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Jsl Vol 12-N6

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The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

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The Perfect Match: A Case Study of a First-Year Woman Principal

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P. KAY DUNCAN
CYNTHIA ANAST SEGUIN

ABSTRACT: This case study of a first-year woman principal in a small, rural school district describes succession effects from the perspectives of the female principal, some faculty members, a parent, and another administrator in the district. Open-ended interviews with the participants revealed a number of conflicting perceptions. The new principal perceived that she was successful in bringing about changes in the school on behalf of children. However, most of the faculty members considered the principal to be unsuccessful because she did not value their expertise or listen to their point of view. Some members of the community and the school board adopted the teachers’ perceptions. In the middle of her second year, the principal was terminated. Implications drawn from this case study may be of value to school leaders.

Beginning principals are typically excited about their new jobs and their new roles. They have spent the preceding few years in administrator preparation programs thinking about what kinds of actions they will take upon becoming principals. Doubtless, they have learned from as well as critiqued their past and current principals. They have been exposed to and hopefully gained from their studies, the characteristics and skills needed to be effective educational leaders. They choose their first principalship based on many factors, many believing there is a good match between who they will be as a principal and whom the district/school wants as a principal. Can anything be done when the match turns out to be less than perfect, when the principal believes the first year has indeed been successful, but the majority of the staff and community do not believe the principal has been effective?

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Beyond Dualism, Splits, and Schisms: Social Justice for a Renewal of Vocational–Academic Education

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CAROL A. MULLEN with ALAN R. KOHAN

ABSTRACT: To fulfill the democratic dream for American schooling, educators and policymakers need to work together for the same common cause: reforming the academic-vocational dichotomy of schooling that has persisted over the past century. Academic subjects continue to be separated from vocational schooling with the effect of diluting each domain’s effectiveness. The Deweyian vision of social justice provides a solution for healing this fundamental dualism that characterizes schooling. Even where integration has been attempted using academic-vocational models, tracking continues in public schools without commitment to whole-school reform design. This article discusses these issues in the context of the history of vocational education and Dewey’s perspective of integrated education through the occupations. The authors also illustrate the concepts presented through promising whole-school reform designs for democratizing the public education system. Policy implications are addressed for moving toward a socially just system of schooling.

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Two Women High School Principals: The Influence of Gender on Entry Into Education and Their Professional Lives

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KAETLYN LAD

ABSTRACT: This study explores the influences of being female on the lives of two women high school principals. The study focuses on how being female influenced their career choices and subsequent professional lives. The data presented are a subset of a larger set of data collected during a case study. The data indicate that career choices, behavior expectations and treatment, career advancement, and time demands are ways in which being female influenced them in their professional lives. Recommendations are made as to how the principalship might be restructured to attract more women (and men) to aspire to be high school principals.

In analyzing the research of past decades in educational leadership, it becomes clear that a low percentage of women have traditionally secured educational administrative positions in our public school systems (Glass, 1992; Jones & Montenegro, 1982; Moore, 1981; Niedermayer & Kramer, 1974; Shakeshaft, 1987). Studies show that, until recently, no significant changes have occurred in the historically predominant pattern of women teaching and men managing (Bell & Chase, 1993; Blount, 1993; Edson, 1988; Estler, 1975; Glass, 1992; Marshall, 1984; Shakeshaft, 1987; Tallerico & Burnstyn, 1996). The underrepresentation of women is most strikingly evident in the superintendency and high school principalship (Tallerico & Burnstyn, 1996). It is only in studies published during the latter part of 1990s that some indications of progress in hiring patterns becomes evident (Brunner, 1997; Dunlap & Schmuck, 1995; Grogan, 1996; Mertz & McNeely, 1998; Nogay & Beebe, 1997; Tallerico, Poole, & Burnstyn, 1994).

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SPECIAL SECTION: PROFESSING EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP: EXPERIENCES FOR THE UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM, PART 1

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SPECIAL SECTION

Guest Editor: Carolyn Carr

This special section will appear in the next four issues of the Journal of School Leadership. The foreword by Barbara Jackson that follows provides further information about the context, content, format, and authors.

Address correspondence to: Carolyn Carr, Portland State University, School of Education, Box 751, Portland, OR 97207, E-mail: Carrc1@pdx.edu

BARBARA L. JACKSON

Power and caring; bias and social justice; equity; fairness; privileged preferences; personal and professional identities; independence; empowerment; kindness, and obedience—ideas and concepts familiar to all but with different meanings and uses. Does power get in the way of caring relationships? Or, is power essential to such relationships? How does the acknowledgment of bias influence educators’ abilities to work for social justice? Do personal and professional identities inform educational leaders’ work in schools and universities? Or should a focus on identity be severed from educational practice in an attempt to make education “value neutral”? Clearly, many see these ideas as contradictory, rather than complementary. The authors of this special section, which will appear in the next four issues of the Journal of School Leadership, however, apply a different lens to these concepts within the context of teaching educational leadership.

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