal selection decisions by rating simulated candidates for principal vacancies. The independent variables were principal candidate job experience, candidate person characteristics, and teacher school level. The dependent variable was teacher rating of the job candidate. A three-way ANOVA detected a significant main effect (F[2, 162] = 7.34, p < .001) for candidate job experience. Teachers rated the most experienced candidates higher than the least experienced candidates, but failed to rate the medium experienced candidate higher than the least experienced candidate, or the most experienced candidate higher than the medium experienced candidate. Implications are discussed relative to the practice of teachers selecting principals, selection theory, and future research.

This study addressed the task of selecting school principals when the individuals making the selection decision are teachers serving on local site-based decision-making (SBDM) school councils. Recruiting and selecting qualified school principals has become a national problem (Bowles, 1990; Educational Research Service, 1998; Fenwick, 2000; McAdams, 1998; Mc-Cormick, 1987; Pounder & Merrill, 2001). The pools of qualified applicants for position vacancies are shrinking, and the decline in qualified applicants for principal vacancies is occurring at a time of massive principal retirements among members of the post–World War II “baby boom” generation (National Association of Elementary and Secondary School Principals, 1998). The U.S. Department of Labor (2000) estimates that, while school administrator employment will increase 20% by the year 2008, 40% of the nation’s principals are nearing retirement.

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An Analysis of Principals’ Ethical Decision Making Using Rest’s Four Component Model of Moral Behavior

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JOANN FRANKLIN KLINKER
DONALD G. HACKMANN

ABSTRACT: Secondary school principals confront ethical dilemmas daily. This study examined how MetLife/NASSP Secondary Principals of the Year made ethical decisions conforming to three dispositions from Standard 5 of the ISLLC Standards and if they could identify processes used to reach those decisions through Rest’s Four Component Model of Moral Behavior. Using a descriptive design with a mixed methodological approach of survey research and interviews of selected respondents, state principals of the year (N = 64) were surveyed regarding selected dispositions. Quantitative results indicated that the majority of respondents made ethical decisions regarding the three dispositions tested, but analysis as to the justifications used for those decisions was inconclusive. Qualitative analysis of selected respondents indicated that Rest’s four components are essential justifications for making ethical decisions. Four themes emerged from the qualitative study: courage, a philosophy of the common good, gut feelings, and difficulty in defining ethics.

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