List price: $41.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Teacher Leadership in the Context of Whole School Reform

ePub

JEFFREY S. BROOKS
JAY PAREDES SCRIBNER
JITE EFERAKORHO

ABSTRACT: This article presents findings from a qualitative case study that examined the role of teacher leaders amid whole school reform. Findings suggest that leadership is ambiguous: a contested notion between principal and teacher(s) and among teachers as well. This ambiguity was manifest on the conceptual and operational levels and significantly affected the ways teachers operated as leaders. The article also describes the role and implications of whole school reform as a mediating factor in teachers’ work as leaders.

Our conceptions of the roles of principals and teachers as school leaders continue to evolve. This article examines the leadership roles of teachers and one principal within a uniquely American context in public education—whole school reform. One point of departure for school reform as a contextual characteristic was the 1983 release of A Nation at Risk, which was followed by a slew of national reports on the quality of public education. These reports challenged the efficacy of America’s public schools and doubted the capacity of the education system to meet the economy’s need for a more articulate, literate, committed, and technologically sophisticated workforce and citizenry. These calls were echoed by parents, educators, legislators, and business and community leaders (Carnegie Foundation, 1986; Holmes Group, 1986). Reactions to these criticisms have led to numerous initiatives that have attempted to reform and restructure the nation’s schools (see, for example, Fullan & Hargreaves, 1996; Murphy, Beck, Crawford, Hodges, & McGauphy, 2001; Sergiovanni, 1994).

See All Chapters

Dispositions of Middle School Principals Toward Teacher Selection Criteria

ePub

THEODORE J. KOWALSKI
BRIAN A. DOUGHERTY

ABSTRACT: This study examined the dispositions of Indiana middle school principals toward 29 possible teacher selection criteria drawn from the middle school literature and 13 possible criteria not drawn from this literature. The former were assigned more importance than the latter, and performance-based criteria were assigned more importance than credential-based criteria. Statistical testing revealed no significant associations between principal education and experience characteristics and assigned levels of importance. Findings are compared to previous studies focusing on actual practices, and possible reasons for an apparent disjunction between espoused beliefs and behavior in the area of teacher selection are discussed.

Over the past two decades, reform strategies such as state deregulation and district decentralization have frequently given school principals greater authority in teacher employment decisions. This increased level of responsibility is especially important at the middle school level for two primary reasons. First, many states do not require or issue a separate middle school teaching license, and therefore, principals at this level typically can select teachers with varying academic preparation and licenses. Second, the middle school concept is framed by a philosophy, and implementation of these fundamental values and beliefs depends largely on the knowledge and dispositions of professionals who practice in these schools.

See All Chapters

A School District’s Search for a New Superintendent

ePub

MARY P. KINSELLA

ABSTRACT : This study explores the process one school district employed in its search for, and selection of, a new superintendent. The research design is a single site case study using qualitative methods. Data collection techniques include observation in the form of “shadowing” a search consultant, document analysis, and open-ended interviews of key informants. The study found that, while professional credentials are important in the initial stages of the search, personal attributes prove critical in the eventual “match” of candidate to school district. The “human connection” is a strong determinant of a candidate’s success or failure in advancing in the search process. The search consultant, employed by the school district, acts as gatekeeper of the process, its people, and all pertinent information. The struggle between a candidate’s privacy and the public’s right to know is a central focus in this case. In effect, both candidate and board circumvent the laws protecting personal privacy in employment practices. The search for a new superintendent is people-centered in every convoluted layer of the process.

See All Chapters

Teachers’ Perceptions of Student Bullying: A Conceptual and Empirical Analysis

ePub

PAGE A. SMITH
WAYNE K. HOY

ABSTRACT : This study is an analysis of the nature and meaning of bullying in schools. First, the literature on student bullying is reviewed and a definition of bullying is proposed. Next, we developed a set of items to operationalize teacher perceptions of student bullying. An initial, exploratory factor analysis suggested two rather distinct aspects of bullying—teachers’ description of student bullying and their attempt to protect students from intimidation and harm. A test of the factor structure of the bullying measure in a new comprehensive sample supported the initial conceptualization and measure. Further analysis suggested that there were no gender differences or school level differences in perceived bullying. Finally, student bullying was related to the climate of schools in both surprising and unsurprising ways.

Students’ bullying, harassing, tormenting, and ridiculing other students have increasingly become a problem in our schools. With the rash of shootings in public schools in recent years, the problem and its consequences have become highlighted at a national level (Brooks, Schiraldi & Ziedenberg, 2000; Schiraldi & Ziedenberg, 2001). The media focus on guns and student disturbance has made virtually everyone aware of the fact that too many students are bullied and that such behavior sometimes leads to violence (Casella, 2001). Bullying in schools constitutes a serious problem that may well affect student academic and social development. The purpose of this study was to explore the concept of bullying, to investigate the nature and meaning of student bullying, to develop a reliable measure of the construct at the organizational level, and to examine organizational and individual predictors of bullying in schools.

See All Chapters

Best Practices: Expanding the School Leadership Team—Using Counselors to Facilitate Teacher Collaboration With Families

ePub

ELLEN S. AMATEA
FRAN VANDIVER

ABSTRACT : By expanding the school leadership team to include the school’s counselors, the staff of a K–12 school successfully transformed many of their existing family–school routines into more collaborative efforts. We delineate the history of this change initiative, the goals and objectives for the change project, and the primary organizational change strategies. Finally, we consider the implications of this change project for school administrators and school counselors.

In the past decade, school principals’ interest in helping their staffs strengthen their connections with students’ families has increased exponentially. Several factors have contributed to this trend. First, research has yielded consistent, cumulative findings that home environments and outof-school time contribute powerfully to children’s learning (Bradley & Caldwell, 1984; Clark, 1983; Dornbush, Ritter, Leiderman, Roberts, & Fraleigh, 1987; Kellaghan, Sloane, Alvarez, & Bloom, 1993; Snow, Barnes, Chandler, Goodman, & Hemphill, 1991). Second, school reform efforts that have focused exclusively on changing practices of individual staff members have not been overwhelmingly successful in improving student achievement, especially for low-income and nonwhite students (Kellaghan et al., 1993). Third, federal policies for family involvement have been established in national education goals (National Education Goals Panel, 1999) and further explicated in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; U.S. Congress, 1999), the IASA Title 1 (U.S. Department of Education, 1997), and in No Child Left Behind Title 1 and Title 3 (U.S. Department of Education, 2002). These policies underscore the pivotal role families play in developing children’s learning habits and values. They also suggest that formal involvement of families in their children’s schooling may be a key component in improving the performance of low-income and nonwhite students.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000037061
Isbn
9781475811476
File size
1.14 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata